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yellow press

English translation: newspapers and periodicals of the early 20th century that published news stories of a vulgarly sensational nature

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:yellow press
English translation:newspapers and periodicals of the early 20th century that published news stories of a vulgarly sensational nature
Entered by: wrtransco
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11:06 Mar 12, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: yellow press
type of journalism, article
Mariusz Nejman
Definition
Explanation:
yellow press
A popular name for newspapers and periodicals of the early 20th century that published news stories of a vulgarly sensational nature. Synonymous with gutter press. See also: tabloid.
Selected response from:

wrtransco
Local time: 12:09
Grading comment
Thank you for definition of yellow press.
I neaded it for better understandinr reading book.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3Publishers of shocking and sensational stories etc.
Olga Simon
4 +2Definitionwrtransco
5journalism that distorts to sensationalizekeiva
5gossip-filled, scandalous and sensationalistic taboids/reports
Rafa Lombardino
5Tabloids; The Tabloid Press; Penny-Dreadfuls; the Gutter Press; Lowbrow
Peter Skipp


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Publishers of shocking and sensational stories etc.


Explanation:
To remain competitive tabloids often entice readers with shocking and sensational stories, lurid details of scandals and crimes, pin-ups etc., which explains why they are sometimes called the gutter press or ‘yellow press'.

www.kochlich.de/american_press.htm




    Reference: http://www.kochlich.de/american_press.htm
Olga Simon
Hungary
Local time: 18:09
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MJ Barber: yes, basically the sensationalistic press
7 mins

agree  Alison Schwitzgebel
10 mins

agree  Tatiana Neroni: I think, all journalism is about sensational stories... Sensation is the "bread" of journalism... The difference with yellow press is the vulgar character of those sensations portrayed.
5 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Definition


Explanation:
yellow press
A popular name for newspapers and periodicals of the early 20th century that published news stories of a vulgarly sensational nature. Synonymous with gutter press. See also: tabloid.


    Reference: http://vax.wcsu.edu/library/odlis.html#anglo
wrtransco
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
Grading comment
Thank you for definition of yellow press.
I neaded it for better understandinr reading book.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fernando Muela
1 min

agree  Tatiana Neroni: That's it! Vulgar sensationalism...
5 hrs
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
gossip-filled, scandalous and sensationalistic taboids/reports


Explanation:
These are the qualities of the yellow journalism... Believe me, I'm a journalist, but not a yellow one!!! ;o)

Good luck.


    Reference: http://alt.tnt.tv/movies/tntoriginals/roughriders/jour.home....
    Reference: http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAyellow.htm
Rafa Lombardino
United States
Local time: 09:09
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4
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49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Tabloids; The Tabloid Press; Penny-Dreadfuls; the Gutter Press; Lowbrow


Explanation:
The term is Tabloid, the Tabloid Press.

The phrase 'the Yellow Press' doesn't exist in Britain and other English-speaking countries -- not in common usage! Some more knowledgeable people will know it (only very vaguely) as refering to Canards and 'scandal-sheets' on the Continent, which were often printed on yellow stock (like financial papers, which tend to use pink stock).

Incidentally, in the USA they have no 'national' newspapers: magazines rule. Their National Enguirer has all the tabloids' features in magazine form. Thus, another term they use is the Gutter Press.

In local US communities (which do have newspapers), Canada, other English-speaking countries and -- of course -- the home of tabloid king Rupert Murdoch, Australia, the term is tabloid.

The term Tabloid comes from the size of stock (paper) used for cheaper and more sensationalist newspapers in Britain. This is smaller than the Brosadheet size used for serious ("Highbrow") analytical newspapers in Britain. The size is still commercially available in Britain, decades after A-sizes came in. (Other pre-A-size papers include Foolscap and Quatro, similar [as I recall...] to A4.)

Instead of reporting and analysing serious news, the tabloid press focuses on celebrities and their private lives and infidelities, sports life (especially linked with betting), show biz (show business, or low-grade quasi-theatrical entertainment close to old-time Music Halls). A feature of it this school of journalism is its double standard: on the one hand, the reporter claims he is shocked by what he reports, on the other, he clearly enjoys reporting it and wants more! Thus tabloid journalists will be 'shocked and offended' by the loose sexual behaviour of some female star, but they will still print lots and lots of 'saucy' papparazzi photos showing her nude or semi-nude in private moments...

THE major marker of tabloid journalism, however, is the salacious, descriptive, lurid and lavish reporting of crime.

Indeed, it is the crime aspect that links today's tabloids with the Penny Dreadfuls of the Victorian era. These were usually printed as soon as a murder took place, or a court verdict (usually hanging) was announced on a murderer. Scores of peper vendors took them around town, screaming, say, " 'Orrible murder in Old Street!!! Read all about it!!! Only a Penny a go!!!" Since their intended eaders were the urban poor, the price was kept down to a Penny a piece. (A Penny was not all that trivial a sumq especially for poor folk, in Victorian times: Pennies still split up into 12 Farthings; but it was reasonably affordable for a gory read!)

How do I know? I am a journalist, for my sins...

Peter Skipp
Bulgaria
Local time: 19:09
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 96
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
journalism that distorts to sensationalize


Explanation:
The American Heritage Dictionary gives some interesting history:

yellow journalism:
NOUN: Journalism that exploits, distorts, or exaggerates the news to create sensations and attract readers.
ETYMOLOGY: From the use of yellow ink in printing “Yellow Kid,” a cartoon strip in the New York World, a newspaper noted for sensationalism.

I believe this use of "yellow" was tied in with hysterical racist fear of persons from east asia ("yellow peril").


    Reference: http://www.bartleby.com/61/48/Y0014800.html
keiva
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