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article?

English translation: in this case with article; use depends on context

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:article?
English translation:in this case with article; use depends on context
Entered by: Bernhard Sulzer
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

13:45 Aug 31, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: article?
A question for native speakers

projects mainly related to Internet. the Internet.
Is it correct to say Internet? without article? Or would it be better to use it?

Translating an article to be published in a bilingual booklet.
Thanks in advance.
Lakasa Stnorden
Local time: 02:10
comment
Explanation:
in your case with article; use depends on context

Referring to the Internet (capitalized) - especially as a stand-alone term or concept - you would mostly use the definite article in constructions such as yours.

However, it depends on context and sentence structure.

Example:
Internet means end for media barons, says Murdoch (headline)
see:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2006/mar/14/newmedia.student...


You would also use it without the article if Internet is part of a compound noun such as Internet development in constructions such as in the example below (see first link).

Exceptions: Murdoch is sure that the Internet development scheme is working. (narrative construction within a text, emphasis on "the scheme").
But as a headline it would read:
Murdoch is sure Internet development scheme is working
----------

http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=316572.358299
to Internet development and research
http://www.pharmweb.net/
This page contains information on pharmaceutical publications related to the Internet and considers the applications of the Internet to pharmacy.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 32 mins (2008-08-31 14:17:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

PS: Hope you don't mind me posting some information.:)
Selected response from:

Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 01:10
Grading comment
many thanks to all of you...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6the Internet
Robin Levey
3comment
Bernhard Sulzer


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
the Internet


Explanation:
As a native (UK) English speaker I always use the definite article and upper-case 'I' --> "the Internet".

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 02:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxcmwilliams
2 mins

agree  Ken Cox: unless it is used as an adjective, of course
3 mins

agree  Patricia Townshend
5 mins

agree  Jack Doughty
8 mins

agree  Adriana Grigorescu: I am not a native speaker but I am pretty sure it is "to the Internet", unless, as Ken said, it is used as an adjective, i.e. "related to Internet games". Regards
13 mins

agree  Gary D
14 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
comment


Explanation:
in your case with article; use depends on context

Referring to the Internet (capitalized) - especially as a stand-alone term or concept - you would mostly use the definite article in constructions such as yours.

However, it depends on context and sentence structure.

Example:
Internet means end for media barons, says Murdoch (headline)
see:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2006/mar/14/newmedia.student...


You would also use it without the article if Internet is part of a compound noun such as Internet development in constructions such as in the example below (see first link).

Exceptions: Murdoch is sure that the Internet development scheme is working. (narrative construction within a text, emphasis on "the scheme").
But as a headline it would read:
Murdoch is sure Internet development scheme is working
----------

http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=316572.358299
to Internet development and research
http://www.pharmweb.net/
This page contains information on pharmaceutical publications related to the Internet and considers the applications of the Internet to pharmacy.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 32 mins (2008-08-31 14:17:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

PS: Hope you don't mind me posting some information.:)

Bernhard Sulzer
United States
Local time: 01:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 6
Grading comment
many thanks to all of you...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ken Cox: newspapers have their own style rules, which are largely driven by the need to minimise space requirements and tend to be produce more or less telegraphic text (especially for headlines). Generally speaking, they are not appropriate in other contexts.
6 mins
  -> I agree. It's a special context/style.
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Changes made by editors
Sep 1, 2008 - Changes made by Bernhard Sulzer:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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