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please help with the meaning

English translation: See explanation below...

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09:24 Nov 11, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Music / drums
English term or phrase: please help with the meaning
The hardware with this set-up is doubly impressive and it hails from Yamaha’s motorcycle factory ensuring that build quality is solid. As much as we have been consistently sold the idea that 'double bracing' makes for a more solid stand, and it does to some extent, Yamaha's single-braced stands are just as sturdy an a lot less heavy to cart around.
***Even flying a 22" ride cymbal off one of the CS745s, it never dared to suggest that it could not handle the size or weight of that cymbal.*** I'd always opt for single-braced hardware if it were of this high level.

Dear native English speakers!
I can't really catch the meaning of the asterisked sentence - would someone please clarify it for me?
The talk is about drum kit hardware.
CS745 is a ride cymbal stand, but I can't really understand what it has to do with the rest of the sentence...
I'd appreciate any suggestions.
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 16:02
English translation:See explanation below...
Explanation:
"Even flying a 22" ride cymbal off one of the CS745s, it never dared to suggest that it could not handle the size or weight of that cymbal."

"Even when I tried using the stand to support this big heavy cymbal, there was never at any moment reason for me to feel that it (= the stand) was not sturdy enough to support the size / weight of this cymbal"

Does that clarify it enough for you, Andrew?

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Note added at 18 mins (2007-11-11 09:43:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'flying off' is an expression used for things like cymbals (because by their nature they are not rigidly fixed) — it's just musicians' jargon!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 41 mins (2007-11-11 10:06:08 GMT)
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You're welcome, Andrew! I'm one of the worst offenders when it comes to convoluted phrasing, so it's only right I should help to unravel things when I can! ;-)))
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:02
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your help Tony! Thanks everybody!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6See explanation below...
Tony M
3 -1"It" is Yamahasalavat


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
"It" is Yamaha


Explanation:
Imho the meaning of the sentence is that Yamaha (the it) never dared to suggest... and so on. So its single-braced stands are good enough.

salavat
Local time: 14:02
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: No, that wouldn't really make sense in the context as given.
4 mins
  -> You are wonderful Tony! My congratulations

neutral  Jim Tucker: I think you are taking this too literally; the speaker is personifying the cymbal stand. Drummers do that. // It is now! ; sorry 'bout that.
59 mins
  -> I agree with you and Tony. Is it not clear?
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
[see sentence]
See explanation below...


Explanation:
"Even flying a 22" ride cymbal off one of the CS745s, it never dared to suggest that it could not handle the size or weight of that cymbal."

"Even when I tried using the stand to support this big heavy cymbal, there was never at any moment reason for me to feel that it (= the stand) was not sturdy enough to support the size / weight of this cymbal"

Does that clarify it enough for you, Andrew?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2007-11-11 09:43:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'flying off' is an expression used for things like cymbals (because by their nature they are not rigidly fixed) — it's just musicians' jargon!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 41 mins (2007-11-11 10:06:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You're welcome, Andrew! I'm one of the worst offenders when it comes to convoluted phrasing, so it's only right I should help to unravel things when I can! ;-)))

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your help Tony! Thanks everybody!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jim Tucker: This is absolutely right.
44 mins
  -> Thanks, Jim!

agree  Robin Levey
1 hr
  -> Thanks, M/M!

agree  npis: Yap, it (the stand) never showed any sign that it was not sturdy enough to support the 22" ride cymbal.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, npis! Yes, indeed.

agree  Dylan Edwards
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Dylan!

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro: Yes indeed!
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Paula!

agree  Suzan Hamer: And with npis.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Suzan!
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