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injury / trauma

English translation: take a look at the following...

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14:17 May 26, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Medical / sports medicine
English term or phrase: injury / trauma
I am translating a few pages of medical text from Hungarian into English (for the first and hopefully, the last time in my life) and I would need help with the use of injury or trauma in sports medicine. I know doctors normally talk about trauma, but is it OK to say "sports trauma" or rather "sports injuries". There will be a proofreader, of course, but I don't want to give him too much work.
Thanks in advance,
Eva
Eva Blanar
Hungary
Local time: 00:51
English translation:take a look at the following...
Explanation:
Hi Eva,
First, some info:

Etymology: Greek traumat-, trauma wound, alteration of trOma; akin to Greek titrOskein to wound, tetrainein to pierce -- more at THROW
Date: circa 1693
Inflected Form(s): plural traumas also trau.ma.ta /-m&-t&/
1 a : an injury (as a wound) to living tissue caused by an extrinsic agent b : a disordered psychic or behavioral state resulting from mental or emotional stress or physical injury
2 : an agent, force, or mechanism that causes trauma
- trau.mat.ic /tr&-'ma-tik, tro-, trau-/ adjective
- trau.mat.i.cal.ly /-ti-k(&-)lE/ adverb

-----------

Etymology: Middle English injurie, from Latin injuria, from injurus injurious, from in- + jur-, jus right -- more at JUST
Date: 14th century
Inflected Form(s): plural -ries
1 a : an act that damages or hurts : WRONG b : violation of another's rights for which the law allows an action to recover damages
2 : hurt, damage, or loss sustained

Now, the answer...

The problem is that the word "injuries" has been misused over the years to include 'wounds' rather than the pure idea of "damage" - which I suppose is a natural 'progression of the language'.

Nowadays, when we receive patients in the ER / A&E and they have been caused by some voluntary physical action, they are first classified as "injuries". If the damage, or wound has been caused due to 'excessive force' or unusual force, or if the person has sustained and injury which is in any way surprising or shocking to either the patient or surgeon, it is classified as trauma. Indeed, if any injury that appears as though it will cause pain / inflammation / incapacitation for a period of more than a few days - it is termed "traumatic".

Nowadays, almost all sports injuries are categorised as traumatic due to the fact they were received during physical action - but this is not correct. Take for example an injury to a tennis player's wrist or elbow - it may have taken many months to get to the stage where they seek treatment. By this time - it may be classified "traumatic" - but in fact is not at all.

If I were you, I would stick to "sports injuries" to cover all bases...

HTH ... good luck ... :o)
Selected response from:

Karina Pelech
Argentina
Local time: 19:51
Grading comment
Very impressive, indeed! Thanks a lot to all of you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +10take a look at the following...
Karina Pelech
4 +7sports injuries
Elisabeth Ghysels
5 +2Different meaningsJohn Kinory
5sports injuries / athletic injuriesxxxElena Sgarbo


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
sports injuries


Explanation:
is perfect for all kinds of text (108,000 times in Google).
Greetings,

Nikolaus

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-26 14:25:20 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"sports trauma\" of course does also exist, but it\'s more typically used as part of a longer term, like \"Sports
Trauma Research Center\" or \"Sports Trauma Management\"

Elisabeth Ghysels
Local time: 00:51
PRO pts in pair: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBBW,linguist
1 min

agree  pschmitt
4 mins

agree  RHELLER: trauma implies a more serious injury. would not be used for "tennis elbow"
4 mins

neutral  John Kinory: 100000 Google hits is NOT a reliable reference. Rita: trauma does not imply severity or lack of it in comparison with injury.
11 mins
  -> You would have difficulty to defend this (100000), in a philosophical discussion about what language is and how it works

agree  jerrie
42 mins

agree  Kim Metzger: I agree that sports injuries would be a good choice as a general term.
47 mins

agree  Karina Pelech: as someone said a couple of days ago, Google hits don't justify your answer (or anyone else's) - it has to be used in context, but "injuries" is fine ... see below for explanation ... :o)
50 mins
  -> thanks; anyway another short comment on language philosophy: 15 Google hits, of which half authored by none native speakers, doesn't mean much; 100,000 Google hits is called living language, whether one approves of it or not. Greetings, Nikolaus

agree  Anna Aljabiry: My experience from being hospitalized so many times (several times each) is that the word "trauma" is used when "emotions" are involved, especially when the injury affects the family members not only the person who is injured.
8 days
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Different meanings


Explanation:
Trauma derives from the Greek 'wound', therefore it implies an impact of some sort, and that's how it's used in medicine.

Injury, OTOH, is any physical damage. It includes trauma as a subset, but can mean (e.g.) internal damage such a twisted organ, which would not, normally, be classed as trauma.

The terms are not always used precisely, but that's the technical meaning. So it depends on what you intend to say.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-26 16:20:45 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Obviously the conclusion is that in a general discussion, sports injuries is a better term.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-28 07:57:32 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Elena writes:

... for each of these 3 expressions. The 3 are used as SYNONYMOUS (regardless of Mr. Kinory\'s comments):

MEDLINE frequency for 3 expressions over the past 7 years:

- trauma injuries: 7
- sports injuries: 206
- athletic injuries: 2814 ...

This clearly means that Elena thinks that any trauma injury is a sports injury (which of course is completely incorrect). She refers me back to the question, but perhaps she needs to reread her own answer!

----------------------------------------------

Elisabeth thinks that \'100,000 Google hits is called living language\'. Not when those hits are from non-native speakers, it\'s not. I don\'t teach the French how to speak French (or the german, Swiss, etc etc); they can\'t teach me how to speak English.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-28 11:02:34 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Elena writes:

... for each of these 3 expressions. The 3 are used as SYNONYMOUS (regardless of Mr. Kinory\'s comments):

MEDLINE frequency for 3 expressions over the past 7 years:

- trauma injuries: 7
- sports injuries: 206
- athletic injuries: 2814 ...

This clearly means that Elena thinks that any trauma injury is a sports injury (which of course is completely incorrect). She refers me back to the question, but perhaps she needs to reread her own answer!

----------------------------------------------

Elisabeth thinks that \'100,000 Google hits is called living language\'. Not when those hits are from non-native speakers, it\'s not. I don\'t teach the French how to speak French (or the german, Swiss, etc etc); they can\'t teach me how to speak English.




    Collins, Carta medical dico
    Experience in medical translations
John Kinory
Local time: 23:51
PRO pts in pair: 48

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Elisabeth Ghysels: for all practical purposes, all injuries in sports are also a trauma; a muscle tear due to forceful contraction is also a trauma (in the language of the people who actually use the word)
13 mins
  -> {shrug} not in the documents I translate. As to Google: there is nothing philosophical about it. Web pages can be (and regularly are) posted by non-experts, to say nothing of non-native speakers.

neutral  Kim Metzger: Appears trauma surgeons use the term the way ordinary people do, i.e., it IMPLIES a more serious injury.
1 hr
  -> Not in the documents I translate. A very minor blow to the thumb is regularly referred to as a trauma.

agree  Katsuhiko KAKUNO, Ph.D.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Sue Goldian
1 day7 hrs
  -> Thanks.
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
take a look at the following...


Explanation:
Hi Eva,
First, some info:

Etymology: Greek traumat-, trauma wound, alteration of trOma; akin to Greek titrOskein to wound, tetrainein to pierce -- more at THROW
Date: circa 1693
Inflected Form(s): plural traumas also trau.ma.ta /-m&-t&/
1 a : an injury (as a wound) to living tissue caused by an extrinsic agent b : a disordered psychic or behavioral state resulting from mental or emotional stress or physical injury
2 : an agent, force, or mechanism that causes trauma
- trau.mat.ic /tr&-'ma-tik, tro-, trau-/ adjective
- trau.mat.i.cal.ly /-ti-k(&-)lE/ adverb

-----------

Etymology: Middle English injurie, from Latin injuria, from injurus injurious, from in- + jur-, jus right -- more at JUST
Date: 14th century
Inflected Form(s): plural -ries
1 a : an act that damages or hurts : WRONG b : violation of another's rights for which the law allows an action to recover damages
2 : hurt, damage, or loss sustained

Now, the answer...

The problem is that the word "injuries" has been misused over the years to include 'wounds' rather than the pure idea of "damage" - which I suppose is a natural 'progression of the language'.

Nowadays, when we receive patients in the ER / A&E and they have been caused by some voluntary physical action, they are first classified as "injuries". If the damage, or wound has been caused due to 'excessive force' or unusual force, or if the person has sustained and injury which is in any way surprising or shocking to either the patient or surgeon, it is classified as trauma. Indeed, if any injury that appears as though it will cause pain / inflammation / incapacitation for a period of more than a few days - it is termed "traumatic".

Nowadays, almost all sports injuries are categorised as traumatic due to the fact they were received during physical action - but this is not correct. Take for example an injury to a tennis player's wrist or elbow - it may have taken many months to get to the stage where they seek treatment. By this time - it may be classified "traumatic" - but in fact is not at all.

If I were you, I would stick to "sports injuries" to cover all bases...

HTH ... good luck ... :o)



    10 years trauma surgeon
Karina Pelech
Argentina
Local time: 19:51
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 31
Grading comment
Very impressive, indeed! Thanks a lot to all of you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: WOW! It's a pleasure to hear from someone who really knows his/her stuff.
7 mins
  -> Just trying to help Ritta - thank you for your support ... saludos de Buenos Aires .... :o)

agree  Kim Metzger: Saludos desde Guadalajara! Nice to know how you folks actually use the terms.
23 mins
  -> igualmente ... gracias Kim - it's an honour to have your support ... :o)

agree  John Kinory: Exactly as I said: tennis elbow, which IS serious, notwithstanding Rita's counterfactual assertion, is not a trauma. A rasily-healed impact injury IS trauma.
1 hr
  -> gracias John - you are correct ... :o)

agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
1 hr
  -> Thank you Margaret ... :o)

agree  Dr Janine Manuel BSc BHB MBChB
2 hrs
  -> Thank you for your support Janine ... :o)

agree  AhmedAMS
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Ahmed ... :o)

agree  Piotr Kurek
5 hrs
  -> gracias Piotr ... :o)

agree  Tatiana Neroni
12 hrs
  -> gracias Tatiana ... :o)

agree  Petra Winter
15 hrs
  -> thanks Petra ... :o)

agree  Sue Goldian
1 day6 hrs
  -> Thank you Sue ... :o)
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
sports injuries / athletic injuries


Explanation:
Eva,
SInce your field is Medical (not journalism), I thought you'd like to know what the usage frequency is in Medicine and English Medical scientific publications for each of these 3 expressions. The 3 are used as synonymous (regardless of Mr. Kinory's comments):

MEDLINE frequency for 3 expressions over the past 7 years:

- trauma injuries: 7
- sports injuries: 206
- athletic injuries: 2814

The expression "athletic injuries" is offered by Medline when you run a search by "sports injuries".

Good luck

Elena


    I'm an MD in the US
xxxElena Sgarbo
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 294

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Kinory: So any trauma injury is a sports injury? I don't think so.
27 mins
  -> ????? You may need to read again Eva's request. Eva refers specifically to sports medicine.
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