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in the eve of vs. on the eve of

English translation: One kind of use of "in the eve of" is certainly correct, and is semantically different from "on the"

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13:30 Jun 24, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Linguistics
English term or phrase: in the eve of vs. on the eve of
What is the semantic difference between the two?
Zdenka Ivkovcic
Croatia
Local time: 01:27
English translation:One kind of use of "in the eve of" is certainly correct, and is semantically different from "on the"
Explanation:
consider:

http://www.lasalle.edu/~garver/babette.htm
TABLE Of PLENTY
Some remarks on the film Babette's Feast
S. Joel Garver
He had left the village many years before, saying to the sister he loved, "I shall never, never see you again! For I have learned here that Fate is hard, and that in this world there are things which are impossible!" He then embarked upon a military career in which he pursued wealth, reputation, and power, with much success. And yet, in the eve of his life he calls it all into question.

http://victorian.fortunecity.com/whistler/23/essay.html

Essays on Victorian Literature

Fate and Chance in The Mayor of Casterbridge

he means that his heart is still throbbing with the desires of youth or "noontide" while he unfortunately is in the eve of his life

http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV232-Gen11.htm
http://www.bcg.org/Program_Notes/bach_1103.html
Bach’s Mass in B minor

Bach might well have used the musical idiom in the closing of this Mass as a personal message, that in the eve of his own life, he was grateful to have attained an almost mystical depth of inner peace, both within himself and with the rest of the universe.

http://www.thesolnet.com/articles.htm
The Solutions Network - Articles & Musings

Keep in mind that Baby Boomers who started their businesses 20 or 25 years ago are beginning to think about their exit strategies. They’re getting counsel from lawyers, financial planners, accountants, trust officers and other consultants who have a stake in succession planning,
but have also seen what happens when executives
in the eve of their careers
run out of time to plan for a smooth, tax effective transition. So I think the word is spreading through an entire generation of business owners that there’s more to succession planning than just naming a family member or a trusted employee to take over.”


When it is used like this,
it doesn't mean literally 'the night before' ('on the eve of St.Crispin's day') or more generally 'the time/period just before some event, era or change ('on the eve of the First World War').

Instead
it means a time or period towards the end of something - when it is not over but entering a stage nearer the end than the beginning, with particular characteristics which can be likened to the evening period in day and night / dawn & nightfall.

Eve used for evening (eventide/even) is said to be archaic, but sometimes contemporary writing still make good use of the expression.


Another situation where "in the eve of", for the period just before something, is met a lot is in sentences like "in the eve of conference negotiations" - but that's because the 'in' is referring to the 'eve of conference negotiations' rather tha just the eve.











--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 5 mins (2004-06-25 10:36:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...but sometimes contemporary writing still makeS good use of the expression...\'


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 6 mins (2004-06-25 10:37:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...in day and night / between dawn & nightfall.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 7 mins (2004-06-25 10:38:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...rather thaN just the eve.\'


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 9 mins (2004-06-25 10:40:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...it means DURING a time or period towards the end of something ...\'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 2 hrs 37 mins (2004-06-25 16:08:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

consider,
\'on the eve of her best years\' (just before the best years begin)
and
\'in the eve of her best years\' (during a later period of those best years, being likened to their evening, in the well known expression).

If \'in\' is used for both it would be confusing which was meant, even with context, sometimes

I would suggest that, \'on the eve\' is \"when the eve [of something] has come, when the eve comes, or when the eve will come\" - while \'in the eve\' is \"during the eve\", but is usually used just for \"later stage\" eve I have talked about (and perhaps the reason for that is, by accident or design, it avoids confusion).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 2 hrs 38 mins (2004-06-25 16:09:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...but is usually used just for THE \"later stage\" eve I have talked about...\'
Selected response from:

DGK T-I
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:27
Grading comment
Thank you very much for all your effort.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +16"on" is correct, "in" is incorrectxxxIanW
5 +6on the eve of is correct English
jgal
4 +2on the eve ofxxx
5Present Tense & Past TenseRamesh Madhavan
4One kind of use of "in the eve of" is certainly correct, and is semantically different from "on the"
DGK T-I
4 -3both possible
Cilian O'Tuama


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +16
"on" is correct, "in" is incorrect


Explanation:
As far as I know - and I may be wrong - "on" is correct, "in" is incorrect

xxxIanW
Local time: 01:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Amy Williams: 'in' is just plain wrong...although Cilian's got me thinking!
2 mins

agree  Elena Petelos
2 mins

agree  Rowan Morrell: Right on! :-)
4 mins

agree  xxx: Sorry, in the middle of writing when you posted, yes, I agree
4 mins

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
5 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
19 mins

disagree  Cilian O'Tuama: As far as I know - and I may be wrong - "in" is NOT incorrect (Gruß)
19 mins
  -> Well if it is, it's new to me (Gruß back atcha)

agree  David Moore
25 mins

agree  Tahir
38 mins

agree  xxxcmwilliams
43 mins

agree  RHELLER: hey Ian :-)
52 mins

agree  Enza Longo
55 mins

agree  vixen
1 hr

agree  Tony M
2 hrs

agree  ggrozoma
2 hrs

agree  Charlie Bavington: Altho I would be less dogmatic about stuff like use of prepositions, and would be inclined perhaps talk about standard usage rather than correctness :-)
3 hrs

agree  xxxtazdog
5 hrs

agree  Java Cafe
8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
on the eve of is correct English


Explanation:
"in the evening" would make sense, or "on the eve" (meaning the night before).

"In the eve" is not English.

jgal
Local time: 01:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Amy Williams
1 min

agree  Elena Petelos
2 mins

agree  xxx: I agree
4 mins

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
5 mins

agree  Aoife Kennedy
10 mins

disagree  Cilian O'Tuama: IMO "In the eve" IS English
21 mins
  -> I beg to differ...

agree  xxxcmwilliams
43 mins

agree  Enza Longo
55 mins

agree  ggrozoma
2 hrs

disagree  DGK T-I: "in the eve" is certainly correct English, used in at least one (semantically different) way, anyway (see elsewhere), regardless of Cilian's answer ~
23 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
on the eve of


Explanation:
I'm pretty sure that 'in' is incorrect for 'the eve of'. There are 'google hits' I know, but I'm sure it is incorrect. OED quotes 'on the eve of' and this is the usage that I am familiar with.

xxx
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Peter Linton: Definitely. In any case, most of the Google hits for "in the eve" demonstrate convincingly that it is not normal English usage. thus supporting the OED.
32 mins
  -> Thanks Lars. I agree about Google - a dangerous tool indeed!

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
7 days
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -3
both possible


Explanation:
eve has two meanings
1) the evening/day before sth.
2) a period preceding sth.

on the eve therefore means "during the day before"
and
in the eve means "during the period preceding"

Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 01:27
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  David Moore: IMO, your conclusion is incorrect; "in" the eve is just not used.
19 mins
  -> looks like we're not going to come to an agreement on this one, c'est la vie

disagree  jgal: I'm with David on this one.
27 mins
  -> Be my guest, but I beg to differ too :-)

neutral  Christine Andersen: In a lot of the hits Eve or eve is a person or an acronym, e.g. 'embedded vector editor'. To me in the eve sounds like lame attempts at poetry! One of those expressions I personally would avoid, even if it was found in the Bible, Shakespeare and the OED.
34 mins

disagree  ggrozoma: :-) I just looked, and it's NOT in the Bible, Shakespeare or the OED.
2 hrs
  -> did I say it was? (oh, ye of little faith :-))

neutral  Charlie Bavington: Agree with your 2 meanings for eve. Can see what you're driving at. Am struggling, however, to come up with a phrase where you could use it without it jarring. Use it in a phrase with, say "in the eve of Euro 2004" or "in the eve of WW2" & convince me!
3 hrs
  -> is it worth the bother? I'm outnumbered, but... ;-) //Hey Mr B after so long, try "in the eve of the" + "elections". Sorry for taking 12 years to reply. Seems like yesterday :-)

neutral  DGK T-I: in the eve is certainly used to mean during a later(evening-like) stage of something - so it isn't right to say 'in the eve of' isn't used in one way or another. I wonder if it isn't favoured for 'during the period/evening just before' to avoid confusion?
23 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Present Tense & Past Tense


Explanation:
'eve' is the short form of 'Evening'. You use "in the eve" in present tense when describing some thing that is happening and "on the eve" in past tense when describing some thing that has happened.

Ramesh Madhavan
Local time: 04:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TamilTamil
PRO pts in category: 7
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
One kind of use of "in the eve of" is certainly correct, and is semantically different from "on the"


Explanation:
consider:

http://www.lasalle.edu/~garver/babette.htm
TABLE Of PLENTY
Some remarks on the film Babette's Feast
S. Joel Garver
He had left the village many years before, saying to the sister he loved, "I shall never, never see you again! For I have learned here that Fate is hard, and that in this world there are things which are impossible!" He then embarked upon a military career in which he pursued wealth, reputation, and power, with much success. And yet, in the eve of his life he calls it all into question.

http://victorian.fortunecity.com/whistler/23/essay.html

Essays on Victorian Literature

Fate and Chance in The Mayor of Casterbridge

he means that his heart is still throbbing with the desires of youth or "noontide" while he unfortunately is in the eve of his life

http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV232-Gen11.htm
http://www.bcg.org/Program_Notes/bach_1103.html
Bach’s Mass in B minor

Bach might well have used the musical idiom in the closing of this Mass as a personal message, that in the eve of his own life, he was grateful to have attained an almost mystical depth of inner peace, both within himself and with the rest of the universe.

http://www.thesolnet.com/articles.htm
The Solutions Network - Articles & Musings

Keep in mind that Baby Boomers who started their businesses 20 or 25 years ago are beginning to think about their exit strategies. They’re getting counsel from lawyers, financial planners, accountants, trust officers and other consultants who have a stake in succession planning,
but have also seen what happens when executives
in the eve of their careers
run out of time to plan for a smooth, tax effective transition. So I think the word is spreading through an entire generation of business owners that there’s more to succession planning than just naming a family member or a trusted employee to take over.”


When it is used like this,
it doesn't mean literally 'the night before' ('on the eve of St.Crispin's day') or more generally 'the time/period just before some event, era or change ('on the eve of the First World War').

Instead
it means a time or period towards the end of something - when it is not over but entering a stage nearer the end than the beginning, with particular characteristics which can be likened to the evening period in day and night / dawn & nightfall.

Eve used for evening (eventide/even) is said to be archaic, but sometimes contemporary writing still make good use of the expression.


Another situation where "in the eve of", for the period just before something, is met a lot is in sentences like "in the eve of conference negotiations" - but that's because the 'in' is referring to the 'eve of conference negotiations' rather tha just the eve.











--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 5 mins (2004-06-25 10:36:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...but sometimes contemporary writing still makeS good use of the expression...\'


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 6 mins (2004-06-25 10:37:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...in day and night / between dawn & nightfall.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 7 mins (2004-06-25 10:38:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...rather thaN just the eve.\'


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 9 mins (2004-06-25 10:40:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...it means DURING a time or period towards the end of something ...\'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 2 hrs 37 mins (2004-06-25 16:08:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

consider,
\'on the eve of her best years\' (just before the best years begin)
and
\'in the eve of her best years\' (during a later period of those best years, being likened to their evening, in the well known expression).

If \'in\' is used for both it would be confusing which was meant, even with context, sometimes

I would suggest that, \'on the eve\' is \"when the eve [of something] has come, when the eve comes, or when the eve will come\" - while \'in the eve\' is \"during the eve\", but is usually used just for \"later stage\" eve I have talked about (and perhaps the reason for that is, by accident or design, it avoids confusion).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 2 hrs 38 mins (2004-06-25 16:09:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo. \'...but is usually used just for THE \"later stage\" eve I have talked about...\'

DGK T-I
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:27
Works in field
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you very much for all your effort.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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