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They are finished up there. Cut it out.

English translation: Left the ship..

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19:51 Jan 3, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: They are finished up there. Cut it out.
What did you like about the trip (to US), Ringo [Starr]?

Oh, I just loved all of it, espoecially the trip to Miami. The sun, you know. I did not know what it meant till I went over there.

Don't you get it up in Liverpool?

No, they are finished up there, you know. Cut it out.

interview with Beatles
Lacrimosa
Local time: 21:31
English translation:Left the ship..
Explanation:
Strange question, because the complete quote is:
"
Q: "Don't you get it up in Liverpool?"
RINGO: "No, they're finished up there, you know. They've cut it out.
(laughter)
"
follow the link for complete interview
Selected response from:

xxxluisantos
Local time: 20:31
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2 +5I wouldn't peer too deeply into this
Arthur Borges
3 +4(when it comes to sun) they are finished (up there, in Liverpool), you know.
jerrie
3 +1Left the ship..xxxluisantos
1 +2Liverpool is a bleak and desolate place (by comparison to Miami). (Please) don't publish that.Peter Coles


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +5
I wouldn't peer too deeply into this


Explanation:
The Beatles were famous for their music and witty replies but also for smoking hash and consuming, uh, other controlled substances.

He may well have jumped from the question to, say, a remark about the lighting technicians.

"Cut it out" usually means "stop it!".

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Note added at 2003-01-03 20:01:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Unless you find somebody who was physically present, or have visual footage of the lad, YOUR guess is as good as anybody else\'s!

Arthur Borges
China
Local time: 03:31
PRO pts in pair: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elisabeth Ghysels
23 mins
  -> Oh, I get high with a little help from my friends.

agree  NancyLynn: that sounds just right
40 mins
  -> Oh, I get by with a little help from my friends...

agree  Terry Burgess: ..and if You, Elisabeth, and Nancy --NEED ANYBODY!...then just "BW" givus a shout:-)
3 hrs
  -> We're Sgt. Pepper's...

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: very good!
4 hrs

neutral  Refugio: Not even a Beatle would say, cut it out, to mean please don't publish this.
6 hrs
  -> Under Peter Coles below, I meant it as "drop this conversation subject" an nowise imply them likely to try to gag a journalist.

agree  Christopher Crockett: mmmm... Ringo was more than a bit dodgy, even if you happened upon him straight, as I recall.
21 hrs
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
(when it comes to sun) they are finished (up there, in Liverpool), you know.


Explanation:
They are finished - they lose out, they're not lucky, it's all over.

Don't you get any sun in Liverpool?

No. They are finished (It's all over for them when it comes to sunshine), up there, you know? Cut it out (Stop taking the mickey, leave it out, are you joking).

All washed up. Run aground.

Like Arthur said, this is pure guesswork...just a vague interpretation as what might possibly have been meant!

hth

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Note added at 2003-01-05 10:34:23 (GMT)
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Second interpretation (from this question #2)

Don\'t you \'get it up\' in Liverpool?

(To get it up = to get an erection)

No, they\'re finished up there (no chance, bunch of softies, lack of virility), you know. They\'ve cut it out (they\'ve given it up, they\'ve quit trying, no sex in Liverpool!)

Laughter.

This seems as likely as another interpretation...nothing like a smutty double meaning!

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elvira Stoianov
2 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Refugio: Your guesswork aligns with my guesswork. I think this is what he meant.
43 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Sarah Ponting
12 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Christopher Crockett: That's the sense of it, such as it is. "Taking the mickey" ? Now, whathahell does *that* mean???
20 hrs
  -> You're taking the mickey, aren't you? (You are having a laugh at my expense). Aka taking the michael (?), taking the p***, basically, making fun of....hth
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Liverpool is a bleak and desolate place (by comparison to Miami). (Please) don't publish that.


Explanation:
My best suggestion is that this was a weak attempt at humour.

However, the "cut it out" could be completely unrelated and could equally mean something like "stop throwing those peanuts at me John".

All of which really does little other than support Arthur's assertion that we can only guess.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-03 23:03:50 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Poor Lacrimosa

You seem to have been grappling with this interview for several days now. Are you actually trying to translate it? It really is incomprehensible in places, even to this native GB English speaker, who is married to somebody brought up just outside Liverpool.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-03 23:16:19 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Poor Lacrimosa

You seem to have been grappling with this interview for several days now. Are you actually trying to translate it? It really is incomprehensible in places, even to this native GB English speaker, who is married to somebody brought up just outside Liverpool.

Peter Coles
Local time: 20:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 47

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Refugio: Cut it out here almost certainly means quit your kidding.
24 mins
  -> I'm impressed at your confidence given the paucity of data, and you're almost certainly right :-)

agree  Arthur Borges: That it could mean "stop throwing peanuts" AS EASILY AS "drop the subject - you've no idea what Liverpool weather is like."
48 mins

agree  Herman Vilella: too much coke breaks the bag and the Devil only knows, but I agree with Borges
2 hrs

agree  Christopher Crockett: Have to agree with Ruth's disagreement, but, over all you're making as much sense as anyone. And more than Ringo (not hard, that last). "Peanuts"'?? What "peanuts"??? Who said anything about "peanuts" ?????
19 hrs
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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Left the ship..


Explanation:
Strange question, because the complete quote is:
"
Q: "Don't you get it up in Liverpool?"
RINGO: "No, they're finished up there, you know. They've cut it out.
(laughter)
"
follow the link for complete interview


    Reference: http://www.geocities.com/~beatleboy1/db22264.int.html
xxxluisantos
Local time: 20:31
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes, the text on that site is "They've cut it out", not "cut it out." Even more inegmatic, if possible. "They" [which "they"?] have cut "it" [the sun?] out? What does "left the ship" mean ???
1 hr
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