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Leggo my San Diego

English translation: San Diego == sandy Eggo

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20:59 May 9, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Leggo my San Diego
also Leggo my Ego

what do the expressions mean?

has to do with 'let go' i guess??
bg.Linguist
Bulgaria
Local time: 02:20
English translation:San Diego == sandy Eggo
Explanation:
In commenting on Kim's answer, it occured to me that the answer is simply:

Let go of my sandy Eggo.

i.e. my sandy waffle

The fact that you can say it as:

Leggo my San Diego

is what makes it interesting...



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 22:26:53 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To clarify:

As Autobahn noted, this stems from the TV commercial line \"Leggo my Eggo.\" The original meaning of which is \"Let go of my Eggo.\" I am pretty sure this is just a simple play on words. By saying \"Leggo my San Diego\" you are also saying \"Leggo my sandy Eggo\" due to the closeness of the sounds. As far as I know there is no special meaning to this.

Google does give us one hit for the literal usage (i.e. \"Let go of my San Diego\" == \"Stop using San Diego (poorly)\") at http://www.bartcop.com/0003.htm
Selected response from:

Eden Brandeis
Local time: 16:20
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8San Diego == sandy Eggo
Eden Brandeis
3 +5leggo my ego = commercial (advertisement) for a waffle, in other words "let go of my waffle"
Autobahn
5 +1let go of my San Diegontext
4Let go.
Gayle Wallimann
4 -1let go of my sandy ego
Kim Metzger


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
let go of my San Diego


Explanation:
short for

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 21:29:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

What does it mean? No context is given, so one can only guess. It could mean that somebody occupies S.D. in some form or criticizes S.D. in some form, and that the speaker wants them to stop. But then it could mean something entirely different.

\"to let go of s.th.\" is to release s.th., to stop holding on to s.th., to stop gripping s.th.

ntext
United States
Local time: 18:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 379

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gayle Wallimann
1 day9 hrs
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
leggo my ego = commercial (advertisement) for a waffle, in other words "let go of my waffle"


Explanation:
I think in this connection it means "let go of my city of San Diego", but I would have to know more about the remaining text.

Greetings, from San Diego
Brigitte

Autobahn
Local time: 19:20
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 2

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jccantrell: The name is Eggo, but yep this is the play on words
11 mins

agree  xxxdeufrang
4 hrs

agree  Maria Knorr
15 hrs

agree  Maria Nicholas: This is it. For the Eggo product, the slogan denoted how much the waffle eaters became obsessed with their waffle, to the point where they wouldn't let anyone else have any. :) Very popular advertising tagline in its day.
15 hrs

agree  Tatiana Neroni
1 day1 hr
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
let go of my sandy ego


Explanation:
That's my guess. It's a play on words = San Diego = sandy ego. What's a sandy ego? Maybe it refers to someone who's ego has been damaged. It's sore.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 21:28:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A person whose ego is sandy could be interpreted to mean his/her feelings have been hurt.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 18:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Eden Brandeis: I don't think so. San Diego and sandy ego sound nothing alike. It wouldn't make a fun play on words. San Diego and Eggo (the waffle) do however share a common sound... Seems like a very "in" joke...any San Diegans care to comment?
19 mins
  -> They sound nothing alike? But I do agree there could well be a meaning well known to San Diegans.

disagree  Terence Riley: Disagree with Eden - poetically, they do sound enough alike. Exactly alike if one slightly modifies pronunciation of 'Diego'. Shakespeare took such liberties all the time, as have many poets.
14 hrs

neutral  Gayle Wallimann: This is not the question that Sylvia asked. Although I agree with you that the play on words would work well, pronunciation is close enough to be used in this way.
1 day9 hrs
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
San Diego == sandy Eggo


Explanation:
In commenting on Kim's answer, it occured to me that the answer is simply:

Let go of my sandy Eggo.

i.e. my sandy waffle

The fact that you can say it as:

Leggo my San Diego

is what makes it interesting...



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 22:26:53 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To clarify:

As Autobahn noted, this stems from the TV commercial line \"Leggo my Eggo.\" The original meaning of which is \"Let go of my Eggo.\" I am pretty sure this is just a simple play on words. By saying \"Leggo my San Diego\" you are also saying \"Leggo my sandy Eggo\" due to the closeness of the sounds. As far as I know there is no special meaning to this.

Google does give us one hit for the literal usage (i.e. \"Let go of my San Diego\" == \"Stop using San Diego (poorly)\") at http://www.bartcop.com/0003.htm

Eden Brandeis
Local time: 16:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxdeufrang: I really like your explanation.
4 hrs

agree  Rolf Klischewski, M.A.: Eden, you rule.
9 hrs

agree  Kaori Myatt
10 hrs

agree  Terence Riley: I don't know the commercial, but that sounds right. It may not be necessary to be literal here - see Dr. Seuss. It's apparently a poetic double play. Quadruple play, more like.
14 hrs

agree  Tatiana Neroni
1 day1 hr

neutral  Gayle Wallimann: Great explanation, but Sylvie didn't ask for sandy ego, that was Kim's addition that turned peopl's attention away from the real question.
1 day8 hrs
  -> This is the answer to the original question. San Diego sounds like Sandy Eggo i.e. a sandy waffle. It is a play on words that teenagers would enjoy. A sandy ego doesn't sound like San Diego and thus is not the answer...anyway just my two cents.

agree  Mike Sekine: Eden is the man
2 days17 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
3 days19 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
30 days
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1 day11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Let go.


Explanation:
Here is a quote from the website below:
"Leggo - "Let Go." [Cont] Made popular
in multiple vernaculars by the commercial slogan "Leggo my Eggo.""

This is just an addition to clarify that "leggo" implies that someone is holding on (literally or figuratively) to something that someone else owns or believes to have priority claims to. If you can picture a kind of tug-of-war, that is the image thatcomes to mind.


    Reference: http://www.panikon.com/phurba/alteng/l.html
Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 01:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 172
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