KudoZ home » English » Law (general)

coroner's office vs. Institute of forensic medicine

English translation: Judicial vs. medical

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
13:47 Jan 16, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
English term or phrase: coroner's office vs. Institute of forensic medicine
Dear All,

What is the difference between coroner's office and Institute (department) of forensic medicine?

Many Thanks
Mehmet Hascan
Ireland
Local time: 03:53
English translation:Judicial vs. medical
Explanation:
In the UK, the Coroner's Office is the judicial office which investigates the circumstances of a death, while the institute or department of forensic medicine would normally be a hospital department - but is in any event medical, and NOT judicial - where the actual cause of death would be established.

That's the difference in a nutshell; if you do need more, then maybe Wikipedia can help, but as you will see, it tends to have a rather transatlantic slant.
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 04:53
Grading comment
thank you all very much indeed.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1Judicial vs. medicalDavid Moore
4expl.xxxmistahara


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
coroner's office vs. institute of forensic medicine
Judicial vs. medical


Explanation:
In the UK, the Coroner's Office is the judicial office which investigates the circumstances of a death, while the institute or department of forensic medicine would normally be a hospital department - but is in any event medical, and NOT judicial - where the actual cause of death would be established.

That's the difference in a nutshell; if you do need more, then maybe Wikipedia can help, but as you will see, it tends to have a rather transatlantic slant.

David Moore
Local time: 04:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 35
Grading comment
thank you all very much indeed.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks a mil. David. That's exactly what I thought.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxmistahara: "The Coroner will seek to establish the medical cause of death."
39 mins
  -> ---by engaging someone from the Forensic Department at the local hospital...

agree  Ken Cox: I would imagine that an institute or department of forensic medicine would also teach forensic medicine (in a teaching hospital) or conduct research in the field, while a coroner's office is only interested in determining the cause of death.
47 mins
  -> Thanks, Ken
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
coroner's office vs. institute of forensic medicine
expl.


Explanation:
I think you can find a detailed explanation in the Wiki article here:

"In some jurisdictions, the title of "Medical Examiner" is used by a non-physician, elected official involved in medicolegal death investigation. In others, the law requires the medical examiner to be a physician, pathologist, or forensic pathologist.

Similarly, the title "Coroner" is applied to both physicians and non-physicians. Historically, coroners were not all physicians (most often serving primarily as the town mortician). However, in some jurisdictions the title of "Coroner" is exclusively used by physicians."

"The Forensic pathologist:

Is a medical doctor who has completed training in anatomical pathology and who has subsequently sub-specialized in forensic pathology. 'Fully qualified' forensic pathologists are individuals who have completed their pathology residency and forensic pathology fellowship and have passed the "board" examination administered by The American Board of Pathology ("board-certified") (United States) or who are eligible for inclusion on the specialist register of the General Medical Council (GMC) having obtained Membership of the Royal College of Pathologists (United Kingdom). "

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forensic_pathology

see also "Coroner"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coroner



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-01-16 15:40:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"The following is a brief synopsis of the work of the Coroner
Who are Coroners?

The office of Coroner is very ancient and dates back to William the Conqueror.

Coroners are independent judicial officers in England and Wales who must follow laws that apply to Coroners and Inquests. They must be a qualified and experienced doctor, solicitor or barrister. Her Majesty’s Coroner for the Eastern District of London is Dr Elizabeth Stearns, who is a Doctor and a Barrister at Law. The Deputy Coroner is Dr William Dolman. The Assistant Deputy Coroner is Dr Fiona Wilcox.

The Coroner’s Service is funded jointly by the local authorities within the Eastern District of London Coroners Jurisdiction.

What do Coroners do?

Coroners inquire into deaths reported to them that appear to be of a violent, unnatural, sudden or unknown cause. The Coroner will seek to establish the medical cause of death.

What is the role of the Coroners Officer?

Coroners Officers work under the direction of the Coroner and liaise with bereaved families, the emergency services, government agencies, doctors, hospitals and funeral directors.

Natural deaths

If a person dies of an expected illness and a Registered Medical Practitioner has seen them during their last illness and within fourteen days of the death, that doctor can issue a Medical Cause of Death certificate. Under these circumstances there is no involvement of the Coroners Service.

Are all deaths reported to the Coroner?

No, in most cases, a GP or hospital doctor can certify the medical cause of death and issue the Medical Cause of Death Certificate. The death can then be registered with the Registrar of Births and Deaths. The Registrar may refer deaths to the Coroner if the cause shown is unacceptable or requires further inquiries.

Which deaths need to be referred to the Coroner?

When the cause of death is unknown or cannot be ascertained. All deaths of an unnatural or violent nature, or where there are suspicious circumstances, are also referred. The Coroner will seek to establish the medical cause of death by post-mortem examination.

What is a Post-mortem examination?

A post-mortem examination is a medical examination of a body carried out by a pathologist appointed by the Coroner. The Coroner will give notice of the need for an examination unless this is not practicable or would unduly delay the examination.

The consent of the next-of-kin is not required for a Coroner’s post-mortem, however the next-of-kin are entitled to be represented at the examination by a doctor of their choice.


Post-mortem report

This report gives details of the examination of the body. It may also give details of any laboratory tests carried out. Copies of the report will normally be available to the next-of-kin and to certain other parties. A Local Authority administration fee is payable.

If the cause of death remains unknown or it is determined to be as the result of a violent or unnatural cause, then a formal Inquest will be opened.

The Coroner will thoroughly investigate the death, obtaining statements from all parties with any useful information. Frequently the police will also assist in the investigation, particularly if there are suspicions surrounding the death.

Medical Records

Medical records remain confidential after death. Coroners are entitled to request medical information that is relevant and necessary to their inquiries."

www.lbwf.gov.uk/index/environment/env-funerals/coroners.htm

A Coroner establishes if a post-mortem examination is needed. If so, the post-mortem (autopsy, forensic scientific examination) shall be conducted by a forensic pathologist.
A Coroner is not necessarily a MD (see Wiki article)
http://www.forensicmed.co.uk/

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-01-16 15:43:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

They are two different institutions
http://www.coronersociety.org.uk/

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-01-16 16:54:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This is not the distinction between judicial and medical. They both have judicial AND medical roles.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-01-16 17:01:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For instance: the Coroner is the one who investigates the crime scene: he establishes if a violent death is involved; if the death is of a violent nature, the body is then handed over to the forensic pathologists ( Institute of forensic medicine) for further investigations.

xxxmistahara
Local time: 05:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, mistahara. But I am still not sure if coroner's office and Institute of forensic medicine are the same thing.

Asker: Thank you very much for your time and help. http://www.coronerdublincity.ie/about.htm


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Moore: This is in general US usage; I'm not sure (yet) whether that is what IRLANDALI is needing.
32 mins
  -> The article explains in detail all possible usages (UK, US, Australia etc.). That's why I recommended it...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search