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pram / stroller

English translation: pram (baby sleeps in) / stroller (baby/child sits up in)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:pram (perambulator) / stroller
English translation:pram (baby sleeps in) / stroller (baby/child sits up in)
Entered by: socratisv
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13:29 Jul 5, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Other / children/baby accessories
English term or phrase: pram / stroller
I am looking for the difference of these two terms in Australian English.
Thank you in advance,
S.
socratisv
Greece
The difference from an Australian.
Explanation:
A pram is the bigger of the two, It is heaver and is made more rigid, has better wheels and comes with a full set of covers. and the baby can sleep in it. Cost over $200.AU

A stroller is the light framed type, the type you would take out for the weekend to the beach, folds down to be very small, is very uncomfortable for the baby, Ie it cannot sleep in it, Prices start at $30.AU,
All the rest have different names, like off road buggy, 3 wheel pram or what ever clever marketing name they come up with. But the difference between the ones you asked about are explained above. A pram is not a stroller and a stroller is not a pram.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day18 hrs (2008-07-07 08:10:20 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry if my comment offended you Richard,
When you try to say something in the limits of the allowed space, the message can sound short, when you try to make someone smile.
Selected response from:

Gary D
Local time: 04:11
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2The difference from an Australian.
Gary D
5 +2landau - poussetteGhyslaine LE NAGARD
4 +3pram / stroller
William [Bill] Gray
5 +1explanation and images
Heidi C
4 +1see quotes
Nicole Y. Adams, M.A.


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
landau - poussette


Explanation:
.

Ghyslaine LE NAGARD
New Caledonia
Local time: 05:11
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you very much for your answer; it did help me to see the difference between these two terms;)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: any refs? that sounds suspiciously French to me. this is an English-English question
17 mins

neutral  fourth: Lovely!Pure 19thC. With lace frills?
2 hrs

agree  Richard Benham: Quite correct as French explanations of the Australian English terms.
8 hrs

agree  Tony M: Answerer was thoughtful enough to think that a second language version might help, and I'm sure it did.
22 hrs
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
explanation and images


Explanation:
Pram used mostly in British English
(abbreviation for perambulator, syn: baby carriage )

A baby pram is another name for a baby carriage. It is a back facing bassinet-style stroller with high wheels and extra padding. www.glossary-of-terms.net/glossary-of-stroller-terms.html

Pram, See a picture here: www.healthchecksystems.com
Stroller, see a piecture here: www.gamleys.co.uk

A stroller a fold-up child seat that is light enough and compact enough to allow for easy storage. http://www.pregnancy-place.com/A_Glossary_of_Stroller_Terms_...

Heidi C
Local time: 14:11
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you;)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: Asker wants the "Australian" terms. your refs are all UK............
5 mins
  -> The difference between a pram and a stroller can be found by looking in a dictionary and looking at illustrations.

neutral  William [Bill] Gray: New Zealand English has more British tendencies than Australian, but both are a distinct flavour. Therefore Microsoft has a language variant for both in Word.
21 mins
  -> the difference between a pram and a stroller (and what they look like) is exactly the same in any variant of English. And this is not an IT term.

agree  Gary D: you are right on the stroller, but a pram can have the child/ children (for twins) facing either way
8 hrs
  -> you are right Gary. I just quoted the definition. Thanks :)
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
pram / stroller


Explanation:
These terms are perfectly acceptable in Australia, but they also use "Buggy" for 3-wheeled strollers and "Basinette" for the removable part of a baby's pram.
(You will find references to these terms also on the links provided below)

Hope this helps, and answers the concerns "writeaway"!



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-07-05 16:43:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And if you look further here:
http://barinya.com/australia/mother_and_baby/prams.htm
you will find that the Aussies REALLY take their prams seriously!!!




    Reference: http://www.babybunting.com.au/search.php?page=12&&key_words=...
    Reference: http://www.babybunting.com.au/search.php?page=4&&key_words=p...
William [Bill] Gray
Norway
Local time: 20:11
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 38
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you;)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: I looked at a lot of OZ sites. they use the whole range of terms. Agree that OZ terms are not necessarily like UK English at all. :-)
50 mins
  -> Thanks, writeaway!

agree  fourth: It's an education! I didn't know prams still existed. Mine was in plywood, stuck a broomstick in it and made a tank. Of course
1 hr
  -> Thanks, fourth! I have also pushed a plywood pram!

agree  Demi Ebrite: 'Pram' and 'Stroller' are the same item in AU - examples of both: http://www.babycarriages.com.au/products.php?db=d_prams&sear... ~ http://www.babiesgalore.com.au/show_product_
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Demi!

disagree  Gary D: a pram is not a stroller and and a stroller is not a pram
8 hrs

agree  Richard Benham: Hmmm. To me, a "pram" is for a very young baby to lie in while being pushed along, whereas in a "stroller" or "pusher" the child sits up. And a "bassinet(te)" (note double "s") is essentially a basket, although pram/bassinet combinations exist of course.
8 hrs
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1 day2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
see quotes


Explanation:
I'm with Gary on this one (only that in my mind the distinction has to o with the child's age, i.e. newborns/babies go in prams and slightly older babies and toddlers go in strollers) and I just wanted to quote these definitions (not for points):

****
"Carriages and prams

A baby carriage (in North American English), perambulator (in British English, perambulator is usually shortened to pram) or carrycot is generally used for newborn babies and have the infant lying down facing the pusher.

Prams have been widely used in the UK since the Victorian era. As they developed through the years suspension was added, making the ride smoother for both the baby and the person pushing it. In the 1970s, however, the trend was more towards a more basic version, not fully sprung, and with a detachable body known as a carrycot. Now prams are very rarely used, being large and expensive when compared with buggies (see below). One of the longer lived and better known brands in the UK is Silver Cross, first manufactured in Guiseley, near Leeds, in 1877, though this factory has now closed.

[edit] Strollers and pushchairs
Stroller
Stroller

Further information: Stroller history

A stroller (North American English) or push chair (British English, also sometimes buggy) has the child (generally up to three years old) in a sitting position, usually facing forwards, instead of facing the pusher.

Strollers for multiple infants include the twin (side-by-side) and the tandem configurations.

Pushchair was the popularly used term in the UK between its invention and the early 1980s, when a more compact design known as a buggy became the trend, popularised by the conveniently collapsible aluminium framed Maclaren buggy designed and patented by the British aeronautical designer Owen Maclaren in 1965. Pushchair is the usual term in the UK, but is becoming increasingly replaced by buggy; in American English, buggy is synonymous with baby carriage. Newer versions can be configured to carry a baby lying down like a low pram and then be reconfigured to carry the child in the forward-facing position.

There are a variety of twin pushchairs now manufactured, some designed for babies of a similar age (such as twins) and some for those with a small age gap. Some brands that manufacture twin strollers are Maclaren, Peg Perego, Baby Jogger, and phil&teds.

Triple pushchairs are a fairly recent addition, due to the number of multiple births being on the increase. Safety guidelines for standard pushchairs apply. Most triple buggies have a weight limit of 50 kg and recommended use for children up to the age of 4 years."

****
"


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_transport
Nicole Y. Adams, M.A.
Australia
Local time: 04:11
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gary D
15 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
The difference from an Australian.


Explanation:
A pram is the bigger of the two, It is heaver and is made more rigid, has better wheels and comes with a full set of covers. and the baby can sleep in it. Cost over $200.AU

A stroller is the light framed type, the type you would take out for the weekend to the beach, folds down to be very small, is very uncomfortable for the baby, Ie it cannot sleep in it, Prices start at $30.AU,
All the rest have different names, like off road buggy, 3 wheel pram or what ever clever marketing name they come up with. But the difference between the ones you asked about are explained above. A pram is not a stroller and a stroller is not a pram.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day18 hrs (2008-07-07 08:10:20 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry if my comment offended you Richard,
When you try to say something in the limits of the allowed space, the message can sound short, when you try to make someone smile.

Gary D
Local time: 04:11
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Benham: THe point is the baby lies in a pram and sits up in a stroller. I have always called the latter a "pusher", btw. And did you know that in many places prams (and possibly strollers) were legally classed as motor vehicles?//Speak for yourself!!
10 mins
  -> Thanks, I have heard pusher in NZ, and there are a lot of Kiwis in Au, but we (Australians) don't use pusher.

disagree  Demi Ebrite: The usage of the words 'pram' and 'stroller', by Australian product marketers, is synonymous. The difference is the age of the target market - pram is an old recognised name, stroller is more modern. Check out Glenhuntly products, 1st URL
1 hr
  -> Strange, I have 3 kids, I am Australian, and have lived here all my life, and you are telling me I am incorrect???

agree  Adde: Good explanation, but also modern prams can be turned into strollers, i.e. pram & stroller, a combination of the two. I think that's why the terms are used as synonymous (of course, I'm not a native speaker of English, only guessing)
10 hrs
  -> Thank You

agree  Nicole Y. Adams, M.A.
17 hrs
  -> Thank you
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Changes made by editors
Jul 7, 2008 - Changes made by socratisv:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/65327">socratisv's</a> old entry - "pram / stroller" » "pram (baby sleeps in) / stroller (baby/child sits up in) "
Jul 7, 2008 - Changes made by socratisv:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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