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centre stub

English translation: See explanation below...

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02:47 Feb 21, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Mechanics / Mech Engineering
English term or phrase: centre stub
drills for drilling tools

sorry for the many questions!

"Problem:
Cutting edge frittering
Possible remedies:
Check bottom of hole or disk for possible centre stub

[I thinks the disc is what they call end disc in this sentence: "The combined features of geometry and position of the inserts produce a smaller end disc than from conventional drills upon break through of the hole."]

(in other documents of the same manufacturer stub seems to be a short shank)

... also, I did not understand the meaning of the whole sentence
Elena Ghetti
Italy
Local time: 08:09
English translation:See explanation below...
Explanation:
Once again, I don't know anything about these particular types of drills, but I can hazard a guess at what they might be referring to, as it crops up also in turning.

If the cutting edge(s) does/do not pass perfectly right through the centre of the circular space being machined (e.g. the bottom of the hole), a small 'peak' of uncut material can be left sticking up in the centre [this happens when turning on a lathe because the cutting tool is not correctly aligned. This 'stub' might be a little 'pip' of material, or possibly a slightly conical 'hump', if the cutting edges have an incorrect negative angle. Obviously, this obstruction in the bottom of the hole will interfere with the way the cutting takes place. This is a problem that you don't get with a 'conventionl' drill bit.

By the way, you see now from all this talk about inserts etc. how these types of drills may be regarded more as rotating cutting tools than mere drill bits, and hence another reason why they often talk about 'boring' rather than simply 'drilling'

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Note added at 4 hrs 56 mins (2005-02-21 07:43:59 GMT)
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I\'m not sure which particular bit of the sentence is causing you difficulties. The last part simply means: \"if you experience frittering (damage) of the cutting edge, check and see that there is no \'pip\' of uncut material at the botom of your hole (if it\'s a blind one that doesn\'t go through) or on the disc of material that falls away (if it is a through hole) --- again, this idea of a \'disc\' reinforces the idea that this hole is being made with a tool that cuts round the edges first, rather than a conventional conical-pointed drill bit. Their mention of \'smaller end disc\' suggests that these inserts make quite a wide cut (since the disc is unwanted waste, there is no need for it to be kept as large as possible)
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:09
Grading comment
many many thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2See explanation below...
Tony M


  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
See explanation below...


Explanation:
Once again, I don't know anything about these particular types of drills, but I can hazard a guess at what they might be referring to, as it crops up also in turning.

If the cutting edge(s) does/do not pass perfectly right through the centre of the circular space being machined (e.g. the bottom of the hole), a small 'peak' of uncut material can be left sticking up in the centre [this happens when turning on a lathe because the cutting tool is not correctly aligned. This 'stub' might be a little 'pip' of material, or possibly a slightly conical 'hump', if the cutting edges have an incorrect negative angle. Obviously, this obstruction in the bottom of the hole will interfere with the way the cutting takes place. This is a problem that you don't get with a 'conventionl' drill bit.

By the way, you see now from all this talk about inserts etc. how these types of drills may be regarded more as rotating cutting tools than mere drill bits, and hence another reason why they often talk about 'boring' rather than simply 'drilling'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 56 mins (2005-02-21 07:43:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I\'m not sure which particular bit of the sentence is causing you difficulties. The last part simply means: \"if you experience frittering (damage) of the cutting edge, check and see that there is no \'pip\' of uncut material at the botom of your hole (if it\'s a blind one that doesn\'t go through) or on the disc of material that falls away (if it is a through hole) --- again, this idea of a \'disc\' reinforces the idea that this hole is being made with a tool that cuts round the edges first, rather than a conventional conical-pointed drill bit. Their mention of \'smaller end disc\' suggests that these inserts make quite a wide cut (since the disc is unwanted waste, there is no need for it to be kept as large as possible)

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:09
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 496
Grading comment
many many thanks!
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