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punctuation query

English translation: the solid curve corresponds to XXX, the dashed curve to YYY, and the dotted curve to ZZZ.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:punctuation query
English translation:the solid curve corresponds to XXX, the dashed curve to YYY, and the dotted curve to ZZZ.
Entered by: Kevin Kelly
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20:48 Aug 7, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: punctuation query
In Fig. 1, the solid curve corresponds to XXX, the dashed curve corresponds to YYY, and the dotted curve corresponds to ZZZ.

Obviously, we can omit the second and third "corresponds." But I'm not sure which punctuation marks should be used instead. Please explain
Nik-On/Off
Ukraine
Local time: 07:58
the solid curve corresponds to XXX, the dashed curve to YYY, and the dotted curve to ZZZ.
Explanation:
Omit the second and third "corresponds" and leave the punctuation as is.
Selected response from:

Kevin Kelly
Local time: 00:58
Grading comment
Thanks to all of you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +11the solid curve corresponds to XXX, the dashed curve to YYY, and the dotted curve to ZZZ.
Kevin Kelly
5This is a typical case of "serial" comma
humbird
4no comma before a conjunction
Madeleine MacRae Klintebo


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +11
the solid curve corresponds to XXX, the dashed curve to YYY, and the dotted curve to ZZZ.


Explanation:
Omit the second and third "corresponds" and leave the punctuation as is.

Kevin Kelly
Local time: 00:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks to all of you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jack Doughty
3 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  David Knowles: The comma before "and" is optional, but it seems clearer to leave it in (maybe because of the ellipsis in removing "corresponds")
19 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  Refugio: The comma before 'and' is not optional. It belongs there.
45 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  Zoya ayoz
2 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  humbird: Kevin is righ. Ruth is also right. The second comma before "and" is vital as it signifies itemization of three different things namely XXX, YYY, and ZZZ. In this case "and" tells the reader "This is the last of the list".
3 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Jörgen Slet
3 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
6 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Lesley Clayton
8 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Armorel Young
10 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  David Moore
12 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Dr Andrew Read: But note to Susan - a slight difference in UK/US usage here. In US you need the comma in such a list; in the UK it's optional and is disapproved of by some (though I would use it)!
17 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
no comma before a conjunction


Explanation:
No comma before 'and' in British English. Comma before and, but etc is very American.

Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SwedishSwedish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  humbird: Well I have to agree with you as I don't know much about Queen's English. Then, how do you differentiate "XX", "YY" and "ZZ" whereas XX and YY don't belong to same category? Please see my comment to Kevin.
1 hr
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
This is a typical case of "serial" comma


Explanation:
Correct answer is already given by Kevin, but I would like to add a "scientific" ground , in case you are wondering why that's the case.
According to a book called "The Elements of Style" by William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White, this comma is often called "serial" comma, because it is used when you are citing thre or more things in a single conjunction (this means in "serial"). The books says "use a comma after each term except the last".
Hence, you write "red, white, and blue" or "gold, silver, or copper".

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Note added at 6 hrs 48 mins (2004-08-08 03:37:04 GMT)
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Therefore, if you said \"red, white, blue and white, and blue, there are only four colors, not five. Namely, red, white, bluish white - or whitish blue or even blue and white stripes, then blue. It is for this reason I believe Madeleine is incorrect.
My answer was added after my comments to two previous answers. This is called \"afterthought\".

humbird
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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