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Is the adj. "take-charge" used in Br. Eng.?

English translation: no,

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20:28 Apr 3, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Is the adj. "take-charge" used in Br. Eng.?
I'm considering "take-charge" as a translation for the bit in brackets (whose literal meaning is "very organising", but I'm not sure it's used in Br. Eng. I'm not asking for alternatives, only that my idea be supported or shot down as warranted.
"Enric d’Ossó i Cervelló, born in Vinebre (La Ribera d’Ebre), was canonised by John Paul II in 1993. He was a [molt organitzador] man, of strong character, and as an educational reformer and admirer of Saint Teresa of Ávila, founded the Order of Saint Teresa in 1876."
xxxJon Zuber
English translation:no,
Explanation:
definitely not

can't think of another one right now, but don't use that

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Note added at 2002-04-03 20:35:52 (GMT)
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maybe, he was a born organiser, he had a gift for organising
Selected response from:

MJ Barber
Spain
Local time: 06:20
Grading comment
Thanks to all answerers, points to MJ for getting there first.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Don't use the adjectiveWerner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
4 +2no,
MJ Barber
4Don't use for British English. "Take-charge" is North American.xxxFranH
4yes - in CanadaMichael Sebold
4noingot


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
yes - in Canada


Explanation:
. . . and I would think elswhere also.

Michael Sebold
Canada
Local time: 00:20
PRO pts in pair: 10

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO): Oh Canada ...
3 mins

disagree  John Kinory: Not elsewhere in tham 'ere islands.
2 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
no,


Explanation:
definitely not

can't think of another one right now, but don't use that

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 20:35:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

maybe, he was a born organiser, he had a gift for organising

MJ Barber
Spain
Local time: 06:20
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 75
Grading comment
Thanks to all answerers, points to MJ for getting there first.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheila Hardie: I like the suggestion ´a born organiser´:)
12 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
25 days
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Don't use the adjective


Explanation:
The adjective form exists, but I would not use it in this context; it is quite informal ("he's a take-charge kind of guy").

Say: .... who liked to take charge ...

or something along these lines.

Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 00:20
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Sebold: Yes - for more formal writing, although I have seen "take-charge man" in journalistic writing.
7 mins
  -> Yes, but I am only going by that little snippet of text.

agree  AhmedAMS
25 days
  -> Thanks
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
no


Explanation:
take-charge would be "domineering "in BA
and that would seem a little too negative for your purpose.

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Note added at 2002-04-03 20:57:36 (GMT)
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BE,of course!

ingot
PRO pts in pair: 4
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Don't use for British English. "Take-charge" is North American.


Explanation:
You might just say "he was a very capable organiser" or possibly that he was a very "hands-on" organiser. "Hands-on" means a leader or organiser who is active, not just a figure-head, someone who tends not to delegate and concerns themselves with every aspect of an enterprise. Mrs Thatcher was described as a very "hands-on" prime minister.

xxxFranH
PRO pts in pair: 4
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