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bridegroom-to-be vs. would-be-bridegroom

English translation: certainty vs uncertainty

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11:15 Nov 2, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: bridegroom-to-be vs. would-be-bridegroom
is there any difference, please? if yes, what is it?
Jolanta Konowalczyk
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:11
English translation:certainty vs uncertainty
Explanation:
A bridegroom-to-be is definitely getting married in the future - he has a fiancé who has agreed to marry him.

A would-be bridegroom - there is less certainty here, and it could be one of several things - he might want to get married in some vague way, perhaps he wants to get married but his girlfriend doesn't, perhaps he can't find the right woman.

Re. Anna's question - they are both 'correct' and this is the difference in meaning.

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Note added at 38 mins (2006-11-02 11:53:47 GMT)
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yes, also as Stephen says - events might have got in the way. Mr Rochester in Jane Eyre is, in a way, a would-be bridegroom when he goes to the church to marry Jane.

And in older times (in the West at least) a failed suitor who is rebuffed by the woman or her family might be a would-be bridegroom (if his intention was marriage).
Selected response from:

Angela Dickson
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:11
Grading comment
thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +16certainty vs uncertainty
Angela Dickson
4 +10two different thingsxxxCMJ_Trans
4 -1bridegroom-to-be is the correct termAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
bridegroom-to-be is the correct term


Explanation:
But is that your question?

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Note added at 5 mins (2006-11-02 11:21:26 GMT)
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He who is going to be the bridegroom NOT he who might become the bridegroom which would be hypothetical.

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 07:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Can Altinbay: Both are correct depending on what you want to say.
9 hrs
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
two different things


Explanation:
bridegroom-to-be = future bridegroom, a man who is just about to get married

would-be bridegroom = sombody who would like to be a birdegroom, who would like to get married but clearly either hasn't found the right partner yet or hasn't convince his partner to tie the knot

would-be = putative

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 07:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mandy Williams
1 min

agree  Marie-Hélène Hayles
6 mins

agree  avsie
11 mins

agree  NancyLynn: would-be = putative: very pithy!
11 mins

agree  Stephen Reader: (see @ Angela)
11 mins

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: would-be usually implying some kind of match-making or other
15 mins

agree  Peter Shortall
39 mins

agree  William [Bill] Gray
52 mins

agree  Can Altinbay
9 hrs

agree  Sophia Finos
9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +16
certainty vs uncertainty


Explanation:
A bridegroom-to-be is definitely getting married in the future - he has a fiancé who has agreed to marry him.

A would-be bridegroom - there is less certainty here, and it could be one of several things - he might want to get married in some vague way, perhaps he wants to get married but his girlfriend doesn't, perhaps he can't find the right woman.

Re. Anna's question - they are both 'correct' and this is the difference in meaning.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2006-11-02 11:53:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

yes, also as Stephen says - events might have got in the way. Mr Rochester in Jane Eyre is, in a way, a would-be bridegroom when he goes to the church to marry Jane.

And in older times (in the West at least) a failed suitor who is rebuffed by the woman or her family might be a would-be bridegroom (if his intention was marriage).

Angela Dickson
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mandy Williams
2 mins

agree  garci
3 mins

agree  Marie-Hélène Hayles
6 mins

agree  Stephen Reader: re. scope of 'would-be': also even 'would have been, had not xyz happened'
11 mins

agree  avsie
11 mins

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: yes, there is a subtle difference that isn't always clear at first
12 mins

agree  xxxmuitoprazer
21 mins

agree  Alison Jenner
25 mins

agree  Peter Shortall
40 mins

agree  William [Bill] Gray: Some good points made here. Thank you!
55 mins

agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver: I've seen the particle "would-be" attached to nouns to express a desire (to be something, e.g., "a would-be writer") or will, or a failure to become something || As an adjective: desiring or professing to be -- often used disparagingly (Merriam-Webster)
2 hrs

agree  Tony M: Well put!
4 hrs

agree  Robert Fox
8 hrs

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
8 hrs

agree  Can Altinbay
9 hrs

agree  Sophia Finos
9 hrs
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