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Spud Man and his Baked Potato-Mobile

English translation: from Batman and the Batmobile

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15:50 Sep 7, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Other
English term or phrase: Spud Man and his Baked Potato-Mobile
Were you to wrap your car in crumpled tin foil, the radio waves would scatter in many different directions, making an accurate determination of velocity with a radar gun very difficult (which explains the difficulty the authorities have in bringing **Spud Man and his Baked Potato-Mobile** to justice).

I was wondering if this is a reference to something in American popular culture (the text was written by an American), eg a movie, advertising etc. I've searched the web with basically no results so far. Thanks a lot in advance.
Lorenzo Lilli
Local time: 12:25
English translation:from Batman and the Batmobile
Explanation:
There have been several parodies of the US comic-book superhero Batman, whose amazing vehicle is called the Batmobile. I'm sure that is the basis for this reference to some non-existent hero who could baffle speed cameras with a car wrapped in foil.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2006-09-07 19:28:05 GMT)
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It wouldn't baffle speed cameras, but it would baffle laser gun speed traps.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:25
Grading comment
Thanks a lot to both of you! It seems sooo obvious now :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +16from Batman and the Batmobile
Jack Doughty
4 +1See explanation below...
Tony M


  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
spud man and his baked potato-mobile
See explanation below...


Explanation:
No, no, it's much simpler than that!

If someone WERE to wrap their car in tinfoil, thus making it undetectable, then it would look like a baked jacket potato — which of course would be a Spudmobile, driven by Spudman.

In other words, the proof that the technique works is that (the non-existent, of course!) Spudman has never yet been caught!

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:25
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 148

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Benham: I think both you and JD are right, in that the joke makes sense without the Batman reference, but it is hard to ignore the similarity once you notice it!
31 mins
  -> Thanks, RB! Oh yes, indeed, JD's cultural reference is priceless...

neutral  Jack Doughty: No-one would ever have referred to a Something-mobile (popemobile, bananamobile etc.) if it hadn't been for the originator of these expressions, the Batmobile.
35 mins
  -> Thanks, Jack! I wasn't in any way trying to suggest your explanation wasn't applicable, I just felt it might help Asker to explain the other part of the question more fully, is all!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +16
spud man and his baked potato-mobile
from Batman and the Batmobile


Explanation:
There have been several parodies of the US comic-book superhero Batman, whose amazing vehicle is called the Batmobile. I'm sure that is the basis for this reference to some non-existent hero who could baffle speed cameras with a car wrapped in foil.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2006-09-07 19:28:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It wouldn't baffle speed cameras, but it would baffle laser gun speed traps.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 268
Grading comment
Thanks a lot to both of you! It seems sooo obvious now :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anton Baer: 'spud' being 'potato' in (US?) slang...
12 mins
  -> Thank you. In UK slang certainly, possibly also US. I think it was originally Irish.

agree  zaphod: And when you bake a potato you wrap it in tin foil
15 mins
  -> Thank you. Yes, exactly.

agree  R-i-c-h-a-r-d
16 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver
17 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Can Altinbay: We use spud here in the US. Devo, from Idaho, was referred to as doing "spud rock", Idaho being well known for its potatoes.
21 mins
  -> Thank you. I wasn't sure if it was known in the USA, but I've since found this US firm which makes "spud guns" for firing potatoes. http://www.spudtech.com/

agree  jccantrell: This is NOT a well-known parody in any sense in the USA. But the comments about spuds and tin foil are correct. You can also get a spud gun: http://science.howstuffworks.com/spud-gun.htm
30 mins
  -> Thank you. No, I don't think it's any known parody, I think the author of this English text made it up himself. Have you heard of the British children's TV cartoon series "Bananaman"? http://johnnorrisbrown.com/classic-nick/bananaman/index.htm

agree  Suzan Hamer
40 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Dave Calderhead
1 hr
  -> Thank you.

agree  Alison Jenner
1 hr
  -> Thank you.

agree  humbird: I just wonder if this is an allusion to the controversial incident of anti-government movement. See here ------ http://www.crimelibrary.com/gangsters_outlaws/cops_others/ra... Why Spud (equivalent of Idaho in the US)? Am I going too far?
2 hrs
  -> Thank you. I'm not familiar with the incident, so I don't know if you're going too far or not.

agree  Aisha Maniar
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Richard Benham: I remember having a spud gun as a kid. One type (the type my brother had) was banned when it was found that it could be used to fire .22 calibre cartridges (alghough I daresay accuracy would have been a problem).//Inter alia!
3 hrs
  -> Thank you. I think the spud guns in the reference I give above fire whole potatoes.

agree  Cristina Chaplin
7 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  webguru
13 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Tony M: Spud guns usually only fire a tiny pellet of spud, which you gat from a whole spud, so it ends up left with loads of tiny holes in. Firing a whole spud would be about as dangerous as rubber bulllet! (Have you evere been hit by a flying King Edward?)
14 hrs
  -> Thank you. Yes, I'd only heard of the spud-pellet type of gun before I found that reference.

agree  KathyT
17 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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