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enter (into)

English translation: yes there's a difference

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:enter (into)
English translation:yes there's a difference
Entered by: lindaellen
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06:54 Mar 14, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / grammar
English term or phrase: enter (into)
Dear native English speakers!

Would someone explain to me the difference (if any) between ‘enter’ and ‘enter into’?
For example, which should I use in the following contexts:

A few travelers have come to a wall of rock with a narrow opening in it. Now, do they ENTER the opening or ENTER INTO the opening?

Or suppose someone (say, a magician) can go right through sheer walls of rock. Does he ENTER the wall or ENTER INTO the wall?

Is there a difference, anyway?

I’ll appreciate any help.
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 23:01
yes there's a difference
Explanation:
Using my experience as a native speaker, I would use "enter into" for something small or where the entering was extraordinary- like the narrow opening to emphasize that getting in is not that easy, whereas "she entered the room" is fine, as would be "she entered into the room *with flair* "to emphasize that the entering was special. An agreement is always "entered into". I wouldn't say that a magician enters into a wall at all, I would say that he passed through it.
Selected response from:

lindaellen
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your help Linda! Thanks everybody!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3enter into (phrasal verb)
Michael Iakovides
4 +3yes there's a differencelindaellen


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
yes there's a difference


Explanation:
Using my experience as a native speaker, I would use "enter into" for something small or where the entering was extraordinary- like the narrow opening to emphasize that getting in is not that easy, whereas "she entered the room" is fine, as would be "she entered into the room *with flair* "to emphasize that the entering was special. An agreement is always "entered into". I wouldn't say that a magician enters into a wall at all, I would say that he passed through it.

lindaellen
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your help Linda! Thanks everybody!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jack Doughty
15 mins

agree  orientalhorizon
58 mins

agree  V_N
10 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
enter into (phrasal verb)


Explanation:
Actually enter and enter into are two different things. If you wanted to use the verb enter, you would not use into with it because it basically means to come or go into. Enter into is a phrasal verb with a diffrent meaning alltogether.

See the link below has the exact definitions


    Reference: http://www.answers.com/topic/enter
Michael Iakovides
Local time: 19:01
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jim Tucker: yes - "enter into" is figurative, as "this factor does not enter into the equation" = does not play a role in...
4 hrs

agree  Olga Layer
7 hrs

agree  V_N: "enter into"= to start, participate, and so on.
10 days
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Changes made by editors
Mar 15, 2008 - Changes made by lindaellen:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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