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fast

English translation: I am going nowhere fast

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21:57 Aug 24, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: fast
I go nowhere, fast.
This is an answer in a questionnaire. Q: "When your are going somewhere,..." A: "I'm usually early/on time/late, I get lost, I never show up" and "I go nowhere, fast".
It's almost midnight and I'm probably just braindead after a long day, but I don't get the meaning of this. Why is there a reference to speed? Why the comma? Or could it be that Americans have adopted the German word "fast" (i.e. almost) by now???
Feels like I'm going nowhere...
Any suggestions welcome!
Nulli
Local time: 19:43
English translation:I am going nowhere fast
Explanation:
It is almost always used as I've shown in the present continuous tense, rather than the present simple.

If "I am getting nowhere fast", it means that "I am trying to achieve something but am making absolutely no progress".

It is a typically ironic English turn of phrase. The irony is in the oxymoron as of course it is impossible to get nowhere fast.

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Note added at 2002-08-24 22:01:21 (GMT)
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NB normally \"getting nowhere\" rather than \"going nowhere\"
Selected response from:

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:43
Grading comment
as I said, braindead....
Thanks for your help
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +9I am going nowhere fast
Libero_Lang_Lab
1 +3(not an answer)
Jack Doughty


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
I am going nowhere fast


Explanation:
It is almost always used as I've shown in the present continuous tense, rather than the present simple.

If "I am getting nowhere fast", it means that "I am trying to achieve something but am making absolutely no progress".

It is a typically ironic English turn of phrase. The irony is in the oxymoron as of course it is impossible to get nowhere fast.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-24 22:01:21 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

NB normally \"getting nowhere\" rather than \"going nowhere\"

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:43
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 137
Grading comment
as I said, braindead....
Thanks for your help

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Tovbin
6 mins
  -> spasibo vam

agree  Jack Doughty: Well explained.
28 mins
  -> thanks jack!

agree  Kim Metzger: Since "go nowhere fast" is one of the options for answering the question, the present tense makes sense.
43 mins
  -> true

agree  RHELLER: probably a humorous last choice
1 hr
  -> yes, that's it, it's what keeps multiple choice compilers sane I suspect

agree  aivars: bring up another glorious quote Dan
2 hrs
  -> Okay - how about Ambrose Pierce's definition of the study of philosophy: Philosophy, n. A route of many roads leading from nowhere to nothing.

agree  Chris Rowson: better to get there fast than slow :-)
7 hrs
  -> i agree - what were they on about in the hare and the tortoise...

agree  Piotr Kurek: qed
7 hrs
  -> ipso facto

agree  Ester Vidal
9 hrs
  -> You any relation of Gore's?

agree  jerrie: A hamster in a wheel
10 hrs
  -> ....is better than two in the bush
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +3
(not an answer)


Explanation:
I can't improve on Dan Brennan's answer, but I found at least three songs on this theme. Here are the lyrics of one of them.

Nowhere Fast

Lyrics by: Ian Brown
Song by: John Squire, Ian Brown, Andy Couzens
Written: 1985

You're thinking about your money
You're careering off the track
You're too busy doing nothing
You don't see that it won't last
Well you're strung across the age gap
All your friends spinning down the drain
And you're prone to that old cliche
'If I could only have my time again'

Hand after hand out
Where's your self-respect?
Your wardrobes all second handed
Where's your magic now?

Think you're the Artful Dodger
You can only dodge for so long
And when Fagin pulls your plug out
You won't know what went wrong

Hand after hand out
Where's your self-respect?
Your wardrobes all second handed
Where's your magic now?

Nowhere fast
You're getting nowhere fast
Just a little bit
Just a little bit

Well you're strung across the age gap
All your friends spinning down the drain
And you're prone to that old cliche
'If I could only have my time again'

Hand after hand out
Where's your self-respect?
Your wardrobes all second handed
Where's your magic now?

Nowhere fast
You're getting nowhere fast
Just a little bit
Just a little bit

You're getting nowhere fast.


Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4102

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libero_Lang_Lab: !!! Bravo !!!
13 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  Ester Vidal: Thanks for ths music, Jack!
8 hrs
  -> I don't even know the music!

agree  jerrie: What an excellent way to start a Sunday morning! The Monkey Man!
9 hrs
  -> I'll take your word for it on the Monkey Man, it's just a lyric to me.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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