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in-depth series

English translation: In this case, not intellectual but "more substance"

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16:43 Jan 7, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: in-depth series
I was talking with a reporter [MAureen Cleave] who also happened to be a friend of mine. It was sort of an in-depth series she was doing, so I wasn't really thinking in terms of PR.

John Lennon talking about the interview in wich he said that the beatles were more popular than Jesus.

Does in-depth mean intellectual?
Lacrimosa
Local time: 02:28
English translation:In this case, not intellectual but "more substance"
Explanation:
John's use of this term here refers to his perception that the interview was going to be about more significant things in the Beatles' career. Essentially he is saying here that he wasn't treating the interview as a press conference, where public image is much more important to maintain. He expected the interviewer, a friend of his, to be more interested in deeper details, so he felt more relaxed and less concerned about what was on the surface. Hence, in this case, "in-depth" refers to the significant aspects of the Beatles, not their surface/PR-oriented aspects.

(That quote is one of the best for demonstrating the true power of words!)
Selected response from:

William Clough
United States
Local time: 20:28
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +10probing, detailed, going beneath the surface
jerrie
5In this case, not intellectual but "more substance"
William Clough


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
probing, detailed, going beneath the surface


Explanation:
get all the background information
deep research into all areas

hth

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  swisstell
1 min
  -> Thanks

agree  Andy Watkinson
6 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Jack Doughty
9 mins

agree  xxxEDLING
18 mins

agree  Sarah Ponting
22 mins

agree  Nikita Kobrin
22 mins

agree  jccantrell
30 mins

agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes. As opposed to "superficial."
1 hr

agree  Fuad Yahya
6 hrs

agree  Refugio
12 hrs
  -> Thanks everybody!!!!!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
In this case, not intellectual but "more substance"


Explanation:
John's use of this term here refers to his perception that the interview was going to be about more significant things in the Beatles' career. Essentially he is saying here that he wasn't treating the interview as a press conference, where public image is much more important to maintain. He expected the interviewer, a friend of his, to be more interested in deeper details, so he felt more relaxed and less concerned about what was on the surface. Hence, in this case, "in-depth" refers to the significant aspects of the Beatles, not their surface/PR-oriented aspects.

(That quote is one of the best for demonstrating the true power of words!)

William Clough
United States
Local time: 20:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Right : it may or may not be "intellectual" but one would expect (if the reporter were competent) "more substance." "In depth" as opposed to "shallow."
45 mins
  -> Very true.

disagree  Refugio: I think, and apparently most of my colleagues agree, that Jerrie's answer comes much closer to the meaning of this expression.
11 hrs
  -> No offense, but the descriptions seem all but alike. More substantive aspects of the interview would be "probing, beneath the surface, etc." I was merely explaining John's purpose in using such a phrase.
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