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to be on a bender

English translation: to go on a drinking binge

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:to be on a bender
English translation:to go on a drinking binge
Entered by: Neil Phillipson
Options:
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17:17 Dec 4, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Linguistics / UK - Nottinghamshire
English term or phrase: to be on a bender
I suppose it means that someone drinks heavily

My question is: would people use this phrase in Nottinghamshire?
Miroslawa Jodlowiec
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:08
Nottinghamshire no problem - to go on a binge
Explanation:
To my mind there's no reason why not. Although I'm fairly sure that this phrase is not particular to Nottinghamshire.

'To be a bender' rather than drinking heavily means to go on a drinking 'binge', perhaps there is a good excuse for it, a birthday or special occasion, but then again many people do not need an excuse to go on a bender, as our media are happy to point out to us these days.

I hope it helps,
Neil.

p.s. I'm not from Nottinghamshire, but from Manchester (also in the norther part of England). Perhaps if someone is from there, they could confirm this phrase as being used there.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2004-12-09 16:46:52 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

to be on a bender, of course
Selected response from:

Neil Phillipson
Local time: 20:08
Grading comment
Thanks to all very much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6to be on a drinking spree
Paula Vaz-Carreiro
5 +2lots of uk sites using "on a bender"
airmailrpl
4 +3Nottinghamshire no problem - to go on a binge
Neil Phillipson
5 -1They'd say "go out on a bender"zaphod


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
lots of uk sites using "on a bender"


Explanation:
Results 1 - 30 of about 1,190 English pages for "on a bender" site:uk.

people.co.uk - BLISS & TEL FOR BLUES
... heading for the high street. No wonder. Their side disintegrated faster than Prince Harry on a bender. And within the hour Lampard ...
www.people.co.uk/sport/tm_objectid=14922004& method=full&siteid=55768&headline=bliss---tel-for

Chapatti's over
... With her marriage to cheerful Alfie on the rocks (as in vodka on the rocks), Kat hits the bottle and takes daughter Zoe on a bender which takes them from ...
www.thisisthenortheast.co.uk/ the_north_east/entertainment/SOAPWATCH4.html

Poetry Corner
... Who is Prudence, what is she, That Gordon did commend her? Did she lose her virginity Or go out on a bender? That denièd she might be.
www.numberwatch.co.uk/owed.htm

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 16:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jonathan MacKerron: a bender is a bender is a bender...
47 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
8 hrs
  -> thank you
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
to be on a drinking spree


Explanation:
In yorkshire they say it. I would say it is an expression used all over the UK.
HTH

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Note added at 10 mins (2004-12-04 17:27:38 GMT)
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I\'ve heard used in relation to other excesses.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 28 mins (2004-12-04 17:46:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The Collins defines \'a bender\' as a \'drinking bout\'

Paula Vaz-Carreiro
Local time: 20:08
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn: Canada, too
2 mins
  -> Thanks Nancy

agree  David Knowles
2 mins
  -> Thanks David

agree  Hermann: Cheers!
6 mins
  -> Thanks Hermann

agree  RHELLER: spree is good - even in the U.S. !
8 mins
  -> Thanks Rita

agree  Enza Longo: We use it in Montreal, Canada and my partner who's from Wales says they use it there too!!
9 mins
  -> Thanks Enzalo

neutral  Neil Phillipson: I know that you are giving an alternative to Miros's question, but are you actually answering it with this phrase? Furthermore, I'm a native speaker of English, and to be honest, I've never heard of going on a drinking 'spree'. A spending spree yes.
15 mins
  -> Fair enough. Maybe people don't actually say it like that but the dictionary defines it as bender=drunken spree. The asker was only asking for confirmation of the meaning.

neutral  Jonathan MacKerron: agree with Neil
50 mins
  -> fair enough

neutral  Gareth McMillan: A spree tends to connote that the bout (of drinking) may have started out with a celebration. A bender, however is an out and out "Sauferei"- a long term piss-up for it's own sake. IMO UKE.
1 hr
  -> spree: a session of considerable overindulgence, esp. in drinking, squandering money, etc.

agree  Alexander Demyanov
4 hrs
  -> Thanks Alexander
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
They'd say "go out on a bender"


Explanation:
Same-o same-o

zaphod
Local time: 21:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: No, I don't think that 'out' is necessary, or even desirable; it almost turns it into an expression like 'to go out on a high' = to leave something at a moment of success
22 hrs
  -> Well, may go on a bender, but it's practically the same. Cheers,
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Nottinghamshire no problem - to go on a binge


Explanation:
To my mind there's no reason why not. Although I'm fairly sure that this phrase is not particular to Nottinghamshire.

'To be a bender' rather than drinking heavily means to go on a drinking 'binge', perhaps there is a good excuse for it, a birthday or special occasion, but then again many people do not need an excuse to go on a bender, as our media are happy to point out to us these days.

I hope it helps,
Neil.

p.s. I'm not from Nottinghamshire, but from Manchester (also in the norther part of England). Perhaps if someone is from there, they could confirm this phrase as being used there.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2004-12-09 16:46:52 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

to be on a bender, of course

Neil Phillipson
Local time: 20:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks to all very much!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jonathan MacKerron: much more apt to be used in Nottinghamshire than in New Hampshire!
49 mins
  -> thanks Jonathan

agree  Gareth McMillan: All over UK IMVHO, except Scotland (less). Benders don't need an excuse- they just are.
1 hr
  -> thanks Gareth

agree  Tony M: Yes, but be careful! The expression is 'ON a bender'; to BE a bender is something QUITE different !
23 hrs
  -> many a slip... Thanks, I didn't see that
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