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food and beverage services vs. catering services

English translation: catering – Ho.Re.Ca = Hotel, Restaurant, Catering – foodservice(s) – food (and beverage) service(s)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:food and beverage services vs. catering services
English translation:catering – Ho.Re.Ca = Hotel, Restaurant, Catering – foodservice(s) – food (and beverage) service(s)
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
Options:
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20:25 Oct 15, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Marketing / food and beverages
English term or phrase: food and beverage services vs. catering services
I know there have been many KudoZ questions about this before, such as:

http://www.proz.com/?sp=gloss/term&id=361553

http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=29458&keyword=catering

http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=182176&keyword=catering

http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=241869&keyword=catering

http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=278605&keyword=catering

http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=180424&keyword=catering

But, I would still like to list several terms I know of that might encompass the ENTIRE industry (or sector) that includes ALL providers ANY or ALL of the services listed below at ANY or ALL of the places listed below. Google English search results for the .com and .uk domains are provided for my terms.

I hope you tell me your feelings about which terms are most readily understood in different parts of the English speaking world, (I am especially interested in the best term or terms for the geographic area between Iceland and the Urals and between the North Cape and Malta), whether you feel a completely different term would be better, which terms do not encompass the ENTIRE industry (and if not why), and which terms sound most professional.

WHAT SERVICES ARE PROVIDED:

the preparation (including cooking and baking as well as just the heating up of cold or frozen dishes) AND / OR serving of such food dishes for immediate consumption

AND / OR

the preparation AND / OR serving of beverages (including: beer, cocktails, soft drinks, juices, coffee, tea, milk drinks, etc.) for immediate consumption

WHERE ARE THE SERVICES PROVIDED:

in hotels, bars, pubs, conventional restaurants, fast-food restaurants, night clubs, and snack bars
on board trains, planes, and ships
at special events outside conventional food service establishments (such as: weddings, parties, business meetings, sports events, conventions, etc.)

SOME POSSIBLE NAMES I HAVE FOUND FOR THE INDUSTRY / SECTOR:

Google English .uk domains

Catering Industry : 4760 hits

Hospitality and Catering Industry : 416 hits

Hotel and Catering Industry : 893 hits

Food and Beverage Industry : 366 hits
(probably includes food and beverage producers)

Food and Beverage Service Industry : 3 hits

Food Service Industry : 526 hits

Food and Catering Industry : 81 hits

----------------------------------------------------

Google English .uk domains

Catering Sector : 1270 hits

Hospitality and Catering Sector : 29 hits

Hotel and Catering Sector : 199 hits

Food and Beverage Sector : 32 hits
(probably includes food and beverage producers)

Food and Beverage Service Sector : one hit

Food Service Sector : 261 hits

Food and Catering Sector : 6 hits

----------------------------------------------------

Google English .com domains

Catering Industry : 6000 hits

Hospitality and Catering Industry : 166 hits

Hotel and Catering Industry : 1080 hits

Food and Beverage Industry : 10500 hits
(probably includes food and beverage producers)

Food and Beverage Service Industry : 80 hits

Food Service Industry : 32100 hits

Food and Catering Industry : 85 hits

----------------------------------------------------

Google English .com domains

Catering Sector : 788 hits

Hospitality and Catering Sector : 2 hits

Hotel and Catering Sector : 150 hits

Food and Beverage Sector : 487 hits
(probably includes food and beverage producers)

Food and Beverage Service Sector : one hit

Food Service Sector : 688 hits

Food and Catering Sector : 6 hits

----------------------------------------------------

I do not want the term to include food and beverage producing companies like Nestle, Kraft Foods (Philip Morris Companies Inc.), Guinness, Coca-Cola or Heineken, etc.

From all the above, it appears that something with "catering" might be best for European use even though the dictionary (NODE – The New Oxford Dictionary of English and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary) definitions of "catering" and U.S. usage indicate that "food service" might be best.

My feeling is that "catering" really means taking food somewhere else to serve it. Is this feeling old-fashioned thinking or U.S. English thinking or simply nonsense?

Last point: What do I do with whichever term you pick if the customer decides he wants to make "fast food" a separate category?

Don't want much do I?

TIA

Dan
Dan McCrosky
Local time: 20:11
Just to add to the confusion...
Explanation:
I thought you might find it interesting to know that here in Italy (and commonly in the rest of Europe), the catch-all term is "Ho.Re.Ca.", which stands for the English (!) terms Hotel-Restaurant-Catering. Just to show you how truly fuzzy the distinction is.

I would probably refer to this as "foodservices" in general, meaning food that is prepared and served or purchased, as opposed to buying the ingredients and making it yourself.

As an American, I agree with your spin on "catering". I certainly recall hearing people say, "They had the party catered". This meant that a company was hired, with or without wait staff, to bring prepared food. In some cases, you can even bring your own serving bowls and platters on which the company will arrange the food, so your guests will think you made it yourself -- a trend that was supposedly started by none other than Martha Stewart.
Selected response from:

Catherine Bolton
Local time: 20:11
Grading comment
Thank you all, especially The Tautologist, cbolton, and ACB & KMP.

From all your good answers, the suggestion from cbolton was the most interesting and valuable because the abbreviation "Ho.Re.Ca." and the one-word "foodservice(s)" term were both new for me. I will use variations on both terms in my copy. Here are some search results for the terms:

----------------- "Ho.Re.Ca."

http://www.google.de/search?as_q=&num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&btnG=Google-Suche&as_epq=Ho.Re.Ca.&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=lang_en&as_ft=i&as_filetype=&as_qdr=all&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=

130 Google English hits (not domain specific) covering most of the countries where my customer operates.

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=+%22Ho.Re.Ca.%22+site%3A.uk&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

Two Google English .uk domain hits

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=+%22Ho.Re.Ca.%22+site%3A.com&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

23 Google English .com domain hits

----------------- "foodservices"

http://www.google.de/search?as_q=foodservices&num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&btnG=Google-Suche&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=lang_en&as_ft=i&as_filetype=&as_qdr=all&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=

34,700 Google English hits not domain specific

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservices+site%3A.uk&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

530 Google English .uk domain hits

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservices+site%3A.com&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

4030 Google English .com domain hits

----------------- "foodservice"

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservice&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

155,000 Google English hits not domain specific

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservice+site%3A.uk&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

4430 Google English .uk domain hits

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservice+site%3A.com&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

160,000 Google English .com domain hits

(The above is NOT a typo. Google returned 5000 more hits at .com domains than for the whole Net???)

My conclusions are: Today, the one-word term "foodservice(s)" comes up only about 50% to 70% as often as the two-word term "food service(s)", but it could be that it will be the term for the future except for UK usage where "catering" will probably continue to be the winner.

The Internet copy I am rewriting for a new customer (food products distributor) currently uses the terms "fast foods sector", "catering sector", and "food industry" to attempt to describe all-inclusively the customer categories they serve. As their copy was not written by native speakers, I wanted to check with you before going along with their choice of categories.

Special thanks go to Bryan Crumpler for setting me straight:

Thank you for your comment that I shouldn't be trying to get something for nothing. Bryan, should you wish to send me an invoice for your comment, please do. If the amount of the invoice does not exceed the value of the comment, I will be happy to pay the full amount in cash the next time I am ever where you are.

I have been asking and (mostly) answering KudoZ questions for over two years now. This is the first time though that anyone has suggested that my question should not have been asked. I did not ask for an analysis, I asked for your feelings as native English speakers from around the world. The name of the asker is always included in the KudoZ query announcement email, Bryan. Please don't bother to read any future questions from me if you really feel I'm just trying to con you or that my questions are out of place.

Sincere thanks to everyone else!

Dan

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3catering industry
Karina Pelech
5 +1Food Services and Cateringmannix
5Just to add to the confusion...
Catherine Bolton
5food preparation and service industryRefugio
4 +1food for thought
Libero_Lang_Lab
4Food and Beverage Industry; Hospitality Industry
NancyLynn
3 +1catering industry OR sector
Tony M
1 +1You don`t, do you?Mike Ck
1You don`t, do you?Mike Ck


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
You don`t, do you?


Explanation:
How much are you paying...?

Mike Ck
Spain
Local time: 20:11
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
You don`t, do you?


Explanation:
How much are you paying...?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-15 20:41:02 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, didn`t mean to put that in twice. Just a joke...

Mike Ck
Spain
Local time: 20:11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Refugio: Once might be considered cheeky, twice might be considered pesky. Why not just answer or not answer?
24 mins

agree  Bryan Crumpler: Yeah... this is a lot for a "spare time" sort of thing... Industry term analyses need to be on a paid-only basis. And regarding refugio... apparently he didn't realize that stalled webpages & doubleclicking submit ends up in double posts
4 hrs

neutral  airmailrpl: click on 'hide' to remove the first post
10 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
food for thought


Explanation:
I don't guarantee that my response will 'cater for' all geographic or linguistic tastes, but the term used in British English for the services you describe is most certainly catering.


I quote you:

"the preparation (including cooking and baking as well as just the heating up of cold or frozen dishes) AND / OR serving of such food dishes for immediate consumption

AND / OR

the preparation AND / OR serving of beverages (including: beer, cocktails, soft drinks, juices, coffee, tea, milk drinks, etc.) for immediate consumption

WHERE ARE THE SERVICES PROVIDED:

in hotels, bars, pubs, conventional restaurants, fast-food restaurants, night clubs, and snack bars
on board trains, planes, and ships
at special events outside conventional food service establishments (such as: weddings, parties, business meetings, sports events, conventions, etc.)"

This is as good and all-embracing a definition of the UK understanding of 'catering' as I could ever come up with.

If you said that someone worked in the catering industry, it could cover everything from hotel chefs and restaurant waitresses, providers of 'catering services' for events, to fast-food outlet employees (although in the latter case it sounds somewhat pretentious, it is very much used - in the same way that telesales staff are called 'consultants').

Then there is the fact that catering colleges in the UK primarily train cooks and chefs.

The various other combinations you list:
food and catering industry
hospitality and catering industry
hotel and catering industry
all sound valid and idiomatic to the UK ear. While there are large areas of overlap between them, they each have a different emphasis to my mind. Food and catering would relate, I think, more to restaurants, cafes, take-aways, ready-meals services; hospitality and catering would apply to companies that provide services, including food, for events; hotel and catering - well, that kind of speaks for itself.

Not sure that this has been ANY help at all. But there you have it.






Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:11
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 137

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl: catering
10 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
catering industry


Explanation:
would serve you well.

Oerhaps it is a little of the US thinking, and a little of the old fashioned stereotype we have all given the term what with awful school food (oh dear - I don't want to remember..) - but fast food would be a perfectly acceptable sub-category within the above term.

If you don't want the term to include food and beverage producing companies like Nestle, Kraft Foods (Philip Morris Companies Inc.), Guinness, Coca-Cola or Heineken, etc. , then I would leave food services or food and beverage services alone.

But that's just my own humble opinion...
see what the rest of the experts say.

Good luck ... :o)


Karina Pelech
Argentina
Local time: 15:11
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 31

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
23 mins
  -> Thank you Dusty - and for your invaluable comments below - I agree to an extent, but maybe it's the US ear taking you over again saludos desde BA ... :o)

agree  Jacqueline McKay
32 mins
  -> Many thanks Jaqueline .. greetings from Buenos Aires ... :o)

agree  airmailrpl: catering industry
10 hrs
  -> Thanks again airmail ... :o)
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35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
food preparation and service industry


Explanation:
I am not sure why you want to lump all these different functions into a single category. I believe catering would not apply to restaurant, hotel or fast food service. And I think it is not necessary to specify beverages separately, as they are assumed to be included in food preparation and service. By specifying preparation and service, you make it clear that manufacturers are excluded. For fast food, just tack 'fast' on the front: fast food preparation and service.

Refugio
Local time: 11:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 485
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40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
catering industry OR sector


Explanation:
I'm just using my answer to endorse ACB & KMP's suggestion, because I wanted to add a longer comment.

I think 'food and beverage' is very often used as a sort of euphemism or high-falutin' term for the serving-end of the trade, and I feel that 'catering industry OR sector OR profession OR trade' is a more all-embracing term, including as it very clearly does the othewr things you mention like food and foodstuffs preparation, bakery, etc.

Just my humble opinion, for what it's worth!

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3234

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Karina Pelech: I agree, (and thanks) ... :o)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, folks!
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47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Food and Beverage Industry; Hospitality Industry


Explanation:
To my Canadian ear, either of these includes those who provide refreshment, ready-to-consume, to the public.
But in my mind travelling salesmen, who sell hotdogs and canned pop out of carts at fairs or sell hambrugers or coffee out of drive-thru windows or at counters, providing seating area or not, and licensed to sell alcohol, or not, don`t really provide hospitality, do they? There`s no hospitable environment to enjoy said goodies...
To me, a caterer brings the food to your location, either ready-to-serve or in need of assembly at the destination.
Thus I end up back at my original choice: food and beverage industry.
HTH

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 14:11
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 473

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  mannix: these terms are too broad - F and B definitely includes manufacturers (in Canada), hospitality can include hosts, coatcheck services, organizers/event planners... not limited to catering aspects
2 hrs
  -> oh yes, hospitality is just too broad, but I still like F&B, yours too

neutral  Tony M: In the UK, 'catering' certainly does NOT imply 'out-caterers' (as perhaps it does in the US), but anything to do with food, particualrly the eating rather than growing end!
9 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Food Services and Catering


Explanation:
This is commonly used combination, and has the catchall quality you appear to be looking for...

mannix
Local time: 20:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn
43 mins
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Just to add to the confusion...


Explanation:
I thought you might find it interesting to know that here in Italy (and commonly in the rest of Europe), the catch-all term is "Ho.Re.Ca.", which stands for the English (!) terms Hotel-Restaurant-Catering. Just to show you how truly fuzzy the distinction is.

I would probably refer to this as "foodservices" in general, meaning food that is prepared and served or purchased, as opposed to buying the ingredients and making it yourself.

As an American, I agree with your spin on "catering". I certainly recall hearing people say, "They had the party catered". This meant that a company was hired, with or without wait staff, to bring prepared food. In some cases, you can even bring your own serving bowls and platters on which the company will arrange the food, so your guests will think you made it yourself -- a trend that was supposedly started by none other than Martha Stewart.

Catherine Bolton
Local time: 20:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 98
Grading comment
Thank you all, especially The Tautologist, cbolton, and ACB & KMP.

From all your good answers, the suggestion from cbolton was the most interesting and valuable because the abbreviation "Ho.Re.Ca." and the one-word "foodservice(s)" term were both new for me. I will use variations on both terms in my copy. Here are some search results for the terms:

----------------- "Ho.Re.Ca."

http://www.google.de/search?as_q=&num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&btnG=Google-Suche&as_epq=Ho.Re.Ca.&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=lang_en&as_ft=i&as_filetype=&as_qdr=all&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=

130 Google English hits (not domain specific) covering most of the countries where my customer operates.

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=+%22Ho.Re.Ca.%22+site%3A.uk&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

Two Google English .uk domain hits

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=+%22Ho.Re.Ca.%22+site%3A.com&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

23 Google English .com domain hits

----------------- "foodservices"

http://www.google.de/search?as_q=foodservices&num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&btnG=Google-Suche&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=lang_en&as_ft=i&as_filetype=&as_qdr=all&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=

34,700 Google English hits not domain specific

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservices+site%3A.uk&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

530 Google English .uk domain hits

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservices+site%3A.com&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

4030 Google English .com domain hits

----------------- "foodservice"

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservice&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

155,000 Google English hits not domain specific

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservice+site%3A.uk&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

4430 Google English .uk domain hits

http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_qdr=all&q=foodservice+site%3A.com&btnG=Google-Suche&meta=lr%3Dlang_en

160,000 Google English .com domain hits

(The above is NOT a typo. Google returned 5000 more hits at .com domains than for the whole Net???)

My conclusions are: Today, the one-word term "foodservice(s)" comes up only about 50% to 70% as often as the two-word term "food service(s)", but it could be that it will be the term for the future except for UK usage where "catering" will probably continue to be the winner.

The Internet copy I am rewriting for a new customer (food products distributor) currently uses the terms "fast foods sector", "catering sector", and "food industry" to attempt to describe all-inclusively the customer categories they serve. As their copy was not written by native speakers, I wanted to check with you before going along with their choice of categories.

Special thanks go to Bryan Crumpler for setting me straight:

Thank you for your comment that I shouldn't be trying to get something for nothing. Bryan, should you wish to send me an invoice for your comment, please do. If the amount of the invoice does not exceed the value of the comment, I will be happy to pay the full amount in cash the next time I am ever where you are.

I have been asking and (mostly) answering KudoZ questions for over two years now. This is the first time though that anyone has suggested that my question should not have been asked. I did not ask for an analysis, I asked for your feelings as native English speakers from around the world. The name of the asker is always included in the KudoZ query announcement email, Bryan. Please don't bother to read any future questions from me if you really feel I'm just trying to con you or that my questions are out of place.

Sincere thanks to everyone else!

Dan
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