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bleeding anywhere

English translation: generalized bleeding

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07:31 Jan 20, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical: Pharmaceuticals / SPC
English term or phrase: bleeding anywhere
That does not sound too scientific ... but ubiquitous bleeding / haemorrhage would be (absolutely/disastrously) wrong I guess. Any suggestions, how MDs say it when among themselves.

TiA, Vito
Vito Smolej
Germany
Local time: 20:08
English translation:generalized bleeding
Explanation:
From: http://books.google.com/books?id=onQSpU1P9gkC&pg=PA444&lpg=P...
"Bleeding may be localized or generalized. Localized bleeding may take the form of prolonged bleeding from venupuncture sites, excessive bleeding at the site of operation both during operation and post-operatively, and uterine bleeding at the site of placental detachment. The GENERALIZED BLEEDING manifestations include eccymoses, hematomas, gastrointestinal bleeding, and hematuria. Petechiae are often present because of the associated thrombocytopenia. Serious bleeding due to defibrination occurs most commonly as a complication of obstetrical accidents or surgery, in which it is sometimes catastrophic..."

The asker does not specify as to the nature of the bleeding, whether it is slow or very active, for instance. He says only that it may be "anywhere". I am puzzled by the term "anywhere" as opposed to the term "everywhere", but I am assuming that he is referring to bleeding that can occur at multiple random sites. Bleeding such as this usually is the result of hematological conditions affecting the blood's ability to coagulate. The bleeding may not be profuse, but it is diffuse (in its distribution). "Generalized bleeding" is a non-specific term to denote this condition, without reference to the underlying cause.



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Note added at 14 hrs (2008-01-20 21:46:32 GMT)
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OK Vito, thanks for the additional information.

The drug under discussion, fluorouracil, can cause thrombocytopenia (reduction of platelets, the blood cell involved in coagulation). Although the source text advices to stop the drug if the platelets (BTW your translation "thrombocytes" is virtually never used in English) drops below 80,000, no real harm will take place until the count drops below 20,000. (They have thrown in a safety factor.) Under 20,000, spontaneous bleeding can occur anywhere in the body.

At this point, based on your translation of the source text, it would appear that the pamphlet is advising patients to stop the drug if they have ANY bleeding. The term "anywhere" is redundant. This would be a safety measure, expecting the physician to then check the platelet count. Of course, if the patient has accidentally cut himself with a knife, and the platelet count is OK, the physician would tell him to restart the flourouracil.

Then again, it is possible that the source text actually means "generalized bleeding", that is, bleeding from multiple sources, or even "spontaneous bleeding anywhere", even if it is from a single source. Here, the key word is "spontaneous" since it would imply a situation brought about by the drug, that would not normally be expected to occur in a healthy individual.

I will leave it to you to determine what is the intention of the source text and then pick from my suggestions.

Regards,

Michael
Selected response from:

Michael Barnett
Local time: 14:08
Grading comment
Thanks for a professional and well-supported answer
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3generalized bleeding
Michael Barnett
4bleeding in any part of the bodyElizabeth Rudin
3profuse bleeding/profuse haemorrhaging
Joyce A


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
profuse bleeding/profuse haemorrhaging


Explanation:
In terms of a large amounts of bleeding, I've often heard "profuse bleeding" (of wounds, etc.)


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Note added at 16 mins (2008-01-20 07:48:29 GMT)
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Profuse bleeding or severe bleeding. The following are examples and there are many references on the net:

Wounds
A laceration too may have little or profuse bleeding; the tissue damage is generally greater and the wound's ragged edges do not readily line up. ...
www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/common/standard/transfor... - 58k - Cached - Similar pages




Successful treatment of severe bleeding in hemophilic target ...
After total knee or elbow replacement, profuse intraarticular bleeding unresponsive .... In these patients the bleeding stopped and no profuse bleeding was ...
www.bloodjournal.org/cgi/content/full/105/7/2654 - Similar pages




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 58 mins (2008-01-20 08:29:58 GMT)
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Hello Vito:

I found this site for you. It mentions "intraoperative bleeding being 'ubiquitous.'" I hope that helps.

http://www.journals.elsvierhealth.com/periodicals/ymsy/artic...


Abstract
Background. Intraoperative bleeding is ubiquitous during open surgical procedures and uniformly effective hemostasis remains elusive. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of a novel collagen-based composite (CoStasis Surgical Hemostat) compared with standard methods of hemostasis during general, hepatic, cardiac, and orthopedic operations

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Note added at 7 hrs (2008-01-20 14:52:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry Vito. I just noticed the above website doesn't open up. For your information, here is the site that uses the term "bleeding is ubiquitous." (But doctors do use the word "profuse bleeding" for cases where a lot of blood is being lost.") :-)

Surgery
Intraoperative bleeding is ubiquitous during open surgical procedures and uniformly effective hemostasis remains elusive. We conducted a randomized ...
www.journals.elsevierhealth.com/periodicals/ymsy/article/PI... - 28k - Cached - Similar pages



Joyce A
Thailand
Local time: 01:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Michael Barnett: Hi Janet. My interpretation of "ubiquitous" in this instance is that bleeding is common, not all over the body. In any case "bleeding was/is ubiquitous" gets only 2 ghits.
21 hrs
  -> So you interpret it as being a common phenomenon during open surgical procedures? Sounds good. By the way, two ghits are better than none. :-) And, another moral (for me, of course): "Don't hatch ideas for answers till the meaning is accounted for. :-)
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
generalized bleeding


Explanation:
From: http://books.google.com/books?id=onQSpU1P9gkC&pg=PA444&lpg=P...
"Bleeding may be localized or generalized. Localized bleeding may take the form of prolonged bleeding from venupuncture sites, excessive bleeding at the site of operation both during operation and post-operatively, and uterine bleeding at the site of placental detachment. The GENERALIZED BLEEDING manifestations include eccymoses, hematomas, gastrointestinal bleeding, and hematuria. Petechiae are often present because of the associated thrombocytopenia. Serious bleeding due to defibrination occurs most commonly as a complication of obstetrical accidents or surgery, in which it is sometimes catastrophic..."

The asker does not specify as to the nature of the bleeding, whether it is slow or very active, for instance. He says only that it may be "anywhere". I am puzzled by the term "anywhere" as opposed to the term "everywhere", but I am assuming that he is referring to bleeding that can occur at multiple random sites. Bleeding such as this usually is the result of hematological conditions affecting the blood's ability to coagulate. The bleeding may not be profuse, but it is diffuse (in its distribution). "Generalized bleeding" is a non-specific term to denote this condition, without reference to the underlying cause.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 hrs (2008-01-20 21:46:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK Vito, thanks for the additional information.

The drug under discussion, fluorouracil, can cause thrombocytopenia (reduction of platelets, the blood cell involved in coagulation). Although the source text advices to stop the drug if the platelets (BTW your translation "thrombocytes" is virtually never used in English) drops below 80,000, no real harm will take place until the count drops below 20,000. (They have thrown in a safety factor.) Under 20,000, spontaneous bleeding can occur anywhere in the body.

At this point, based on your translation of the source text, it would appear that the pamphlet is advising patients to stop the drug if they have ANY bleeding. The term "anywhere" is redundant. This would be a safety measure, expecting the physician to then check the platelet count. Of course, if the patient has accidentally cut himself with a knife, and the platelet count is OK, the physician would tell him to restart the flourouracil.

Then again, it is possible that the source text actually means "generalized bleeding", that is, bleeding from multiple sources, or even "spontaneous bleeding anywhere", even if it is from a single source. Here, the key word is "spontaneous" since it would imply a situation brought about by the drug, that would not normally be expected to occur in a healthy individual.

I will leave it to you to determine what is the intention of the source text and then pick from my suggestions.

Regards,

Michael

Michael Barnett
Local time: 14:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 31
Grading comment
Thanks for a professional and well-supported answer

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Piotr Sawiec: I agree with your reasoning, I do not think that you should wait for generalized bleeding to stop the drug, "spontaneous bleeding anywhere" would be my best guess, or "any unusual/unexpected bleeding" (if you cut yourself with a knife it is expected :-))
14 hrs
  -> Thanks Piotr. I agree with your interpretation. :-)

agree  Alexander Vorobyev: Not "generalized", I suppose, but "bleeding from any site" or "unusual bruising or bleeding" (as it is in lots of leaflets for fluorouracil).
2 days1 hr
  -> Thanks Alex. The "generalized" suggestion was made before the additional information was available.

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
9 days
  -> Thanks Marju!
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
bleeding in any part of the body


Explanation:

Just a suggestion. More context would have helped.


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Note added at 1 day1 hr (2008-01-21 08:39:39 GMT)
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I didn’t provide references to support my answer yesterday because I didn’t think it was necessary – this is a widely use phrase (3740 Google hits), and the Asker only needed a better alternative for “bleeding anywhere”.

I still think that “bleeding in any part of the body” fits the context provided last night and reflects the source text (which is very important here), without overcomplicating the issue.

The SPC warns doctors that treatment with the cytostatic agent should be discontinued immediately upon the occurrence of intestinal ulceration and haemorrhage (preceding line in the translation provided by the Asker), or upon the occurrence of bleeding in any [other] part of the body. This makes sense to me.


Elizabeth Rudin
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian, Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in category: 8
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