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hip

English translation: listened to only by a small group of people

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05:04 Sep 23, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Music
English term or phrase: hip
A few years ago it was hip to listen to lengthy

instrumental pieces from Iceland; now, it's nearly commonplace.
Shirley Fan
Local time: 08:03
English translation:listened to only by a small group of people
Explanation:
The word "hip" as used in this context is exclusionary. Note the contrast with "now, it's nearly commonplace." Before only a small group of music fans listened to such music, but it has since become more mainstream.
Selected response from:

Andrew Levine
United States
Local time: 20:03
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3in vogue
David Hollywood
5 +2listened to only by a small group of people
Andrew Levine
4cool,groovy, neat, far out
Michael Powers (PhD)
4(here) limited to 'in the know' crowd/groupAlexander Demyanov
3clique-type behaviourMelzie


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
in vogue


Explanation:
or cool

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Note added at 4 mins (2007-09-23 05:09:03 GMT)
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all the rage

David Hollywood
Local time: 21:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER
10 mins

agree  Michael Powers (PhD)
15 mins

agree  Sheila Wilson: fashionable, to use an un-hip word (or should that be hipless?)
1 hr

disagree  Andrew Levine: Sorry, but this interpretation clashes with the "now, it's commonplace" in the next sentence. It must be emphasized that the music had a smaller audience when it was "hip" and a larger one now.
1 hr

agree  Caroline Moreno: Actually that's why the writer used "was". You could also render it as "in style."
19 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cool,groovy, neat, far out


Explanation:
Old slang meaning it was something people in the "in crowd" did, people who are popular and leaders among the followers.

Mike :)

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Note added at 5 mins (2007-09-23 05:10:10 GMT)
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Look at the second meaning in this source for the definition used for "hip" as an adjective:

2 (hp) also hep (hp)
adj. hip·per also hep·per, hip·pest also hep·pest Slang
1. Keenly aware of or knowledgeable about the latest trends or developments.
2. Very fashionable or stylish.

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Note added at 8 mins (2007-09-23 05:13:15 GMT)
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Here is an interesting article that also addresses how things considered "hip" or "cool" have change with time:


Posted on: Tuesday, April 29, 2003

ABOUT WOMEN
Definition of hip changes with age, and we're cool with that

• Previous About Men/Women
• Join our About Men/Women discussion

By Catherine E. Toth
Advertiser Staff Writer

She walked in the cafeteria with perfectly spritzed bangs, her crimped hair cascading over her bare shoulders. In stone-washed jeans with ankle zippers and with an armful of Swatches, she was the fashion envy of every teenage girl, who desperately wanted her wardrobe of denim jackets and stirrup pants.

She was, in 1989, the epitome of cool.

Of course, there's nothing cool about side ponytails and slouch socks now.

But back then, our raging hormones told us that neon crop tops and plastic bracelets transformed us into cool. In rolled-up denim shorts and Converse high-tops, we could proudly strut around campus, confident we had constructed the accepted look that made us less dorky that we actually felt.

But it wasn't just the look you wanted; it was the attitude.

There was always that one kid who tried so hard to fit in, who bought all the right combinations but couldn't pull it together. She paired high heels with sweatpants; he wore his Jobbers hat sideways.

The definition of cool extended way beyond fashion sense to incorporate an entire package that included vocabulary and body movements.

The cool kids in high school were more often the prom queens than the valedictorians. They cut school, owned cars, drank Bacardi without chasers. They hung out in phone booths, skateboarded, never used backpacks. They weren't the honor students, the weirdos or the band geeks. Most of the time they were hardly around. That's what made them so cool.

I have always been in cool limbo. I never really belonged to any one group in high school, shuttling between tables in the cafeteria during lunch. I played Trumps with the woodwinds, went to movies with the granolas, cruised with the skaters.

I didn't belong to any group and no one group owned me. Instead, I wandered aimlessly through high school, not fitting in but never standing out.

The notion of cool didn't go away when the principal handed you that now-lost diploma. But what we consider cool now, after dead-end jobs and monthly car payments, has changed.

Cool is owning your own three-bedroom home off Diamond Head at age 30.

Cool is buying a new truck only to transport your 22-foot Boston Whaler.

Cool is running a marathon in less than five hours, crossing the Ka'iwi Channel on a paddleboard, surfing an epic eight-foot Backdoor unscathed.

We are impressed with college names and job titles. We are obsessed with knowing how much money people make. We count success in the number of toys we own.

But what transcends all the makings of cool, what matters more than salaries and financial portfolios, is still attitude.

You could be the highest-paid engineer under 40. You could've started a multimillion-dollar catering business. You could be the world's greatest longboarder. But if you're obnoxious, arrogant or lack any semblance of compassion or courtesy, you are cool wasted.

Because cool, at least to me, is more about appreciating what you've got and being happy about it. It's about knowing who you are and staying true to that. It's about not letting anyone else dictate what's cool.

You can be cool without the boat, without the house, without the 401(k).

But the Members Only jackets and Dove shorts will have to go.

Reach Catherine E. Toth at 535-8103 or ctoth@honoluluadvertiser.com

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Note added at 9 mins (2007-09-23 05:14:15 GMT)
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link for preceding article:


Definition of hip changes with age, and we're cool with that - The ...
Hawaiian dictionary · E-mail news alerts ... ABOUT WOMEN Definition of hip changes with age, and we're cool with that ...
the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2003/Apr/29/il/il10a.html - 62k - Cached - Similar pages - Note this

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 20:03
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
listened to only by a small group of people


Explanation:
The word "hip" as used in this context is exclusionary. Note the contrast with "now, it's nearly commonplace." Before only a small group of music fans listened to such music, but it has since become more mainstream.

Andrew Levine
United States
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Shera Lyn Parpia: Yes, I think this is the idea
1 hr

agree  NancyLynn: exclusionary, right! it's what set them apart in the past, but now everyone is doing it (which means the elite must find a new trend...)
11 hrs

neutral  Alexander Demyanov: You are talking about "niche", which is different from "hip"
16 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
clique-type behaviour


Explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clique

to clarify further

Melzie
Local time: 02:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
(here) limited to 'in the know' crowd/group


Explanation:
Was considered fashionable among some "exclusive" groups (of "early adopters").

Alexander Demyanov
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 20
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