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infantry, cavalry in a modern context

English translation: ground forces, ground units, ground troops

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10:05 Mar 26, 2003
English to English translations [PRO]
Military / Defense / military
English term or phrase: infantry, cavalry in a modern context
Politics aside, I am surprised to see on TV the modern usage of certain militray terms such as "infantry" or "cavalry", when obviously no-one is actually waging war on foot or an horses. In fact, a born civilian (like me) would simply refer to both of these units as "tanks"
Can someone explain the semantic evolution of these terms and what is now the actual difference between "infantry" and "cavalry"?
Csaba Ban
Hungary
Local time: 09:09
English translation:ground forces, ground units, ground troops
Explanation:
I thought we just used the word 'ground' to distinguish between all the other ways and means.
'foot soldiers' springs to mind
'tank unit/division'...

sorry no research, just happened to read your question, and this is what came to mind.

I'm sure someone will give you the full low down on infantry/cavalry.

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Note added at 2003-03-26 10:36:44 (GMT)
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Glossary of terms:
http://www.glosters.org.uk/glossary.html



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Note added at 2003-03-26 10:42:01 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Glossary of terms:
http://www.glosters.org.uk/glossary.html

The president arrived at Fort Hood, about 90 minutes from his Crawford, Texas, ranch, with an array of heavy-duty, sand-colored military hardware readied for his inspection. Along with troops in formation, Bush was given a demonstration of an Abrams tank, a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, a mobile command center, an Apache helicopter and a Paladin howitzer.

The installation is home to the 1st Cavalry Division, a highly mobile unit that relies on helicopters and tanks.



Selected response from:

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:09
Grading comment
Thanks for both of you. I just imagined what words I would use if I had to translate these terms into my native language (Hungarian): "infantry" is literally "walking (unit)", whereas "cavalry" is "horse-mounted (unit)"
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1As to fighting on foot, there is nothing obsolete about that.Fuad Yahya
3 +1ground forces, ground units, ground troops
jerrie


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
As to fighting on foot, there is nothing obsolete about that.


Explanation:
I think that that sense of "infantry" will never go out of date.

Cavalry is defined as "a highly mobile army unit using vehicular transport, such as light armor and helicopters."



    American Heritage Dictionary
Fuad Yahya
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 7

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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
ground forces, ground units, ground troops


Explanation:
I thought we just used the word 'ground' to distinguish between all the other ways and means.
'foot soldiers' springs to mind
'tank unit/division'...

sorry no research, just happened to read your question, and this is what came to mind.

I'm sure someone will give you the full low down on infantry/cavalry.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-03-26 10:36:44 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Glossary of terms:
http://www.glosters.org.uk/glossary.html



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-03-26 10:42:01 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Glossary of terms:
http://www.glosters.org.uk/glossary.html

The president arrived at Fort Hood, about 90 minutes from his Crawford, Texas, ranch, with an array of heavy-duty, sand-colored military hardware readied for his inspection. Along with troops in formation, Bush was given a demonstration of an Abrams tank, a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, a mobile command center, an Apache helicopter and a Paladin howitzer.

The installation is home to the 1st Cavalry Division, a highly mobile unit that relies on helicopters and tanks.





jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks for both of you. I just imagined what words I would use if I had to translate these terms into my native language (Hungarian): "infantry" is literally "walking (unit)", whereas "cavalry" is "horse-mounted (unit)"

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxEDLING
3 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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