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Lessor/Lessee vs Landlord/Tenant

English translation: lessor/lessee is more legalese

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17:43 Dec 18, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s) / Lease/Rental Agreement
English term or phrase: Lessor/Lessee vs Landlord/Tenant
In a commercial lease/rental agreement for offices...

I've seen examples for both and I can't decide which one to use in a translation. Is there a difference?

Are there other alternatives?

Also, is there a difference between a 'lease agreement' and a 'rental agreement'?

US usage preferred. Thank you!
xxxzsuzsa369
Local time: 01:21
English translation:lessor/lessee is more legalese
Explanation:
Whereas landlord/tenant is more for general usage. This is a question I myself asked of a lawyer friend of mine, when I first encountered this issue some years back, and such was his response.

With regard to agreement, here's a good article explaining the difference: http://www.allbusiness.com/legal/contracts-agreements-real-e...

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Note added at 49 mins (2007-12-18 18:33:11 GMT)
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writeaway, if, by your own admission, there are many examples of such usage, does this not contradict your argument?

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-12-18 18:43:19 GMT)
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writeaway, certainly, but in this case their existence and abundance of use does contradict your argument. Please show me any actual evidence of the contrary, and I will gladly admit that I am wrong.
Selected response from:

Mark Berelekhis
United States
Local time: 20:21
Grading comment
Thank you, Mark, I've found this link very helpful. My document appears to be a lease as it specifies a time-frame, so it would make perfect sense to use Lessor/Lessee (though the latter rather reminds me of 'Lassie' the dog!) Thanks to everyone for your input as well. This seems to be one of those questions with no definitive answer.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7Essentially the sameWill Matter
4 +3UK - the same, but at the same time not
Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
4 -2lessor/lessee is more legalese
Mark Berelekhis
2lessor / lessee insists on the fact that they are party to a lease contractBusterK


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
lessor/lessee vs landlord/tenant
Essentially the same


Explanation:
I would say that all of your terms are essentially equal but they differ (slightly) in terms of usage, nuance and perceived level of formality. In the US I would say that the use of 'lessor/lessee' is perceived to be more formal (legalistic) than 'landlord/tenant' and that, quite often, the use of 'landlord/tenant' is used more frequently when referring to actual dwelling places (as opposed to business or commercial property) but this is not a hard and fast "rule". For 'lease agreement' versus 'rental agreement' I would say that most people in the US would generally use the term 'lease' when referring to actually leasing some type of physical object, (like a car or truck or moving van) and would tend to use 'rent' or 'rental' to refer to property where they dwell (house, apartment, condo) but, here again, this is not a hard and fast "rule" it simply depends which terms you care to use. Essentially both sets of terms are, IMHO, relatively interchangeable; both are used and would be understood. If you're looking for a higher level of formality that sounds more "businesslike" or "legal" I suggest using 'lessor/lessee' and, if not, use 'landlord/tenant'. HTH.

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Note added at 25 mins (2007-12-18 18:08:15 GMT)
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BTW, I'm a native English speaker and English teacher who was born and raised in the US. Well aware of the nuances and usage of this particular variety of English in this particular area of the world.

Will Matter
United States
Local time: 17:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: all 4 terms are legalese so to speak, but as you point out, they aren't used for the same things.
12 mins
  -> Thank you for the 'agree'.

agree  Robert Kleemaier
14 mins
  -> Thank you, also.

agree  MikeGarcia
25 mins
  -> Gracias, amigo.

agree  Mónica Sauza
2 hrs
  -> Gracias, colega.

agree  orientalhorizon
6 hrs
  -> Xie xie.

agree  Rusinterp
1 day5 hrs
  -> Balshoye spasiba.

agree  Peter Skipp
1 day22 hrs
  -> Blagodarya. ;0)
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
lessor/lessee vs landlord/tenant
lessor/lessee is more legalese


Explanation:
Whereas landlord/tenant is more for general usage. This is a question I myself asked of a lawyer friend of mine, when I first encountered this issue some years back, and such was his response.

With regard to agreement, here's a good article explaining the difference: http://www.allbusiness.com/legal/contracts-agreements-real-e...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 49 mins (2007-12-18 18:33:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

writeaway, if, by your own admission, there are many examples of such usage, does this not contradict your argument?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-12-18 18:43:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

writeaway, certainly, but in this case their existence and abundance of use does contradict your argument. Please show me any actual evidence of the contrary, and I will gladly admit that I am wrong.

Mark Berelekhis
United States
Local time: 20:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you, Mark, I've found this link very helpful. My document appears to be a lease as it specifies a time-frame, so it would make perfect sense to use Lessor/Lessee (though the latter rather reminds me of 'Lassie' the dog!) Thanks to everyone for your input as well. This seems to be one of those questions with no definitive answer.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Steffen Walter: Not sure re. the degree of legalese. I suspect that this is rather an AmE vs. BrE issue (lessor/lessee being predominantly used in US English, landlord/tenant in BrE).
15 mins
  -> I reckon that our experiences differ. In the States, while real estate, for instance, uses almost exclusively landlord/tenant in their documents, the majority of legal agreements that I've seen use lessor/lessee.

disagree  writeaway: they are both 'legalese'. but landlord tenant would be more for a private (apt/house) rental agreement and lessor/lessee would be more for a commericial lease/sure-you can find incorrect example of everything. their mere existence doesn't make them right.
24 mins
  -> I could show you countless examples where this is not the case, i.e., where landlord/tenant is used for commercial lease.

disagree  Refugio: As your reference explains, a lease agreement (lessor/lessee) sets a fixed term and a rental agreement doesn't. Most commercial agreements are leases, since month-to-month would be too unstable for a business. A tenant can be either a lessee or a renter.
17 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
lessor/lessee vs landlord/tenant
lessor / lessee insists on the fact that they are party to a lease contract


Explanation:
although it may refer to the same person, you insist with lessee / lessor on the lease relationship.

If a contractor is working for one of them, I think he would call them landlord / tenant because he just doesn't care about the lease contract.

On the other hand, they are the terms used from an accounting standpoint when you are interested in the way the lease contract should be accounted for and what matters is that one is the lessee and the other the lessor.

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Note added at 1 heure (2007-12-18 19:06:35 GMT)
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To clarify:
"The tenant (or landlord) is very nice": you really don't care about the contract.
"The lessee shall pay the lessor every month": you are specifically addressing their contractual relationship.

However, I am not a native speaker.

BusterK
Local time: 02:21
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: I don't understand what you are basing this on. What does a contractor have to do with anything?
7 mins
  -> he only may work for one of them but doesn't care about the lease agreement, so that he will not use lessor / lessee.
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
lessor/lessee vs landlord/tenant
UK - the same, but at the same time not


Explanation:
As your based in the UK, I assume you refer to British usage.

Officially the terms are equivalents, in reality they relate to whether or not you are buying the flat

In England (rest of UK have different legal requirements), when you buy a flat, you don't actually 'buy' the flat. What you actually do is purchase a lease/contract. In this transaction, you (the buyer) becomes the lessee and the seller is the lessor of the lease/contract. These leases/contracts are usually valid for 99 to 999 years.

Because of the length of contract, you feel like you "own" the flat. However, all you actually own is the lease/contract.

If you instead rent the flat (on a much shorter term), you are generally referred to as a "tenant" and the person who owns the flat (or more correctly, is probably a "lessee" - see above) lets you the flat on a "shorthold assured tenancy".

Apart from the variation in terminology, your legal position in the two cases above is very different.

Regardless of this, whether you "buy" your flat or just rent it, you never actually own it (although it might be possible to buy the freehold (ownership) together with your neighbours - if you're a lessee).


Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SwedishSwedish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Will Matter: Asker specifically inquired about US usage but I agree with what you have written, per se.
5 hrs

agree  Rusinterp
23 hrs

agree  Peter Skipp
1 day17 hrs

agree  chaisaeng nagler
1862 days
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