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Bad Eggs in Adelaide

English translation: I don't know if it is at all related, but in looking up bad eggs in Adelaide,

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19:04 Jan 7, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Bad Eggs in Adelaide
When I first heard the controversy in America, I thought it could not be true. It was just one of those things like Bad eggs in Adelaide and when i realized it was serious I was worried stiff because I knew how it could go on and on and I could not control it
Lacrimosa
Local time: 21:27
English translation:I don't know if it is at all related, but in looking up bad eggs in Adelaide,
Explanation:
I came across a number of references to the hydrogen sulfide produced in the fermentation of wine in Adelaide (caused by the nitrogen content of the local grapes), and how difficult it is to control the smell. Apparently it has a low threshold of perception, so that even harmless amounts are unpleasant. Could John have been referring to the acceptance of and getting used to this unpleasantness, knowing it is no real threat? Maybe it is a local joke. He does imply that when he first heard of the controversy, he thought it was nothing, something that would "blow over" and dissipate, like the smell of bad eggs. All this is pure speculation of course. ;~)
Selected response from:

Refugio
Local time: 12:27
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3not being able to lose your reputation
jerrie
2 +1both of the aboveChris Rowson
2note:
yeswhere
1 +1I don't know if it is at all related, but in looking up bad eggs in Adelaide,Refugio
1Reference to a personal experiencePeter Coles


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
not being able to lose your reputation


Explanation:
"When the early colonists began building Adelaide they built with stone, constructing a solid, dignified city that is civilised and calm in a way that no other Australian state capital can match. The solidity goes further than architecture, for Adelaide was once regarded as a city of wowsers (read: puritan spoilsports) and was renowned chiefly for its disproportionately large number of churches. These days, the churches are outnumbered by pubs and nightclubs, and there is no denying that the city has a superb setting - the centre is surrounded by green parkland, and the metropolitan area is bound by the hills of the Mt Lofty Ranges and the waters of the Gulf St Vincent."

This paragraph appears on a number of web-sites.

A bad egg = spoilsport.

It could be that John means that just as Adelaide was regarded as the city of spoilsports , he will always be known as the Beatle who said the Beatles were more popular than Jesus.

Just as there is more to Adelaide than churches, there is more to the Beatles than John's careless comment.

John was hoping that just as everyone knows that Adelaide is not populated by spoilsports, everyone would be able to see beyond his comment, and not take it too seriously.

Just an idea.




jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Sounds possible.
6 mins
  -> Thanks...

agree  Hermann: plausible :-).
26 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  yeswhere: I think it
18 hrs
  -> Thanks
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
Reference to a personal experience


Explanation:
The Beatles toured Australia in 1964, including giving a press conference in Adelaide.

This could provide some support to Jerrie's theory which requires that John had some knowledge of Adelaide's history, but I'm doubtful. Most rock stars complain that they can't even keep track of which city they're in when on tour.

Rather I suspect that this is a reference to a personal experience (after the world revolves around pop stars doesn't it? with the rest of us tracking their every movement, so we would understand these obscure references, wouldn't we?). It could possibly refer to egg-based culinary experience that had a particularly striking effect on John, but more likely would be one of Ringo's practical jokes. Stink bombs are often observed to smell like bad eggs, and when I was a child (in the 60s) the release of one was traditionally greeted with the cry 'bad eggs'.

Peter Coles
Local time: 20:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 47

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  yeswhere: Possible, but I think it more refers to something like 'Murphy's Law' (meant to say this above, but somehow hit the' send' prematurely)
13 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
both of the above


Explanation:
My understanding of "bad egg" in general is very different from jerrie´s - I know the phrase as meaning not a spoilsport, but a person gone to the bad, like an egg gone bad. Bad smell and all that.

But this expression and interpretation belongs more to southern English intellectuals and the pre-war period than to down-to-earth Liverpudlians in the 60´s like John - though with him you can never be sure because he picked up a very wide range of cultural connections.

I don´t know if that is what is meant here. What I am fairly sure of is that jerrie is right in saying he means it is very hard to lose a reputation (whatever the "bad eggs in Adelaide" reputation may have been).

It is also quite likely that it was a personal experience, as Peter suggests, or a band experience - an "in joke". Maybe the band had had bad eggs served to them in Adelaide, and now every time anyone mentioned Adelaide to them they thought of it, and said "bad eggs in Adelaide", thinking of Adelaide as the city with the bad eggs. Or as Peter also suggests, it could have been a Ringo practical joke.

If you have to translate this, and no-one comes up with a more definite solution, my suggestion would be to translate it just as it is, quite literally. An English person who reads this (at least jerrie, Peter and I) doesn´t know exactly what he is referring to. But the idea that it "could go on and on" comes across without needing to understand the specific reference.

Chris Rowson
Local time: 21:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 243

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikita Kobrin: translate it just as it is, quite literally
3 days9 hrs
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
I don't know if it is at all related, but in looking up bad eggs in Adelaide,


Explanation:
I came across a number of references to the hydrogen sulfide produced in the fermentation of wine in Adelaide (caused by the nitrogen content of the local grapes), and how difficult it is to control the smell. Apparently it has a low threshold of perception, so that even harmless amounts are unpleasant. Could John have been referring to the acceptance of and getting used to this unpleasantness, knowing it is no real threat? Maybe it is a local joke. He does imply that when he first heard of the controversy, he thought it was nothing, something that would "blow over" and dissipate, like the smell of bad eggs. All this is pure speculation of course. ;~)

Refugio
Local time: 12:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 485

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  yeswhere: When things are going fine, something always seems to happen to spoil it, I think is the point of the saying. Your's and Jerrie's explanation confirm this.
9 hrs
  -> Actually, that is not what I am saying. I am saying that at first he thought it was no big deal.
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22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
note:


Explanation:
A good example of why we need translators and not just machines! Even in our native tongues we interpret phrases differently.
So my personal interpretation of this is that bad eggs in Adelaide is like Murphy's law, ie. something always goes wrong, nothing can be perfect. A well planned, perfect city was spoiled by spoilsports (Jerrie's interpretation) or bad sulphur smell (Ruth's).
Either way, the Beatles were at the height of their career and enjoying every success, when John made the "Jesus remark" which unfortunately offended some of the christian critics, and caused negative press for some time.

yeswhere
Local time: 15:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 20
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