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defensive limes

English translation: fortified border defense system; fortified walls [ramparts]

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:defensive limes
English translation:fortified border defense system; fortified walls [ramparts]
Entered by: Berni Armstrong
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09:54 May 28, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
/ History - Defensive Installations
English term or phrase: defensive limes
Thanks to the reinforcement of the defensive
limes from ca. 1725 the Tartars were no longer free to range unimpeded over ...
Vladimir Pochinov
Russian Federation
Local time: 20:47
limes is actually Latin
Explanation:
and means border, fortified wall, fortified ramparts (like the Adrian Wall in Britain, if memory does not betray me)

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Note added at 2002-05-28 12:07:34 (GMT)
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Vladimir, I suggest that you digit the following 3-word string on Google (or any other search engine): limes stone wall. You\'ll find plenty of material there, but I can anticipate what I suspected, i.e. that the Roman limes was mainly made of stone. Nevertheless, the writer of your text may well have used this term improperly (the Romans never went as far as Russia...) and actually meant a wooden stockade.
Selected response from:

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 19:47
Grading comment
Thank you, everybody.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6limes is actually Latin
Francesco D'Alessandro
5(Roman) fortified border defense systemMarianneH
4stockade
Hanna Burdon


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
limes is actually Latin


Explanation:
and means border, fortified wall, fortified ramparts (like the Adrian Wall in Britain, if memory does not betray me)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-28 12:07:34 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Vladimir, I suggest that you digit the following 3-word string on Google (or any other search engine): limes stone wall. You\'ll find plenty of material there, but I can anticipate what I suspected, i.e. that the Roman limes was mainly made of stone. Nevertheless, the writer of your text may well have used this term improperly (the Romans never went as far as Russia...) and actually meant a wooden stockade.

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 19:47
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 12
Grading comment
Thank you, everybody.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Hanna Burdon: http://www.bartleby.com/61/34/L0173400.html
8 mins

agree  Klaus Herrmann: Yes, this is what I recall from Latin classes.
16 mins

agree  Fernando Muela
24 mins

agree  Piotr Kurek: ancient Roman frontier fortification; fortified border
36 mins

agree  Petra Winter
2 hrs

agree  jerrie
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
stockade


Explanation:
Perhaps you might use the word "stockade"? It is a sort of defensive barrier made of wood and Webster's actually mentions that the posts were sharpened.

STOCKADE, n. [See Stoccade.]
1. In fortification, a sharpened post or stake set in the earth.
2. A line of posts or stakes set in the earth as a fence or barrier.
http://65.66.134.201/cgi-bin/webster/webster.exe?search_for_...

stockade
a strong wooden fence built around an area to defend it against attack
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=stockade*1 0


    Reference: http://65.66.134.201/cgi-bin/webster/webster.exe?search_for_...
Hanna Burdon
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:47
Native speaker of: Polish
PRO pts in pair: 12
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
(Roman) fortified border defense system


Explanation:
I would say both stone and wood. Both palisades and Hadrian's wall are mentioned.


http://kuhttp.cc.ukans.edu/kansas/aarhms/bishko.html
"From the frontier standpoints the Middle Ages begin with the collapse of the Roman fortified border defense system, the limes;...."

From: http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/history/HIEU103FX.html
Most noteworthy is the so called "Limes Policy, associated with the Flavians, Hadrian, and Antoninus Pius." Wherever natural frontiers did not exist, the Romans created an artifical one by building palisades and walls. The famous examples include a barrier from the Rhine to the Danube across the Agri Decumates, a wall to cut short the delta of the Danube, and of course Hadrian's and the Antonine walls in Britain.


Also:

http://onlinedictionary.datasegment.com/word/lime has this quote, somewhat on the side: "2. To entangle; to insnare. We had limed ourselves With open eyes, and we must take the chance. --Tennyson."

In Macbeth:
"LADY MACDUFF Poor bird! thou'ldst never fear the net nor lime,
The pitfall nor the gin."



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Note added at 2002-05-28 14:27:57 (GMT)
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And a search for ROMAN LIMES got me this fantastic page!

http://home.t-online.de/home/Bernd.Hummel/limeng.htm


    Reference: http://kuhttp.cc.ukans.edu/kansas/aarhms/bishko.html
MarianneH
PRO pts in pair: 4
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