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Kyrgyz

English translation: please, see below

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00:27 Sep 19, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Linguistics
English term or phrase: Kyrgyz
I need to understand this name. I searched the Internet and found the Kyrgyz Republic. But since I am not familiar with this name, I need to double-check if "Kyrgyz" is a complete noun, not a possessive form like "Korean." "Korea" is the complete noun form of this country name and "Korean", as its possesive form, means its language or people when used as noun.

So my question is:
Is "Kyrgyz" equivalent to "Korea", not to "Korean"?
skyblue
United States
Local time: 03:24
English translation:please, see below
Explanation:
I guess, Kyrgyz is a language spoken in Kyrgyzstan.
So, it's an adjective that according to your analogy would be like "Korean."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2007-09-19 00:38:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyrgyzstan

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-09-19 02:33:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

the Kyrgyz Republic = adjective
the Kyrgyz language = adjective
Kyrgyz history = adjective

"The Kyrgyz state reached its greatest expansion after defeating the Uyghur Khanate in 840 A.D. Then Kyrgyz quickly moved as far as the Tian Shan range" ---
the Kyrgyz state - adjective
Krygyz quickly moved - of course, it's a noun in this sentence, which means THE KYRGYZ PEOPLE, but it's still adjectival by nature.

By analogy: (the) Russians quickly moved...
(the) Koreans quickly moved...

THE QUESTION WAS WHETHER KYRGYZ IS LIKE KOREA OR KOREAN.
It might be a lame analogy, I agree.
But KYRGYZ cannot by itself mean a state. It can only be the KYRGYZ REPUBLIC or KYRGYZSTAN (and in the former, it is clearly an adjective).
Selected response from:

Roman Ivashkiv
Local time: 01:24
Grading comment
Thank you for your time!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1a noun (language and nation; also a Kyrgyz ntional); adjectiveRita Marshall
4please, see below
Roman Ivashkiv
4Kyrgyz - noun (meaning a language), adjective (meaning people)
Victoria Novak


Discussion entries: 11





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
kyrgyz
Kyrgyz - noun (meaning a language), adjective (meaning people)


Explanation:
Kyrgyz (also spelled Kirghiz) are a Turkic ethnic group found primarily in Kyrgyzstan.
Kyrgyz or Kirghiz (Kyrgyz tili, Кыргыз тили, قىرعىز ٴتىلى) is a Turkic language, and, together with Russian, an official language of Kyrgyzstan. It is most closely related to Altay, and more distantly so to Kazakh.
Kyrgyzstan - officially the Kyrgyz Republic




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Note added at 1 hr (2007-09-19 01:38:12 GMT)
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It's vice versa!!!
Noun for a language
Adj. for people


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyrgyz
    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyrgyz_language
Victoria Novak
Local time: 03:24
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ann Nosova: adjective (language) and noun (people)
4 mins
  -> Thanks, you are right, it's just vice versa!
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
kyrgyz
please, see below


Explanation:
I guess, Kyrgyz is a language spoken in Kyrgyzstan.
So, it's an adjective that according to your analogy would be like "Korean."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2007-09-19 00:38:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyrgyzstan

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-09-19 02:33:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

the Kyrgyz Republic = adjective
the Kyrgyz language = adjective
Kyrgyz history = adjective

"The Kyrgyz state reached its greatest expansion after defeating the Uyghur Khanate in 840 A.D. Then Kyrgyz quickly moved as far as the Tian Shan range" ---
the Kyrgyz state - adjective
Krygyz quickly moved - of course, it's a noun in this sentence, which means THE KYRGYZ PEOPLE, but it's still adjectival by nature.

By analogy: (the) Russians quickly moved...
(the) Koreans quickly moved...

THE QUESTION WAS WHETHER KYRGYZ IS LIKE KOREA OR KOREAN.
It might be a lame analogy, I agree.
But KYRGYZ cannot by itself mean a state. It can only be the KYRGYZ REPUBLIC or KYRGYZSTAN (and in the former, it is clearly an adjective).

Roman Ivashkiv
Local time: 01:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you for your time!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Vadim Khazin: It is both an adjective AND a noun (not like Korea but like Dane or Pole)
17 mins
  -> No comment, please, read the question and the wikipedia entry I cited. DANE and POLE are not adjectives. THEIR adjectival forms are DANISH and POLISH.

neutral  Ann Nosova: however kyrgyz is both adjective (language) and noun (nationality) - like Russian or Ukrainian
52 mins
  -> They are still substantivized adjectives, aren't they? Ukrainian is not a valid example at all (українець - український). Русский can be both a language and a nationality, but by default it's still an adjective.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
kyrgyz
a noun (language and nation; also a Kyrgyz ntional); adjective


Explanation:
It can be a noun (the language and the naion) – also a Kyrgyz national – and an adjective, just like 'Korean'. Here is an example from Wikipedia:
According to recent historical findings, Kyrgyz history dates back to 201 BC. The early Yenisei Kirghiz lived in the upper Yenisey River valley, central Siberia. Chinese and Muslim sources of the 7th–12th centuries AD describe the Kyrgyz as red-haired with fair complexion and green (blue) eyes.

Rita Marshall
Local time: 19:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrew Vdovin
6 hrs
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Voters for reclassification
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Non-PRO (1): Roman Ivashkiv


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Changes made by editors
Sep 19, 2007 - Changes made by Сергей Лузан:
Language pairEnglish to Russian » English
FieldOther » Social Sciences


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