KudoZ home » English » Other

go round the roses

English translation: comment

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
09:14 Jul 12, 2008
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other / Idioms
English term or phrase: go round the roses
Hi,

I can't remember where I heard this, on TV somewhere, but it seemed to be used in the meaning of either "to fight" (i.e. physically) or "to quarrel" (i.e. verbally).

Best wishes,

Simon
SeiTT
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:20
English translation:comment
Explanation:
Practically all the ghits are for the song titled 'Sally go round the roses' (and variants thereof). According to the wikipedia entry cited by orientalhorizon, the lyrics are taken from a skip-rope chant, which means the expression *might* be related to or originate from a folk dance. jig. or other type of 'choreographed' activity (i.e. with a prescribed sequence of movements).

That being said, I've never heard the expression used in real life (as a NA native).

A possibly related expression is 'ring around the rosie' (and variants), such as in the children's rhyme 'ring around the rosie, a pocket full of posies...', which is a song for a children's game in which the players join hands and move around in a circle.

This could conceivably be used in a figurative and perhaps derogatory sense with respect to a fight or argument if the persons involved keep circling each other or the issue instead of actually coming to blows or tackling the issue directly.

see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_a_Ring_o'_Roses
Selected response from:

Ken Cox
Local time: 02:20
Grading comment
many thanks excellent
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5go to a fight with fire instead of roses
Gary D
3 +1commentKen Cox
2skirt around the issue
Tony M


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
skirt around the issue


Explanation:
Not terribly familiar expression, but I've always thought it meant 'to skirt around the issue' or 'avoid getting to the point' — like the much more familiar expression 'to beat about the bush'

Tony M
France
Local time: 02:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 148

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Moore: "Not terribly familiar" - that's the understatement of the year so far. I'm not saying no-one has ever said it, but it's certainly not an accepted form of words.
24 mins
  -> I agree; and as you said above, 'go round the houses' is MUCH more common. I think this may be old-fashioned or regional.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
go to a fight with fire instead of roses


Explanation:
To go past the roses and go there to seek a fight.
Similar to
"to go there to pore fuel on the flames"
"You can't put out a fire with petrol" Fire = argument

It is very common in country Australia to use these sayings. And a thousand others


Gary D
Local time: 10:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
comment


Explanation:
Practically all the ghits are for the song titled 'Sally go round the roses' (and variants thereof). According to the wikipedia entry cited by orientalhorizon, the lyrics are taken from a skip-rope chant, which means the expression *might* be related to or originate from a folk dance. jig. or other type of 'choreographed' activity (i.e. with a prescribed sequence of movements).

That being said, I've never heard the expression used in real life (as a NA native).

A possibly related expression is 'ring around the rosie' (and variants), such as in the children's rhyme 'ring around the rosie, a pocket full of posies...', which is a song for a children's game in which the players join hands and move around in a circle.

This could conceivably be used in a figurative and perhaps derogatory sense with respect to a fight or argument if the persons involved keep circling each other or the issue instead of actually coming to blows or tackling the issue directly.

see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_a_Ring_o'_Roses

Ken Cox
Local time: 02:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56
Grading comment
many thanks excellent

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Benham: Supposedly about the bubonic plague.
45 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search