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10:42 Oct 22, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: church
Is church the original name?
what is the real meaning of this word?
J Lehlojane
English translation:See explanation
Explanation:
What does church mean?

Etymology of the word "church": Middle English "chirche", from Old English "cirice", ultimately from Late Greek "kyriakon", from Greek, neuter of "kyriakos": of the lord, from kyrios lord, master.

This is very interesting. According to one dictionary's etymology of the English word "church", it originated from a Greek word meaning "of the Lord".

The Greek word ekklesia, which is translated church, is a combination of the Greek word kaleo (which means to call) and ek, a preposition meaning out or out of. Therefore, ekklesia is properly translated as "called out ones".

So, while the common contemporary understanding of the word "church" is focusing upon a gathering, the actual meaning of the word is on our status as followers of Jesus. Within the context of His teachings that we are to be "in the world", but not "of the world", and that we are to hate our life "in this world", the application of being "the called out ones" is appropriate. The common usage which empowers the system of churchianity is not an appropriate interpretation of "ekklesia". For, the focus is not on the group, nor on the gathering of the group, but upon our status as belonging to the Lord and being called out of worldliness and self life.
http://www.discipleship.net/church.html

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Fernando Muela
Spain
Local time: 06:49
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Summary of answers provided
5 +2See explanation
Fernando Muela
5 +1AssemblyFuad Yahya
5 +1see bellow
Emilia Carneiro
5Etymologically...
María Alejandra Funes
3 +1dogma / school
Rolf Klischewski, M.A.


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
dogma / school


Explanation:
... may be correct alternatives in an IT context. After all, IT is swarming with "evangelists" theses days, who are nothing but product managers.

Rolf Klischewski, M.A.
Local time: 06:49
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Paul Svensson
3 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
see bellow


Explanation:
[Middle English chirche, from Old English cirice, ultimately from Medieval Greek kurikon, from Late Greek kuriakon (doma), the Lord's (house), from Greek kuriakos, of the lord, from kurios, lord.]

Defenitions:
. A building for public, especially Christian worship.
2. Often Church . a. The company of all Christians regarded as a mystic spiritual body. b. A specified Christian denomination: the Presbyterian Church. c. A congregation.
3. Public divine worship in a church; a religious service: goes to church at Christmas and Easter.
4. The clerical profession; clergy.
5. Ecclesiastical power as distinguished from the secular: the separation of church and state.
6. Christian Science. "The structure of Truth and Love" (Mary Baker Eddy).

verb, transitive
churched, churching, churches
To conduct a church service for, especially to perform a religious service for (a woman after childbirth).

adjective
Of or relating to the church; ecclesiastical.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition copyright © 1992 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Electronic version licensed from INSO Corporation; further reproduction and distribution restricted in accordance with the Copyright Law of the United States. All rights reserved.


Emilia Carneiro
Brazil
Local time: 01:49
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  eldira
3 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
See explanation


Explanation:
What does church mean?

Etymology of the word "church": Middle English "chirche", from Old English "cirice", ultimately from Late Greek "kyriakon", from Greek, neuter of "kyriakos": of the lord, from kyrios lord, master.

This is very interesting. According to one dictionary's etymology of the English word "church", it originated from a Greek word meaning "of the Lord".

The Greek word ekklesia, which is translated church, is a combination of the Greek word kaleo (which means to call) and ek, a preposition meaning out or out of. Therefore, ekklesia is properly translated as "called out ones".

So, while the common contemporary understanding of the word "church" is focusing upon a gathering, the actual meaning of the word is on our status as followers of Jesus. Within the context of His teachings that we are to be "in the world", but not "of the world", and that we are to hate our life "in this world", the application of being "the called out ones" is appropriate. The common usage which empowers the system of churchianity is not an appropriate interpretation of "ekklesia". For, the focus is not on the group, nor on the gathering of the group, but upon our status as belonging to the Lord and being called out of worldliness and self life.
http://www.discipleship.net/church.html



Fernando Muela
Spain
Local time: 06:49
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 4
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Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl: hard to choose from three good suggestions
31 mins

agree  xxxKanta Rawat
1 hr
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Assembly


Explanation:
The word "church" comes from Middle English "chirche," from Old English "cirice," ultimately from Medieval Greek "kûrikon," from Late Greek "kûriakon dôma" ("the Lord's house".

The theological derivation, however, is somewhat different. "Church" stands for the Greek term "ecclesia," which means "assembly." The following page explains a bit about the word "ecclesia."


Fuad

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Note added at 2002-10-22 10:56:01 (GMT)
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http://www.theexaminer.org/volume5/number6/ecclesia.htm

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Note added at 2002-10-22 10:56:45 (GMT)
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The derivation of \"church\" above is from the American Heritage Dictionary.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 893

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agree  AhmedAMS
4 days
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Etymologically...


Explanation:
Etymologically, a "church" is the "Lord's house". Its ultimate source is Greek "kürios" "lord, master" (perhaps mos familiar nowadays from the words of the choral mass "kyrie eleison" "lord have mercy"). The adjective derived from this was "küriakós", whose use in the phrase "house of the lord" led to its use as a noun, "kürikón". The medieval Greek form, "kürkón", "house of worship" was borrowed into West Germanic as *kirika, producing eventually German "Kirche" and English "church". The Scots form "kirk" from Old Norse "kirkja", which in turn was borrowed from Old English.


    "Dictionary of Word Origins" by John Ayto
María Alejandra Funes
Local time: 01:49
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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