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should

English translation: No

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10:08 May 10, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: should
Hi.
Can should replace the hyphens in the following sentence?
I wish something --- have been so and so.
Are there any options to fill the space with, besides "could" and "would" ? thank you.
ident
English translation:No
Explanation:
You cannot have "I wish" plus "should".

You can say "It should" or "I wish (that) X had ...".

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Note added at 2002-05-10 10:26:22 (GMT)
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For your sentence, it should (!) therefore read \"I whish it had been so and so\".

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Note added at 2002-05-10 10:26:40 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For \"whish\" read \"wish\"!!
Selected response from:

Jan Liebelt
France
Local time: 02:33
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +12NoJan Liebelt
4would/couldRHELLER


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +12
No


Explanation:
You cannot have "I wish" plus "should".

You can say "It should" or "I wish (that) X had ...".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-10 10:26:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For your sentence, it should (!) therefore read \"I whish it had been so and so\".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-10 10:26:40 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For \"whish\" read \"wish\"!!

Jan Liebelt
France
Local time: 02:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ang
6 mins
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agree  5Q
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23 mins
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agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
1 hr
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agree  xxxivw
19 hrs
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agree  Olaf
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agree  Сергей Лузан
3 days1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
would/could


Explanation:
UNREAL PAST
The past tense is sometimes used in English to refer to an 'unreal' situation. So, although the tense is the past, we are usually talking about the present, e.g. in a Type 2 conditional sentence: after the verb 'to wish';
The verb to wishThe verb to wish is followed by an 'unreal' past tense when we want to talk about situations in the present that we are not happy about but cannot change:
§ I wish I had more money (=but I haven't)
§ She wishes she was beautiful (= but she's not)
§ We wish we could come to your party (but we can't)
When we want to talk about situations in the past that we are not happy about or actions that we regret, we use the verb to wish followed by the past perfect:
§ I wish I hadn't said that (= but I did)
§ He wishes he hadn't bought the car (= but he did buy it.)
§ I wish I had taken that job in New York (= but I didn't, so I'm stuck in Bristol)
NOTE: When we want to talk about situations we are not happy about and where we want someone else to change them, we use to wish followed by would + infinitive:
§ I wish he would stop smoking. (= I don't like it, I want him to change it)
§ I wish you would go away. (= I don't want you here, I want you to take some action)
§ I wish you wouldn't squeeze

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Note added at 2002-05-10 19:09:30 (GMT)
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another source:
http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/061.html
subjunctive after wish. Yet another traditional rule requires you to use were rather than was in a contrary-to-fact statement that follows the verb wish: I wish I were (not was) lighter on my feet. Many writers continue to insist on this rule, but the indicative was in such clauses can be found in the works of many well-known writers.


    Reference: http://www.edufind.com/english/grammar/IF10.cfm
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 18:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1252

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Chris Rowson: I would have said that all of these were subjunctives. Or are subjunctives.
6 hrs
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