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hiring vs. renting

English translation: the difference between hire and rent

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10:06 Mar 7, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
English term or phrase: hiring vs. renting
In a splash screen for a CR-ROM there is copyright information.
In the sentence "Unauthorised... hiring, renting, broadcasting of this product prohibited" I'm not sure of the difference between Hire and Rent. Is it pleonastic? I don't think so...

Thanks in advance
Massimo Lencioni
Local time: 19:58
English translation:the difference between hire and rent
Explanation:
According to Longman's Dictionary of English Language and Culture the difference between "hire" and "rent" (in BrE) is as follows: You hire things for just a short time (car, suit, etc.) and you rent things for a longer period (television, house, flat, etc.). In AmE you rent all of these things.

Good luck!
Selected response from:

Barbara Østergaard
Denmark
Local time: 19:58
Grading comment
Thank you all very much!
I decided not to make the nuance explicit in the splash screen. But I appreciate the additional insight.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3the difference between hire and rent
Barbara Østergaard
4 +2pleonasticChris Rowson
4Another nuance
Alaa Zeineldine
4hire/rent
VERTERE
4Hiring/rentingKenji Otomo
4 -2hire / hiring = BrE vs. rent / renting AmE
Steven Geller


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
pleonastic


Explanation:
I think it is.

Chris Rowson
Local time: 19:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 243

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christina Clark: As it very often is in legal texts. Wanting to cover every possible aspect, I suppose. ;-)
7 mins
  -> :-)

agree  Barbara Østergaard: I agree :-)
22 mins
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
hire / hiring = BrE vs. rent / renting AmE


Explanation:
In very broad terms, one tends to say hire in British English, but rent in American English.

For example, in the UK car hire, but in the U.S. car rental.

It is not a rule, but rather a matter of useage.

And, of course there are exceptions, one does not "rent" a person, or if someone does, they would not generally "write" about it.

Steven Geller
Local time: 19:58
PRO pts in pair: 2

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Chris Rowson: We Brits often say "rent". But I really can´t figure out when we say rent and when hire ...
7 mins

disagree  Sven Petersson: See below!
30 mins
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
the difference between hire and rent


Explanation:
According to Longman's Dictionary of English Language and Culture the difference between "hire" and "rent" (in BrE) is as follows: You hire things for just a short time (car, suit, etc.) and you rent things for a longer period (television, house, flat, etc.). In AmE you rent all of these things.

Good luck!

Barbara Østergaard
Denmark
Local time: 19:58
Native speaker of: Native in DanishDanish
PRO pts in pair: 12
Grading comment
Thank you all very much!
I decided not to make the nuance explicit in the splash screen. But I appreciate the additional insight.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Rowson: I´m still thinking about it, but I suspect this is correct
6 mins

agree  Alison Schwitzgebel: yes, that's it
11 mins

agree  Sven Petersson
25 mins

agree  Mary Worby: Although this is probably true, the distinction is not understood by most people and they would use them interchangeable ... I'd be happy renting cars and hiring televisions!
1 hr

neutral  Yuri Geifman: sounds like rent vs. lease... hire and rent are synomyms, not necessarily making one of them redundant... aren't lawyers notoriously fond of using every synonym in the book wherever they can? :-)
5 hrs

disagree  John Kinory: In the UK, you always rent cars, never hire them.
9 hrs
  -> You're absolutely right John. Nevertheless, this is what Longman writes.
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Hiring/renting


Explanation:
I think "hiring" is "to hire", for example to hire a car. But "renting" in another thing. Yes, other person said "rent" is in american english. But "renting" is a bank product too. In bank terminology, renting is a kind of loan. Some companies have a lot of salesman. Each one has a car. If the company had to buy all cars, the expenses woulb be higher and higher. In this cases, renting is very useful. The company is not the owner but the Bank or Financial Society.

Kenji Otomo
Spain
Local time: 19:58
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
hire/rent


Explanation:
Hire= to purchase the temporary use of a thing.
Rent= it is the compensation or fee paid, usually periodically for the use of any property, land, building ecc.
This is the difference.
Ref. West's law & commercial dictionary

VERTERE
Italy
Local time: 19:58
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Another nuance


Explanation:
You hire a consultant, a contractor, a secretary, etc. They might get offended if you rent them.

Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 19:58
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 198
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