KudoZ home » English » Linguistics

yer=you; fer=for; er = a (article): terrin' = tearing

English translation: Scottish

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:yer / fer / er / terrin'
English translation:Scottish
Entered by: kironne
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

03:05 Apr 8, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / can it be some local, regional, other speech
English term or phrase: yer=you; fer=for; er = a (article): terrin' = tearing
Examples of his speech:

Yer gets obsolete every time yer hits port.

If yer lucky and devils ain't terrin' your country apart with er war.

I am interested to know whether it (use of those yer, er, fer) indicates some local dialect, etc.? Could it show that the speaker, say, is Scottish, Irish, Welsh?

Speaker is a male, navy mechanic, and he's chewing tobacco all the time. Probably it simply affects his speech?

What do you think?
Vladimir Dubisskiy
United States
Local time: 14:44
Scottish
Explanation:

Vladimir,

It comes from Scottish. But it has triggered all kinds of new words and slang.

And pirates, too! ; )

AAAaaaaarrr!!!

Appendix
... he responded in a good hearty Scottish accent, " ‘Yer too 'fer 'sooth! ... Sellar, W.D.H. "Family Origins In Cowal And Knapdale", SCOTTISH STUDIES, ...
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~steve/robertwg/appendix.htm

Sail Lore
According to an ancient Scottish legend, later turned into verse by Robert Burns ... 'Tain't fitten fer to lower. Go for'ard an' stan' yer watch!" ...
http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Park/8386/saillore.htm

www.myspace.com/51406568
My Scottish sept name is MacAskill of the clan McLeod/Lewis. ... stopping in tae wish ye all the best fer 2007 and tae thank ye fer yer brave, brave heart. ...
http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewpro...


I suggest you browse these websites:

Scottish - Whits fur ye'll no gin by ye
English - What's meant for you will not pass you by.
http://www.paidmyre.demon.co.uk/

http://www.firstfoot.com/php/scotsquotes/index.php?letter=s

We speak Scottish
http://fas.sfu.ca/quote/quotation.2005-06-06.2740778359

Amazon.co.uk: Awa' An' Bile Yer Heid!: Scottish Curses and Insults ...
Haud Yer Wheesht!: Your Scottish Granny's Favourite Sayings ... The Luath Scots Language Learner: How to Understand and Speak Scots ...
www.amazon.co.uk/Awa-Bile-Yer-Heid-Scottish/sim/1841582441/...

...........................................................

And just for fun...
So how does one go about speaking pirate? Here are some handy tips for beginners:

1) Double up on all your adjectives. Pirates never speak of “a big ship”, they call it a “great, grand ship!”

2) Drop all your “g’s” and “v’s” when you speak. You'll get words like “sailin’” and “fightin’”, “ne’er” and “o’er”.

3) Instead of saying “I am”, pirates say, “I be”. “You / they are” = “You / they be”.

4) Ne'er speak in anythin' but the present tense, and if it be helpin', start yer sentence wi' a "Arr, me hearty," in a deep, throaty voice — ye'll find that the rest be comin' much easier.

And now for some basic vocabulary.
Ahoy: Hello!

Aye: Why yes, I agree most heartily with everything you just said or did.

Beauty: The best possible pirate address for a woman. Always preceded by “me,” as in, “C’mere, me beauty,” or even, “me buxom beauty,” to one particularly well endowed.

Cat o' nine tails: whip for floggin' scallywags.

Grog: A pirate's favourite drink, usually rum diluted with water, but on TLAP Day you can use it to refer to any form of alcohol.

Lily-livered scurvy dog: a fierce weapon in your arsenal of piratical lingo, meaning faint o’ heart, a bit o’ a nancy.

Matey / Me Hearty: A shipmate or a friend.

Shiver me timbers: an exclamation of surprise, to be shouted most loud.

Smartly – Do something quickly. “Smartly, me lass,” you might say when sending the bar maid off for another round on TLAP day. She will be so impressed she might well spit in your beer.
Sprogs: raw, untrained recruits

Swashbucklin': fightin' and carousin' on the high seas!

Thar: The opposite of "here".

Walk the plank: this one be obvious.

Wench: a lady, although ye gents not be wantin' to use this around a lady who be stronger than ye.

Yo-ho-ho: Pirate laughter John and Mark hasten to point out, however, that pirates were bad people. Even the most casual exploration of the history of pirates leaves you hip deep in blood and barbarity, and the friendly Yanks aren't for one minute suggesting that real, honest-to-God pirates were in any way worth emulating. The point of the day is, well, pirate speak is funny. Silliness is the holiday's best selling point, so if you missed last Monday’s event, it’s only another 364 days until the next momentous TLAP Day.

I be already countin’ down.

Jemma McCann

http://www.manchesterconfidential.co.uk/index.asp?Sessionx=I...

http://www.talklikeapirate.com/howto.html

Selected response from:

kironne
Chile
Local time: 16:44
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4Scottish
kironne


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Scottish


Explanation:

Vladimir,

It comes from Scottish. But it has triggered all kinds of new words and slang.

And pirates, too! ; )

AAAaaaaarrr!!!

Appendix
... he responded in a good hearty Scottish accent, " ‘Yer too 'fer 'sooth! ... Sellar, W.D.H. "Family Origins In Cowal And Knapdale", SCOTTISH STUDIES, ...
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~steve/robertwg/appendix.htm

Sail Lore
According to an ancient Scottish legend, later turned into verse by Robert Burns ... 'Tain't fitten fer to lower. Go for'ard an' stan' yer watch!" ...
http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Park/8386/saillore.htm

www.myspace.com/51406568
My Scottish sept name is MacAskill of the clan McLeod/Lewis. ... stopping in tae wish ye all the best fer 2007 and tae thank ye fer yer brave, brave heart. ...
http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewpro...


I suggest you browse these websites:

Scottish - Whits fur ye'll no gin by ye
English - What's meant for you will not pass you by.
http://www.paidmyre.demon.co.uk/

http://www.firstfoot.com/php/scotsquotes/index.php?letter=s

We speak Scottish
http://fas.sfu.ca/quote/quotation.2005-06-06.2740778359

Amazon.co.uk: Awa' An' Bile Yer Heid!: Scottish Curses and Insults ...
Haud Yer Wheesht!: Your Scottish Granny's Favourite Sayings ... The Luath Scots Language Learner: How to Understand and Speak Scots ...
www.amazon.co.uk/Awa-Bile-Yer-Heid-Scottish/sim/1841582441/...

...........................................................

And just for fun...
So how does one go about speaking pirate? Here are some handy tips for beginners:

1) Double up on all your adjectives. Pirates never speak of “a big ship”, they call it a “great, grand ship!”

2) Drop all your “g’s” and “v’s” when you speak. You'll get words like “sailin’” and “fightin’”, “ne’er” and “o’er”.

3) Instead of saying “I am”, pirates say, “I be”. “You / they are” = “You / they be”.

4) Ne'er speak in anythin' but the present tense, and if it be helpin', start yer sentence wi' a "Arr, me hearty," in a deep, throaty voice — ye'll find that the rest be comin' much easier.

And now for some basic vocabulary.
Ahoy: Hello!

Aye: Why yes, I agree most heartily with everything you just said or did.

Beauty: The best possible pirate address for a woman. Always preceded by “me,” as in, “C’mere, me beauty,” or even, “me buxom beauty,” to one particularly well endowed.

Cat o' nine tails: whip for floggin' scallywags.

Grog: A pirate's favourite drink, usually rum diluted with water, but on TLAP Day you can use it to refer to any form of alcohol.

Lily-livered scurvy dog: a fierce weapon in your arsenal of piratical lingo, meaning faint o’ heart, a bit o’ a nancy.

Matey / Me Hearty: A shipmate or a friend.

Shiver me timbers: an exclamation of surprise, to be shouted most loud.

Smartly – Do something quickly. “Smartly, me lass,” you might say when sending the bar maid off for another round on TLAP day. She will be so impressed she might well spit in your beer.
Sprogs: raw, untrained recruits

Swashbucklin': fightin' and carousin' on the high seas!

Thar: The opposite of "here".

Walk the plank: this one be obvious.

Wench: a lady, although ye gents not be wantin' to use this around a lady who be stronger than ye.

Yo-ho-ho: Pirate laughter John and Mark hasten to point out, however, that pirates were bad people. Even the most casual exploration of the history of pirates leaves you hip deep in blood and barbarity, and the friendly Yanks aren't for one minute suggesting that real, honest-to-God pirates were in any way worth emulating. The point of the day is, well, pirate speak is funny. Silliness is the holiday's best selling point, so if you missed last Monday’s event, it’s only another 364 days until the next momentous TLAP Day.

I be already countin’ down.

Jemma McCann

http://www.manchesterconfidential.co.uk/index.asp?Sessionx=I...

http://www.talklikeapirate.com/howto.html



kironne
Chile
Local time: 16:44
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Awesome. Very interesting. Thank you!

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search