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detained vs. incarcerated

English translation: detained vs. incarcerated

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:detained vs. incarcerated
English translation:detained vs. incarcerated
Entered by: Ildiko Santana
Options:
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02:42 Aug 15, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
English term or phrase: detained vs. incarcerated
l
lukeg_1
Canada
Local time: 03:19
detained vs. incarcerated
Explanation:
*detained*
A person kept from goods or land/property to which s/he has a legal right; a person in a missing (detained) status if prevented from proceeding or restrained in custody for alleged violation of international law or other reason claimed by an organization or group under which the person is being held.

*detention*
Restraining a person for some official purpose, by establishing control over the person.

*investigative detention*
The holding of a suspect without formal arrest during the investigation of her/his possible participation in a crime.

*incarcerated*
A person confined in prison, jail or penitentiary; synonymous with *imprisoned*.
(carcer = prison cell, prison)

I hope this answers your (not too clearly worded) question.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-15 03:56:34 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In addition, please see below the entries from Merriam-Webster and The American Heritage Dictionary:

*de·tain*
Pronunciation: di-\'tAn, dE-
Function: transitive verb
Etymology: Middle English deteynen, from Middle French detenir, modification of Latin detinEre, from de- + tenEre to hold -- more at THIN
Date: 15th century
1 : to hold or keep in or as if in custody
2 : to restrain especially from proceeding

*de·tain*
1: To keep from proceeding; delay or retard.
2: To keep in custody or temporary confinement: The police detained several suspects for questioning. The disruptive students were detained after school until their parents had been notified.

*in·car·cer·ate*
Pronunciation: in-\'kär-s&-\"rAt
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form(s): -at·ed; -at·ing
Etymology: Latin incarceratus, past participle of incarcerare, from in- + carcer prison
Date: 1560
1 : to put in prison
2 : to subject to confinement

*in·car·cer·ate*
1: To put into jail.
2: To shut in; confine.
[Medieval Latin incarcerre, incarcert- : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin carcer, prison.]
Selected response from:

Ildiko Santana
United States
Local time: 00:19
Grading comment
I agree 100% with both of you. Just needed a confirmation from you monolinguals...there was a difference in opinion in a Polish>English pair. I feel bad I can award points to just one answerer...so I go for ildiko. Hugo, I hope you forgive me; ildiko put so much effort into it...good sense of humor...not to mention a picture.:)
Thank you both!
Luke
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2detained= the person is in custody, surrounded by police officersJH Trads
5detained vs. incarcerated
Ildiko Santana


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
detained= the person is in custody, surrounded by police officers


Explanation:
most of the times, awaiting a decision regarding its incarceration or not


incarcerated= the person is in jail

JH Trads
United States
Local time: 02:19
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rafa Lombardino
18 mins

neutral  Ildiko Santana: No nation can afford the luxury to have enough officers that surround each detainee... :)
59 mins

agree  Herman Vilella: laying of hand by one (1) officer is detained
2 days5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
detained vs. incarcerated


Explanation:
*detained*
A person kept from goods or land/property to which s/he has a legal right; a person in a missing (detained) status if prevented from proceeding or restrained in custody for alleged violation of international law or other reason claimed by an organization or group under which the person is being held.

*detention*
Restraining a person for some official purpose, by establishing control over the person.

*investigative detention*
The holding of a suspect without formal arrest during the investigation of her/his possible participation in a crime.

*incarcerated*
A person confined in prison, jail or penitentiary; synonymous with *imprisoned*.
(carcer = prison cell, prison)

I hope this answers your (not too clearly worded) question.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-15 03:56:34 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In addition, please see below the entries from Merriam-Webster and The American Heritage Dictionary:

*de·tain*
Pronunciation: di-\'tAn, dE-
Function: transitive verb
Etymology: Middle English deteynen, from Middle French detenir, modification of Latin detinEre, from de- + tenEre to hold -- more at THIN
Date: 15th century
1 : to hold or keep in or as if in custody
2 : to restrain especially from proceeding

*de·tain*
1: To keep from proceeding; delay or retard.
2: To keep in custody or temporary confinement: The police detained several suspects for questioning. The disruptive students were detained after school until their parents had been notified.

*in·car·cer·ate*
Pronunciation: in-\'kär-s&-\"rAt
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form(s): -at·ed; -at·ing
Etymology: Latin incarceratus, past participle of incarcerare, from in- + carcer prison
Date: 1560
1 : to put in prison
2 : to subject to confinement

*in·car·cer·ate*
1: To put into jail.
2: To shut in; confine.
[Medieval Latin incarcerre, incarcert- : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin carcer, prison.]

Ildiko Santana
United States
Local time: 00:19
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 162
Grading comment
I agree 100% with both of you. Just needed a confirmation from you monolinguals...there was a difference in opinion in a Polish>English pair. I feel bad I can award points to just one answerer...so I go for ildiko. Hugo, I hope you forgive me; ildiko put so much effort into it...good sense of humor...not to mention a picture.:)
Thank you both!
Luke
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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