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teeny tiny

English translation: petite

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:teeny tiny
English translation:petite
Entered by: Will Matter
Options:
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14:52 Oct 30, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: teeny tiny
I need to describe the physical appearance (height) of a Turkish novelist in English.

According to the original text, she was a large-eyed young woman and was a diminutive figure, less than five feet tall.

Would you use the word "teeny weeny / teeny tiny" to describe her height?

OR

What would be your personal preference? petite? small-boned?

Many thanks in advance.
Mehmet Hascan
Ireland
Local time: 16:55
petite
Explanation:
Self-explanatory. HTH.

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Note added at 9 mins (2007-10-30 15:02:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is a searchable resource that might be useful for you http://www.synonym.com/synonyms// and here is yet another http://www.wordwebonline.com/search.pl?w=petite For the second reference look at the bottom of the page and you will see a list of synonyms already there, with additional info and links provided. HTH.
Selected response from:

Will Matter
United States
Local time: 08:55
Grading comment
Thank you all very much for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +7petiteWill Matter
3 +6shortKen Cox
3 +3small/tinyxxxVIV FATHIMAN
4petite, small in stature, of diminutive size
Lorraine Lamont


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
short


Explanation:
... is the most neutral term. 'Dimuntive stature' is a also a good choice in a relatively formal register. 'Tiny' is also possible, but it should be used with caution.

'Petite' sugests (at least to me) both short and slender, which is fine it the person fits this description.

Whatever you do, *don't* use teeny-weeney, itsy-bitsy, or the like (too childish and potentially derogatory).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2007-10-30 15:01:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry, 'dimunitive'

Ken Cox
Local time: 17:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 47
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks a million, Ken


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn: now I've got the "itsy-bitsy, teeny-weeny, yellow polka-dot bikini" tune in my head :-) agree with all points above
3 mins

agree  Can Altinbay: Use teeny-tiny, etc. at your own risk.
8 mins

agree  Sheila Wilson: petite or slight are possibles if slim, but this works for slim or fat
39 mins

agree  Jack Doughty: with diminutive.
1 hr
  -> if I could type I'd be dangerous...

agree  Claire Chapman: Hi Ken. Missed your comment about diminutive. Sorry about that :-)
5 hrs

agree  Will Matter: This would have been my second choice, should have included it as an addendum to my answer.
6 hrs
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
petite


Explanation:
Self-explanatory. HTH.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2007-10-30 15:02:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is a searchable resource that might be useful for you http://www.synonym.com/synonyms// and here is yet another http://www.wordwebonline.com/search.pl?w=petite For the second reference look at the bottom of the page and you will see a list of synonyms already there, with additional info and links provided. HTH.

Will Matter
United States
Local time: 08:55
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Thank you all very much for your help.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks a million, William. As far as I know, the phrase "teeny weeny / teeny tiny" is only used to describe small objects / insects etc. Can we also use it to describe a woman?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  juvera
1 min
  -> Thank you.

agree  Alexander Demyanov
8 mins
  -> Spasiba. Skolka lyet, skolka zhim, my friend.

agree  Can Altinbay: This is good, too. Again, Mehmet bey, if you use teeny, etc. to describe a person, you might get clobbered.
15 mins
  -> O-hisashiburi desu ne. Doomo for the agree.

agree  Sabine Akabayov, PhD
38 mins
  -> Danke. Toda raba. Nice CV. Welcome to ProZ.

neutral  Sheila Wilson: Fine is she's slim, but the context given doesn't exclude a short, obese woman//Please, don't interpret my comment as a disagree - just "with reservations"
43 mins
  -> I simply agreed with one of the choices the asker already offered and provided some other helpful info. Given the context I doubt that anyone would infer that the woman in question (teeny tiny) is obese, those two words don't usually 'mix'.

agree  Claire Chapman: Thank you, willmatter :-)
5 hrs
  -> Nice CV. If any textile-related stuff comes my way I'll try to remember you. Thanks for the agree.

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo: Yes. And to the asker: how come you think a term which is "used to describe small objects / insects etc." can also describe a woman. Do you consider women to be in the same category as insects???
6 hrs
  -> Thank you for the agree.

agree  Patricia Townshend
1 day5 hrs
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
small/tiny


Explanation:
If you want to emphasise her height (or rather lack of)

xxxVIV FATHIMAN
Local time: 10:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: Nice CV. Very well written, indeed. Welcome to ProZ.
11 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Lesley Clarke: I agree with tiny but not small
51 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Claire Chapman
5 hrs
  -> thank you
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
petite, small in stature, of diminutive size


Explanation:
I agree with many, if not most here. Petite denotes shorter and small-framed, small-boned, slender, etc. Diminutive is little, without implying anything possibly derogatory, though the author already refers to height specifically. Are we modifying the stated height OR are we referring to a small frame and less than 5' tall... Small in stature relates more to height.

Example sentence(s):
  • ... she was a large-eyed young woman, small in stature at less than five feet tall.
  • ... she was a large-eyed, petite young woman, and less than five feet tall.
Lorraine Lamont
United States
Local time: 11:55
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Oct 30, 2007 - Changes made by Will Matter:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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