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Comma after "Hi" / "Hello" and "Regards" etc.?

English translation: No / Yes

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16:29 Sep 9, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / Punctuation
English term or phrase: Comma after "Hi" / "Hello" and "Regards" etc.?
(1)
Most people who drop me a line simply write “Hi/Hello Christian!”. However, there are also some guys who write “Hi/Hello, Christian”. Why do they use a comma here? Is it correct to use a comma after “Hi” and “Hello” when addressing people?

(2)
I often sign my letters with the words “Regards Christian”. What about comma usage? Would it also be correct to write “Regards, Christian”?

Are there any websites which shed some light on it?

Thanks a lot for your help in advance.

Regards / Regards,
Christian
Christian
Local time: 18:50
English translation:No / Yes
Explanation:
You don't need a comma in "Hello Christian", though you need one after:

Hello Christian,...

You do need it in

Sincerely,

Christian

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Note added at 12 mins (2004-09-09 16:41:07 GMT)
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According to this site, you do need the comma in the first example:

3. After \"good morning\" or similar salutation or phrase:

* good morning , Mister Smith .
* how are you , Susi .


http://www.is.cs.cmu.edu/trl_conventions/punctuation.html

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Note added at 14 mins (2004-09-09 16:43:41 GMT)
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Here is another example, I guess technically, you DO need the comma:
I often receive e-mails that begin with the following greeting: \"Hi Rachel.\" Although this is certainly a friendly way to begin a letter, it violates one of the many comma rules: Always use a comma when directly addressing someone/something, regardless of whether the direct address is at the beginning or end of the sentence. If the direct address is in the middle of a sentence, use a pair of commas to set off the direct address. Note the placement of commas in the example sentences below:

Example 1: Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention please? (Direct address at beginning of sentence)
Example 2: It was a pleasure to meet you, Sir. (Direct address at end of sentence)
Example 3: Thank you, my fellow grammarians, for remembering to use correct English. (Direct address in middle of sentence)

So, you see, the salutation \"Hi Rachel\" should be \"Hi, Rachel.\" A comma is needed between Hi and Rachel because it is a direct address.
http://www.grammarerrors.com/punctuation.html
Selected response from:

David Russi
United States
Local time: 10:50
Grading comment
Hi, David, thanks a lot for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +10No / Yes
David Russi
4 +1Use comma, Christian! :)
Kirill Semenov
4FYIRHELLER


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
comma after
No / Yes


Explanation:
You don't need a comma in "Hello Christian", though you need one after:

Hello Christian,...

You do need it in

Sincerely,

Christian

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2004-09-09 16:41:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

According to this site, you do need the comma in the first example:

3. After \"good morning\" or similar salutation or phrase:

* good morning , Mister Smith .
* how are you , Susi .


http://www.is.cs.cmu.edu/trl_conventions/punctuation.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2004-09-09 16:43:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is another example, I guess technically, you DO need the comma:
I often receive e-mails that begin with the following greeting: \"Hi Rachel.\" Although this is certainly a friendly way to begin a letter, it violates one of the many comma rules: Always use a comma when directly addressing someone/something, regardless of whether the direct address is at the beginning or end of the sentence. If the direct address is in the middle of a sentence, use a pair of commas to set off the direct address. Note the placement of commas in the example sentences below:

Example 1: Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention please? (Direct address at beginning of sentence)
Example 2: It was a pleasure to meet you, Sir. (Direct address at end of sentence)
Example 3: Thank you, my fellow grammarians, for remembering to use correct English. (Direct address in middle of sentence)

So, you see, the salutation \"Hi Rachel\" should be \"Hi, Rachel.\" A comma is needed between Hi and Rachel because it is a direct address.
http://www.grammarerrors.com/punctuation.html

David Russi
United States
Local time: 10:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 21
Grading comment
Hi, David, thanks a lot for your help.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Aisha Maniar
2 mins

agree  Kurt Porter
14 mins

agree  Marijke Singer: I think the reason why people do not put a comma in "Hi Christian" is because the "hi" has replaced "Dear" and after "Dear" you do not use a comma (formal letter writing).
20 mins

agree  Laurel Porter: Nice citations! This is a problem with e-mail: It's very quick & casual (no capitals, etc.), & speech-like in form. This perpetuates in writing shortcuts that would normally never be used. Nice point, Marijke!
21 mins

agree  verbis
35 mins

agree  Tehani
2 hrs

agree  senin
4 hrs

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
10 hrs

agree  Ramesh Madhavan
10 hrs

agree  le flaneur: 'Hi,' in a greeting does not do the same work as 'Dear.' 'Dear' modifies the name of the addressee. 'Hi," doesn't. ('My dear Smith.' 'Hello, my Dear.)
3063 days
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
comma after
Use comma, Christian! :)


Explanation:
.

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Note added at 27 mins (2004-09-09 16:56:29 GMT)
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I would say that you do need a comma to separate the name as an addressing form.

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Note added at 29 mins (2004-09-09 16:58:38 GMT)
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And at the end of your letter, when you say \"Regards\", etc., the comma shows that you sending this final wishes or addressing not to yourself but to your addressee.

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 19:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  eccotraduttrice: yep!
2 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
comma after
FYI


Explanation:
2. The Greeting. The greeting always ends with a comma. The greeting may be formal, beginning with the word "dear" and using the person's given name or relationship, or it may be informal if appropriate.


Formal: Dear Uncle Jim, Dear Mr. Wilkins,
Informal: Hi Joe, Greetings,

5. The signature line. Type or print your name. The handwritten signature goes above this line and below the close. The signature line and the handwritten signature are indented to the same column as the close. The signature should be written in blue or black ink. If the letter is quite informal, you may omit the signature line as long as you sign the letter.

Use commas after the salutation (also called the greeting) in a personal letter and after the complimentary closing in all letters.



Salutation:
Dear Fred,
My dearest Emmeline,

Closing:

Sincerely,
Truly yours,




    Reference: http://englishplus.com/grammar/00000143.htm
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 10:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 59
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