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bibliographic abbreviation

English translation: id., idem

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:bibliographic abbreviation
English translation:id., idem
Entered by: Nick Lingris
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16:53 May 30, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: bibliographic abbreviation
Hi folks, I have a bibliographic reference in an article I'm translating from Italian to English.
The Italian uses "id." (idem) to avoid writing the name of the same author who wrote a different book.
As an example:
John D. Smith, Book A, New York 1995; idem, Book B, New York 1998.

Some style guides I've read say to avoid using idem. Others go on about ibid. and op.cit. but don't discuss idem at all.
My question is: do I use idem in this fashion, or should I put:
John D. Smith, Book A, New York 1995; John D. Smith, Book B, New York 1998.

TIA
Catherine
Catherine Bolton
Local time: 13:24
id.
Explanation:
Use the abbreviation of idem, id. (not italicized).
…It is used generally to avoid repetition of author’s name in footnotes or bibliographical matter. [Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors]
Also, according to the Style Manual of the United States Government Printing Office.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 mins (2005-05-30 17:15:51 GMT)
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Therefore, either:
John D. Smith, Book A, New York 1995; idem, Book B, New York 1998.
or:
John D. Smith, Book A, New York 1995; id., Book B, New York 1998.

idem in italics, id. not italicized

Selected response from:

Nick Lingris
Local time: 14:24
Grading comment
Thanks a lot!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +7id.
Nick Lingris
5 +1ibid
David Russi
5Exactly as you have put it because...Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
ibid


Explanation:
We headed straight to Merriam-Webster Online, a dictionary and all-purpose English language resource, where we learned that "ibid" is short for ibidem, Latin for "in the same place." It's an expression used in bibliographies when authors repeatedly cite the same source. So instead of typing out Sharks: Mighty Finned Killers of the Deep every time you refer to the book you used in your science project, you simply type "Ibid" for each reference after the first one, then cite the page number to which you're referring.


    Reference: http://ask.yahoo.com/ask/19991209.html
David Russi
United States
Local time: 05:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 21

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nico Staes
0 min

neutral  Lucie Brione: I think Catherine is referring to the same author, but a different book. Ibid. is used when referring to the same source (i.e. same book), so that would not be appropriate here.
5 mins

neutral  humbird: I agree with Lucie.
1 hr
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
id.


Explanation:
Use the abbreviation of idem, id. (not italicized).
…It is used generally to avoid repetition of author’s name in footnotes or bibliographical matter. [Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors]
Also, according to the Style Manual of the United States Government Printing Office.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 mins (2005-05-30 17:15:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Therefore, either:
John D. Smith, Book A, New York 1995; idem, Book B, New York 1998.
or:
John D. Smith, Book A, New York 1995; id., Book B, New York 1998.

idem in italics, id. not italicized



Nick Lingris
Local time: 14:24
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 52
Grading comment
Thanks a lot!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nanny Wintjens
10 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Can Altinbay: I also see the underscore __ to indicate the same.
1 hr
  -> Thanks.

agree  paolamonaco
1 hr
  -> Thanks.

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Marju.

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: nicely put
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Jonathan.

agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Margaret. Greetings from Athens.

agree  silfilla
5 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Exactly as you have put it because...


Explanation:
it is less confusing. Id is a correct abbreviation of idem but also of identity so your idea would be best, I think.

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 13:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 28
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