KudoZ home » English » Linguistics

Go native

English translation: Immerse oneself in the local culture, often to the shock of those from whose culture you originally came

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Go native
English translation:Immerse oneself in the local culture, often to the shock of those from whose culture you originally came
Entered by: Berni Armstrong
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

04:42 Dec 3, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: Go native
I understand this is MOSTLY British English, and rather of historical context (that means not used often, especially politically correct, modern times).
It is for this reason I really like to have British colleagues' opinion about this expression. Of course I would also like to solicit any professional's (non-Brithish, that is) opinion just as well. Any insight will be highly appreciated.
humbird
Immerse into the local culture
Explanation:
It is very American too. When I was stationed in the Phillippines back in the late '70s, I attempted to learn the language, make friends, loved the food, and learned as much as I could about the people and culture. My mono-linguistic friends (who were McDonald's kind of guys), jokingly said I'd "gone native." Same thing happened to a lesser extent in Japan in the early "90s. I looked at it as more of an attempt to express admiration for the cultural immersion attempt. I didn't feel any derision.
Selected response from:

Kurt Porter
Local time: 06:16
Grading comment
Thank you Kurt for your very empirical insight. Thank you all who gave comments to his answer. I realized it is not a dead expression and yes it is not negative any more. I also found it interesting nobody mentioned "marrying to a local woman". On flipside Alaa's answer is so interesting to see such a twist in super-modern setting. Thank you all.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +15Immerse into the local culture
Kurt Porter
5 +3to adopt the lifestyle of the local population, especially when it appears less civilized
Paula Vaz-Carreiro
5 +1a person who is in a foreign country goes native, they begin to live and/or dress like the people..
airmailrpl
3 +1when in Rome do as the Romans
Jonathan MacKerron
3Used frequently in IT
Alaa Zeineldine


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +15
go native
Immerse into the local culture


Explanation:
It is very American too. When I was stationed in the Phillippines back in the late '70s, I attempted to learn the language, make friends, loved the food, and learned as much as I could about the people and culture. My mono-linguistic friends (who were McDonald's kind of guys), jokingly said I'd "gone native." Same thing happened to a lesser extent in Japan in the early "90s. I looked at it as more of an attempt to express admiration for the cultural immersion attempt. I didn't feel any derision.

Kurt Porter
Local time: 06:16
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you Kurt for your very empirical insight. Thank you all who gave comments to his answer. I realized it is not a dead expression and yes it is not negative any more. I also found it interesting nobody mentioned "marrying to a local woman". On flipside Alaa's answer is so interesting to see such a twist in super-modern setting. Thank you all.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Judith Kerman: Definitely still in use, although it does seem less pejorative than it originally was. In its original time, I think it implied treason against one's own culture.
35 mins
  -> Judith, thank you.

agree  Teresa Reinhardt: Still used in the US in the context of International Education; see Kurt's explanation. Can be used with positive _and_ negative overtones
50 mins
  -> Thank you, Teresa. As I stated above, when the term was applied to me, I looked at it as some positive admiration, perhaps tinged with a bit of jealousy. Of course, that could be me just in denial. :)

agree  Rusinterp
59 mins
  -> Thank you, Alexandra.

agree  zax
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Zax.

agree  RHELLER: immersed in
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Rita...

agree  Kevin Kelly: Still widely used in the US.
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Kevin.

agree  Derek Gill Franßen: And I thought this was MOSTLY American English... ;-)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Derek! To tell you the truth, me too. I'd never really stopped to consider the British roots/connections.

agree  tappi_k
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, tappitkarrassk.

agree  Asghar Bhatti
6 hrs
  -> Thank you, Asghar.

agree  Tony M: Yes, and I agree with Judith et al that although once rather pejorative, these days it may also be regarded as positive; think of holiday brochures! And I can confirm BE historical usage...
7 hrs
  -> Dusty, appreciate the input and thank you!

agree  Jörgen Slet
8 hrs
  -> Thank you, Jurgen.

agree  vankovak
8 hrs
  -> Thank you, vankovak.

agree  Java Cafe
10 hrs
  -> Thank you, Java, Cafe.

agree  Eva Olsson: Often mildly derogatory, but not always.
11 hrs
  -> Thank you, Eva.

agree  airmailrpl: -
1 day23 mins
  -> Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
go native
Used frequently in IT


Explanation:
In the context of computers and IT, the phrase is used when switching to the native mode of a product or an operating system. This is native mode vs. virtual, emulation, or compatibility modes.

For example, a site may buy a 64 bit PC, but continue to run the operating system in 32 bit emulation mode, otherwise most of their applications may not run. Whenever the apps are ready (or done away with), the site can then "go native", i.e. change the operating system mode to native 64 bit mode. This is just one example. HTH!

Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 03:16
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Judith Kerman: Cool. Obviously an adaptation of the idea to a new situation.
4 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
go native
a person who is in a foreign country goes native, they begin to live and/or dress like the people..


Explanation:
go native
If a person who is in a foreign country goes native, they begin to live and/or dress like the people who live there.
http://www.freesearch.co.uk/dictionary/go native

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 22:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  trautlady: yes, and some even start to think like the natives
16 hrs
  -> thank you
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
go native
when in Rome do as the Romans


Explanation:
hackneyed but apt

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
go native
to adopt the lifestyle of the local population, especially when it appears less civilized


Explanation:
The answers so far give the correct meaning of the expression but I'd like to add that I have always understood it to mean 'becoming (in their ways, dress, lifestyle) like the local population, ESPECIALLY when it appears less civilized'.
(I've just checked the Collins and it says the same)
HTH

Paula Vaz-Carreiro
Local time: 02:16
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Jorgen

agree  Mathew Robinson
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Deborah Workman
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Deborah
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search