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guarantee and warranty

English translation: The above definitions are well and good; however, in practice, ...

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15:31 Dec 29, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
English term or phrase: guarantee and warranty
What are the main difference between guarantee and warranty?
R. Chopra
English translation:The above definitions are well and good; however, in practice, ...
Explanation:
there are differences in expectations between a product guarantee and a product warranty. Frequently a guarantee implies that you get your money back if a product is defective, whereas a warranty may just agree to repair the defect.

A Limited Warranty (more and more common nowadays) puts certain conditions and limitations on the parts covered, type of damage covered, and/or time period for which the agreement is good. I don't think I have ever heard of a limitied guarantee.

In some sense I think warranty has become a weasel word for guarantee. You expect less, and you get less.
Selected response from:

Refugio
Local time: 22:24
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4The above definitions are well and good; however, in practice, ...Refugio
4 +3Warranty more US EN usage, Guarantee more UK EN plus
Hermeneutica
5 +2By way of additional information to JCEC's answerPaul Stevens
4 +3Definitions
JCEC
5There isn't one ...
David Knowles
3 +1You can't use warranty as a verb.
Alaa Zeineldine


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Definitions


Explanation:
guarantee

1. Something that assures a particular outcome or condition: Lack of interest is a guarantee of failure.

2.

- A promise or an assurance, especially one given in writing, that attests to the quality or durability of a product or service.

- A pledge that something will be performed in a specified manner.

3.

- A guaranty by which one person assumes responsibility for paying another's debts or fulfilling another's responsibilities.

- A guaranty for the execution, completion, or existence of something.

4. A guarantor.

warranty

1. Official authorization, sanction, or warrant.

2. Justification or valid grounds for an act or a course of action.

3. Law

- An assurance by the seller of property that the goods or property are as represented or will be as promised.

- The insured's guarantee that the facts are as stated in reference to an insurance risk or that specified conditions will be fulfilled to keep the contract effective.

- A covenant by which the seller of land binds himself or herself and his or her heirs to defend the security of the estate conveyed.

- A judicial writ; a warrant.

4. A guarantee given to the purchaser by a company stating that a product is reliable and free from known defects and that the seller will, without charge, repair or replace defective parts within a given time limit and under certain conditions.

www.yourdictionary.com

JCEC
Canada
Local time: 01:24
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 59

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Montefiore: except that in the US the purchaser gets a warranty (in writing) and a guarantee (a generic promise)
1 hr
  -> Thank you

agree  Rusinterp
6 hrs

agree  Dolly Xu
22 hrs
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
There isn't one ...


Explanation:
... at least as far as consumer goods and products are concerned.

Both set out what the seller or manufacturer promises to do if the goods are not of the required standard or fail in use.

David Knowles
Local time: 06:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 612
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
The above definitions are well and good; however, in practice, ...


Explanation:
there are differences in expectations between a product guarantee and a product warranty. Frequently a guarantee implies that you get your money back if a product is defective, whereas a warranty may just agree to repair the defect.

A Limited Warranty (more and more common nowadays) puts certain conditions and limitations on the parts covered, type of damage covered, and/or time period for which the agreement is good. I don't think I have ever heard of a limitied guarantee.

In some sense I think warranty has become a weasel word for guarantee. You expect less, and you get less.

Refugio
Local time: 22:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 485
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nancy Arrowsmith
7 mins
  -> Thanks Nancy

agree  Montefiore
59 mins
  -> Thanks Montefiore

agree  Rusinterp
6 hrs
  -> Thanks Rsntrp

agree  AhmedAMS
8 days
  -> Thanks Ahmed. It pays to prospect for gold in the back country.
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46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
By way of additional information to JCEC's answer


Explanation:
I would add that, in an insurance context, a "warranty" is a strict condition that must be complied with.

Ref: 20+ years' insurance broking experience.

Paul Stevens
Local time: 06:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JCEC
3 mins

agree  Rusinterp
5 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Warranty more US EN usage, Guarantee more UK EN plus


Explanation:
In addition to the other good pointers given in previous answers ... I remember I basically had to learn to say "warranty" instead of "guarantee" for appliances etc. when I went to live in the US.

Within the US, you give a guarantee, that is you promise for sure something will happen, and a warranty is more the scope of what is guaranteed. You could, for the purposes of this discussion, say, "we guarantee that the warranty conditions will be complied with".

Although I feel really certain of this, I am marking myself one down from "I am sure" because it is such a fine line.

HTH

Dee

Hermeneutica
Switzerland
Local time: 07:24
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Montefiore
24 mins

agree  Peter Coles
5 hrs

agree  Alaa Zeineldine
14 hrs
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
You can't use warranty as a verb.


Explanation:
Just pointing out what Dee has implied in her example combining the two words.

Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 07:24
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 198

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
7 days
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