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bivalve

English translation: mollusk, such as an oyster or a clam, that has a shell consisting of two hinged valves

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:bivalve
English translation:mollusk, such as an oyster or a clam, that has a shell consisting of two hinged valves
Entered by: Nikita Kobrin
Options:
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01:07 Jan 5, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: bivalve
Are you a bivalve?
Vanessa
A mollusk, such as an oyster or a clam,
Explanation:
that has a shell consisting of two hinged valves.

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Note added at 2003-01-05 01:17:05 (GMT)
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A mollusk having a shell consisting of two lateral plates or valves joined together by an elastic ligament at the hinge, which is usually strengthened by prominences called teeth. The shell is closed by the contraction of two transverse muscles attached to the inner surface, as in the clam, or by one, as in the oyster.

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Note added at 2003-01-05 01:30:30 (GMT)
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But I have a very vague idea what an asker can mean asking another person such a question. Perhaps it means that a person has something which is opened and shut as two shells or valves of an oyster?
Selected response from:

Nikita Kobrin
Lithuania
Local time: 14:45
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8A mollusk, such as an oyster or a clam,
Nikita Kobrin
4 +5Has the cat got your tongue?Refugio
4Let the reader relish his own intelligence,Herman Vilella


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
A mollusk, such as an oyster or a clam,


Explanation:
that has a shell consisting of two hinged valves.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-05 01:17:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A mollusk having a shell consisting of two lateral plates or valves joined together by an elastic ligament at the hinge, which is usually strengthened by prominences called teeth. The shell is closed by the contraction of two transverse muscles attached to the inner surface, as in the clam, or by one, as in the oyster.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-05 01:30:30 (GMT)
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But I have a very vague idea what an asker can mean asking another person such a question. Perhaps it means that a person has something which is opened and shut as two shells or valves of an oyster?

Nikita Kobrin
Lithuania
Local time: 14:45
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 35
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn
27 mins

agree  JCEC
33 mins

agree  Amy Williams: mollusk/mollusc?I don't know. But as for somone being a bivalve - are we underwater?
1 hr

agree  María del Carmen Cerda
1 hr

agree  yeswhere: with definition, but this could be an insult to the intellect implying 'low on the evolution scale'.
3 hrs
  -> Yes, your interpretation looks quite convincing.

agree  Chris Rowson: mollusc - and I think yeswhere has the right interpretation
6 hrs

agree  Marie Scarano: both these alternatives are correct, but it will depend on the rest fo the context
7 hrs
  -> Exactly: everything depends on context.

agree  Patricia CASEY
12 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Has the cat got your tongue?


Explanation:
Of course, cats have nothing to do with bivalves, but it is another way of saying, why are you so quiet? To clam up is to become silent.

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Note added at 2003-01-05 04:41:17 (GMT)
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In answer to Nikita\'s question, yes, it does mean that \"a person has something which is opened and shut as two shells of a bivalve.\" That something is the person\'s mouth.


Refugio
Local time: 04:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 485

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrea Ali: Same in Spanish "te comieron la lengua los ratones" or maybe "aburrido como una ostra". It might refer to sb boring?
18 mins
  -> It doesnt really have that connotation in English (boring). We do say, however, and who knows why, happy as a clam.

agree  Marie Scarano: both these interpretations are correct, but it will depend on the rest of the context
4 hrs
  -> Thanks Marie

agree  Nikita Kobrin: Ruth, I like your interpretation of "two shells" though I'm not sure it's a right one. As for the feeling of satisfaction in Russian we say "happy as a cockroach" :-)
8 hrs
  -> Thank you, but it is not my interpretation. To clam up is standard usage.

agree  Patricia CASEY
8 hrs
  -> Thanks Patricia

agree  Heather Starastin: "Clamming up" is good :-)
11 hrs
  -> Thanks Heather
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Let the reader relish his own intelligence,


Explanation:
I would leave it bivalve -IF, as it seems, someone is asking someone else if s/he "always clams up", or so "clammed up".

Herman Vilella
Local time: 13:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 14
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