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expression

English translation: Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore

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21:08 Sep 3, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: expression
Native help.

Suppose you are in a another country surrounded by people speaking a language different from yours, and you are tired of this, you want to hear something in your language. And you find a friend from your country. So, you want him to say an expression as Brittish or American as possible that makes you feel as if you were at home. Please say something very Brittish that make me forget I'm sorrounded by people speaking a different language. In Argentina we would say: por favor diganme lo más gauchesco que se les ocurra. What would you say in English? Thank you.
Lakasa Stnorden
Local time: 05:50
English translation:Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore
Explanation:
This famous expression actually means the very opposite, but it renders the feeling that you and this other person are in a completely strange and alien place, thereby creating a kind of bond between you.
Selected response from:

Mark Berelekhis
United States
Local time: 04:50
Grading comment
I think both media and Mark have provided good examples. thank you very much!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +5Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore
Mark Berelekhis
3 +2Fancy a pint of Guinness, chum?
Robin Levey


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore


Explanation:
This famous expression actually means the very opposite, but it renders the feeling that you and this other person are in a completely strange and alien place, thereby creating a kind of bond between you.

Mark Berelekhis
United States
Local time: 04:50
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 38
Grading comment
I think both media and Mark have provided good examples. thank you very much!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Demi Ebrite: I have lived with the legacy of this expression forever! "I have a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore is universally understood by Americans'; I don't know of a Brittish expression that would make the same connection ~
9 mins
  -> Thank you, debrite :)

agree  Marie Scarano: from one of my fav ourite films!
20 mins
  -> Thank you, Marie. It's the first book I've ever read; rather, the Russian version of this book ;)

agree  Heather Shaw
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Heather.

neutral  Patricia Townshend: This wouldn't, however, be applicable to Britain. The same of course applies to mediamatrix's suggestion but the other way round. I can't think of a universal one though.
10 hrs
  -> Agreed, don't think there's a universal one, the cultures are too different.

agree  Bernhard Sulzer: there wouldn't be a universal one - that would defeat its purpose - of recognizing a "fellow" Englishman or American (IMO) - even though it's English, only a particular accent will bring about this feeling - esp. today where English is spoken everywhere.
11 hrs
  -> Thank you, Bernhard. Well put.

agree  Ioanna Daskalopoulou
1 day1 hr
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Fancy a pint of Guinness, chum?


Explanation:
I'll tell you a true story...
I was in Atlanta, Georgia, attending a conference. There were about 400 delegates - all from the US except me ... and a guy from Dublin.
We all spoke 'English', but at the end of the day's sessions, just as I was heading for my hotel in the hopes of getting away from the raucous noise and jarring accents that had assailed my ears all day, I heard a soft, lilting voice behind me: "Fancy a pint of Guinness, chum?"
Better still, he knew where it find it - in 'Atlanta Underground'!

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Note added at 2 hrs (2008-09-04 00:03:50 GMT)
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Ooops! - forgot to mention (for those who don't already know...): I'm from England and my saviour from Dublin was ... well, Irish, I guess!

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 05:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christine Andersen: If you want something European English ;-) as opposed to American, this would warm most people's hearts! But my generation at least (born in the 50s) recognise the Kansas allusion but not the same way.
7 hrs

neutral  Patricia Townshend: See my note to Mark.
7 hrs

agree  Bernhard Sulzer: there wouldn't be a universal one - that would defeat its purpose - of recognizing a "fellow" Englishman (or European native English speaker) or American or Argentine for that matter (IMO)
8 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Sep 4, 2008 - Changes made by Mark Berelekhis:
FieldOther » Art/Literary


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