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flunk (into Br. Eng.)

English translation: fail/flunk

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:flunk (into Br. Eng.)
English translation:fail/flunk
Entered by: Terry Burgess
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

22:37 Mar 9, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: flunk (into Br. Eng.)
Br. Eng. native speakers, please.
I need a Br. Eng. equivalent that is as colloquial as "flunk", which means to fail an academic course It is also used absolutely and transitively, so that one can say:
I flunked (in) geometry.
or
She flunked me in geometry.
Any construction is fine as long as the register is maintained.
xxxJon Zuber
1:- Fail-----2:-)Flunk
Explanation:
I agree (partially) with msebold.

However, I do not agree with using "fail" as a transitive verb, e.g "She (the teacher) failed me in Geometry". In this case "fail would be understood as "dissapoint/let down/didn't do her job. In this case, I can see no option, other than "flunk".

Besides, what's the big deal? Flunk appears in Roget's---and can be used in both senses.

Lastly, I might suggest (for these 2 particular cases) using what I've suggested above.

Good Luck Jon!
terry
Selected response from:

Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 01:02
Grading comment
Thanks, Terry. My take on it is that "flunk", which I decided to use, is used in Br. Eng. but is not at all common.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +11:- Fail-----2:-)Flunk
Terry Burgess
4I blew it/bungled it/cocked up (in) geometry
pschmitt
4I messed up in (subject)Klaus Dorn
4failMichael Sebold


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
fail


Explanation:
Is what Oxford and my British friends say it is.

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Note added at 2002-03-09 22:59:46 (GMT)
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Perhaps \"flubbed.\"

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Note added at 2002-03-09 23:06:32 (GMT)
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Or: \"bungled\"

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Note added at 2002-03-09 23:33:00 (GMT)
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I\'ve now heard from another British friend who says that they actually used \"flunked\" when he was at university.

Michael Sebold
Canada
Local time: 02:02
PRO pts in pair: 10

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Klaus Dorn: I thought he wanted colloquial - he seems to know "fail" already (see above)
4 mins
  -> Hi Klaus - indeed, "coloquial" is what I asked for in consulting my British friends, and "fail" is what I got back.
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
I messed up in (subject)


Explanation:
"I messed up" is very much a colloquial British English expression for "flunk"

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Note added at 2002-03-09 22:47:29 (GMT)
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of course, it doesn\'t work if you use it from the teacher\'s end...\"she messed me...\" - no way.

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Note added at 2002-03-09 22:49:44 (GMT)
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another suggestion - \"flop\"...my (subject) exam was a flop...

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Note added at 2002-03-09 22:51:58 (GMT)
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another, far more \"colloquial\" term would be \"I f***ed up\"...you know what I mean

Klaus Dorn
Local time: 09:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 35
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
1:- Fail-----2:-)Flunk


Explanation:
I agree (partially) with msebold.

However, I do not agree with using "fail" as a transitive verb, e.g "She (the teacher) failed me in Geometry". In this case "fail would be understood as "dissapoint/let down/didn't do her job. In this case, I can see no option, other than "flunk".

Besides, what's the big deal? Flunk appears in Roget's---and can be used in both senses.

Lastly, I might suggest (for these 2 particular cases) using what I've suggested above.

Good Luck Jon!
terry


    Above
Terry Burgess
Mexico
Local time: 01:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 119
Grading comment
Thanks, Terry. My take on it is that "flunk", which I decided to use, is used in Br. Eng. but is not at all common.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Sebold: Great explanation of "fail." In order to get the coloquial feel without using "flunk," I would still use "fail" as long as the accompanying text makes clear exactly who did the failing. (Someone could still make all of this moot with better expression!)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Michael....and I agree with you. Forgive me but I haven't quite got the hang of this yet. Bear with me:-)))
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
I blew it/bungled it/cocked up (in) geometry


Explanation:
If you want to use something more colloquial, I'd go for: "I bollocked up geometry" or "I fucked up/screwed up geometry. To be honest, I think that's what an ordinary British student would say among his peers.

Hope this helps

pschmitt
Local time: 07:02
PRO pts in pair: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Terry Burgess: Whereas I fully agree that 99% of British students would put it this way (and kids from Yorkshire or Newcastle could probably improve on it...even I could), I strongly suspect that such language transgresses ProZ rules and regulations of etiquette.
1 hr
  -> Sorry, but I didn't put this down gratuitously. Like it or not - people do talk this way - and not only students (and not only in Yorkshire or Newcastle!)

neutral  Berni Armstrong: Rules of etiquette apply to aadolescent attempts to say naughty word on a public forum...Heee Hee Hee... In this case I think pschmitt is justified in suggesting swear words which the subject would probably use. Let's not take squeamishness too far!
5 hrs
  -> Thanks!
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