KudoZ home » English » Medical (general)

"so long as" versus "as long as"

English translation: as long as

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
06:20 Jan 16, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / clinical assessment
English term or phrase: "so long as" versus "as long as"
I would like to invite native speakers from the UK to answer this question. Thank you.

Context (from a line of instruction for clinicians): "Check all that apply, so long as these are separate events; must ask about all types"

I'm supposed to adapt this (US) version of the sentence into Hong Kong version. However, I'm not sure whether "so long as" is appropriate (or acceptable) as used this way in British English (which I'll use as a guide for the local version).

Cheers
Naikei Wong
Local time: 18:59
English translation:as long as
Explanation:
My native speaker instinct is to prefer "as long as", although I wouldn't consider "so long as" actually wrong. You could also consider "provided that" as an alternative.

I would also prefer to replace "these" by "they" - as long as they are separate events. Maybe "these" is OK in the US, but I don't think UK English would use it (since there is no reason for the emphasis provided by "these" - it is just a simple statement of fact).
Selected response from:

Armorel Young
Local time: 11:59
Grading comment
Thank you Armorel. The info was very relevant!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +7as long as
Armorel Young
3 +2Pls. see below
Andrew Vdovin


  

Answers


32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Pls. see below


Explanation:
To me, "so long as" is more like "since", while "as long as" is more like "while".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 34 mins (2008-01-16 06:54:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So I guess "so long as" is OK.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2008-01-16 06:57:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Check this out - might be useful:

So, "so long as" always indicates a condition, whereas "as long as" can also mean "for the same amount of time as" without the implication of a condition.
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=16318


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 39 mins (2008-01-16 06:59:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And this one:

When they are used in the comparison of physical lengths, use only <as long as> for affirmative sentences and <so long as> or <as long as> for negative sentences.
This bridge is as long as the Golden Gate Bridge.
That bridge is not so/as long as the Golden Gate Bridge.

When <as (so) long as> is used as an adverbial conjunctive similar to <provided that ...>, you can use either, though <so long as> sounds somewhat more archaic than <as long as>.
As/so long as you stay in US, you can improve your English speaking skill.
I can read any book as/so long as it is written in English.

http://www.englishforums.com/English/SoLongAsVsAsLongAs/bwxj...

Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 17:59
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you Andrew for the the very detailed explanations, which I found helpful too. For this question, however, I rather need a UK person to confirm whether they use "so long as" in England! Sorry that I could only award the points to one helper... cheers!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  katsy: good explanations! Yes, here 'so long as' = condition, and 'as long as' is OK in this sense too. I wd say either (native UK English speaker), though maybe indeed 'so long as' is more formal, and has the advantage of being unambiguous in this context!)
1 hr

agree  xxxTatiana N.: "so long as" - a standard legal term introducing a condition, I'd not try "adapting" it since it concerns a standard of care and liability. The main purpose of a legal document is to define rights and liabilities correctly, style is secondary.
20 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
as long as


Explanation:
My native speaker instinct is to prefer "as long as", although I wouldn't consider "so long as" actually wrong. You could also consider "provided that" as an alternative.

I would also prefer to replace "these" by "they" - as long as they are separate events. Maybe "these" is OK in the US, but I don't think UK English would use it (since there is no reason for the emphasis provided by "these" - it is just a simple statement of fact).

Armorel Young
Local time: 11:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Thank you Armorel. The info was very relevant!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxcmwilliams: I'd opt for 'provided that' and I agree with your comments about 'these'.
38 mins

agree  Ken Cox: 'provided that' is definitely better (zero ambiguity), and I agree with 'they' instead of 'these' (which I see increasingly often in UK texts used like German 'diese' as a 'bare' demonstrative pronoun in a subordinate clause, which I find unnatural)
2 hrs

agree  Marie-Hélène Hayles: and with cmwilliams and Ken
2 hrs

agree  V_N
2 hrs

agree  Sheila Wilson: agree on all points
7 hrs

agree  Cristina Santos
12 hrs

agree  Rachel Fell: agree with Sheila Wilson;-)
1 day7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search