KudoZ home » English » Linguistics

vocabulary and collocation

English translation: Comments, corrections and alternatives SEE BELOW

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
15:23 Nov 8, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: vocabulary and collocation
hundreds of civilians died in a war
--that is suspended since the year 2000
--that has come to a temporary ceasefire since the year 2000
--that is in suspense / in pause since the year 2000

I need to know what you think of the previous expressions as regards grammar and vocabulary. are they correct? Many thanks in advance.
Lakasa Stnorden
Local time: 22:54
English translation:Comments, corrections and alternatives SEE BELOW
Explanation:
Without the actual context of this war, some of these comments will be shots in the dark.
a war....that HAS BEEN suspended since...
a war ...that WAS suspended IN

The use of since + date requires the present perfect tense here. Alternatively you can use the simple past + date. But I am worried about "suspend" with "war". The verbs for war are normally: break out/begin ....and end is the only word which immediately comes to mind for direct collocation with war for cessation of hostilities.

Talks could be suspended, and there could be a suspension of hostilities also.

"There has come" - no. There + verb to be. So it would have to be *there has BEEN a temporary ceasefire... (delete TO from the original sentence also).
Alternatively: *an agreement for a ceasefire was come to in 2000*, but in this case you couldn't use since because we are talking about a specific moment in the past and not a period of time.

And I'm not at all happy about the third sentence - can't see how to rescue it all - maybe someone else is feeling more inspired.

Hope this all helps.
Selected response from:

Noni Gilbert
Spain
Local time: 03:54
Grading comment
thanks a lot!!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +3Comments, corrections and alternatives SEE BELOW
Noni Gilbert
4 +2see comments
Sheila Wilson
4Despite the ceasefire hundreds of civilians have died in this war since 2000.xxxcorbett bogd
3 +1How about?
jccantrell
3another two bits' worthKen Cox
3 -1which continues to be dormant since the year 2000
Roman Bardachev


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
which continues to be dormant since the year 2000


Explanation:
one way of saying it

Roman Bardachev
Canada
Local time: 19:54
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Sheila Wilson: You can't use the present tense with since
4 mins
  -> Thank you, Sheila
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Comments, corrections and alternatives SEE BELOW


Explanation:
Without the actual context of this war, some of these comments will be shots in the dark.
a war....that HAS BEEN suspended since...
a war ...that WAS suspended IN

The use of since + date requires the present perfect tense here. Alternatively you can use the simple past + date. But I am worried about "suspend" with "war". The verbs for war are normally: break out/begin ....and end is the only word which immediately comes to mind for direct collocation with war for cessation of hostilities.

Talks could be suspended, and there could be a suspension of hostilities also.

"There has come" - no. There + verb to be. So it would have to be *there has BEEN a temporary ceasefire... (delete TO from the original sentence also).
Alternatively: *an agreement for a ceasefire was come to in 2000*, but in this case you couldn't use since because we are talking about a specific moment in the past and not a period of time.

And I'm not at all happy about the third sentence - can't see how to rescue it all - maybe someone else is feeling more inspired.

Hope this all helps.

Noni Gilbert
Spain
Local time: 03:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
thanks a lot!!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Townshend
59 mins
  -> Thanks Patricia.

agree  Jack Doughty
1 hr
  -> Thank you Jack.

agree  Elena Aleksandrova
19 hrs
  -> Thank you Elena.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
see comments


Explanation:
You need to be careful of the tense with "since".

Your 2nd suggestion is the correct tense, but is grammatically incorrect because the since implies the period 2000 to now, and the coming to a ceasefire happened on one particular day in 2000.

Possible suggestions are:-
that has been in suspense since the year 2000
that has been in a state of ceasefire since the year 2000
that has been dormant since the year 2000

My personal choice would be the second, although another possibility would be to say:
.. died in a war, prior to a ceasfire in the year 2000


Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 02:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 31

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxcmwilliams: I also prefer your second example, but would say 'since 2000'
4 mins
  -> Thanks, I think I agree - I was following the asker's suggestion but "the year" is certainly optional

agree  Richard Benham: Lose the year unless you want it to sound like a translation from German, but otherwise all your suggestions are fine.
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Richard - I agree about "the year"
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
How about?


Explanation:
hundreds of civilians died in a war
--halted for a temporary ceasefire declared in 2000.

I really did not like any of your suggestions. I would think "temporary ceasefire" is the best phrase. I also do not like "year 2000" when it is plain that 2000 refers to the year.

My thoughts.

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 18:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 31

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn
12 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
another two bits' worth


Explanation:
Well, none of the proposed options is natural English.

As jcc mentioned, 'the year xxxx' is rather rare in English outside legal documents.

As acevelia suggested, we need to know more about the war and what specifically happened in 2000 to make any kind of useful suggestion(s).

One fairly journalistic way of wording this, if it fits, would be:

hundreds of civilians died in a war that has been slumbering since a truce in 2000

Ken Cox
Local time: 03:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 47
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Despite the ceasefire hundreds of civilians have died in this war since 2000.


Explanation:
another suggestion which clarifies the meaning

xxxcorbett bogd
Canada
Local time: 19:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Sheila Wilson: That's not necessarily the meaning I read into it - to me, it doesn't say that these people died after 2000
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search