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BCE and CE

English translation: bce and ce

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19:07 Nov 12, 2003
English to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: BCE and CE
I'm working on a translation that uses the equivalent of BCE in Italian, but then goes on to use AD.
I've found a number of websites that use BCE and AD, rather than BCE and CE.
I'd like to hear your opinions on this.
Thanks!

FWI, I found this interesting reference on the topic
http://www.radix.net/~dglenn/defs/ce.html
Catherine Bolton
Local time: 02:24
English translation:bce and ce
Explanation:
I'd go with bce and ce, for consitency — unless there is a special reason not to.

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Note added at 2 mins (2003-11-12 19:10:02 GMT)
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BCE and CE
Selected response from:

ntext
United States
Local time: 19:24
Grading comment
Thanks folks. Your comments were quite interesting! I opted for BCE / CE.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5bce and centext
5BC and ADGordon Darroch
5Consistency in such matters matters.Fuad Yahya
4BCE and AD
Mario Marcolin


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
bce and ce
bce and ce


Explanation:
I'd go with bce and ce, for consitency — unless there is a special reason not to.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 mins (2003-11-12 19:10:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

BCE and CE

ntext
United States
Local time: 19:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Thanks folks. Your comments were quite interesting! I opted for BCE / CE.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Moore: Consi*s*tency....
8 mins

agree  Sarah Ponting
15 mins

agree  jccantrell
1 hr

agree  chopra_2002
6 hrs

agree  vixen
15 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Consistency in such matters matters.


Explanation:
The inconsistency you have noticed may have been the result of an editing effort that did not scrutinize the whole piece. If appropriate, you may want to contact the agency/client and ask if they would prefer to leave the inconsistency as is or massage it in the translation.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
BC and AD


Explanation:
these are the "traditional" terms used in English before the more secular BCE and CE started making headway. BC - Before Christ, AD - Anno Domini; why one's in English and the other's in Latin is something I've never understood.

Gordon Darroch
Local time: 01:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
bce and ce
BCE and AD


Explanation:
It may not be politically correct but I think it's better to recognize diversity rather than to try to make everything fit into one conceptual scheme.
AD belongs to a Christian tradition on time reckoning, no matter when J.C. was actually born, just as the reckoning of time relative to the Hajira is a part of Islam.

The fact that many take the Christian reckoning for granted, and that it is useful in many parts of everyday life should not allow us to make this into some default mother of all reckoning systems.

People do belong inside traditions, and real tolerance comes from respecting the traditions of your neighbours as well their religion(s)..

And who knows, some of us may still be reckoning time by Ab Urbe Condita?

;-)

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Note added at 1 day 13 hrs 2 mins (2003-11-14 08:09:28 GMT)
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in other words:

It\'s perfectly natural to use AD, the established term, alongside with BCE...


Mario Marcolin
Sweden
Local time: 02:24
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Jun 17, 2005 - Changes made by ntext:
Field (specific)(none) » Linguistics


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