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comma usage

English translation: It depends on

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:comma usage
English translation:It depends on
Entered by: Umutay Midinova
Options:
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13:43 Nov 12, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: comma usage
Dear collegues!
Could you please help me to determine whether I have to put a comma here or not.
Passage:
By default, (?) the system assumes 5-character document numbers.
Thank you very much in advance.
Tatiana Nefyodova
Russian Federation
Local time: 23:02
It depends on
Explanation:
If you want to emphisize the introduction (it could be treated as intoduction)put a comma, but if you think that it fits in the sentence no need of comma
Selected response from:

Umutay Midinova
Kyrgyzstan
Local time: 02:02
Grading comment
Having considered all the opinions, I've decided to leave my comma (deleting it would have produced too much additional work as the phrase appears rather often in a lot of separate files).
Thank you so much for your timely help!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +11use a comma
Sarah Ponting
4 +3The system assumes..... by defaultxxxCMJ_Trans
4 +3I would but ...xxxIanW
4 +1no commaxxxsergey
4 +1It depends on
Umutay Midinova


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +11
use a comma


Explanation:
I'd use a comma here

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Note added at 2003-11-12 13:51:19 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"By default, the system permits unlimited undo on images/volumes.\"

www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/internal/medx/ manual/UsersGuide/ch15word.pdf


\"By default, the system creates one currency for each active user of the system, and it funds these user currencies equally from the base currency.\"

www.eecs.harvard.edu/~sullivan/usenix2000/sect4.html


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-11-12 13:52:44 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Ian says, it\'s not a big problem if you don\'t use a comma in this phrase, although I would.

Sarah Ponting
Italy
Local time: 22:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 67

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria Danielson: a good guideline is whether you would pause when reading the sentence aloud
6 mins
  -> yes, that's what my English teacher used to say :-)

agree  David Moore: My view too
11 mins
  -> thanks, David :-)

agree  xxxElena Sgarbo: Ciao Sarah :-)
13 mins
  -> ciao Elena :-)

agree  J. Leo
21 mins
  -> thanks, James :-)

agree  NancyLynn
28 mins
  -> thanks, Nancy :-)

agree  vixen
40 mins
  -> thanks :-)

agree  Gordon Darroch
54 mins
  -> thanks, Gordon :-)

agree  Attila Piróth
1 hr
  -> thanks, Attila :-)

agree  jccantrell: I would also use the comma, but if you have doubts, try to rephrase the sentence so there is no doubt.
1 hr
  -> I'd be wary about rephrasing without more context

agree  Catherine Navarro
2 hrs
  -> thanks :-)

agree  senin
19 hrs
  -> thanks :-)
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
I would but ...


Explanation:
... I think the question of commas is a little more flexible in English than in other languages, such as German.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2003-11-12 13:50:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

My English teacher used to say \"If in doubt, leave it out\" - meaning that having too many commas is far worse than having too few. And that has always stayed with me.

Having said that, my immediate instinct in this case would be to use a comma. But I wouldn\'t lose any sleep over it.

xxxIanW
Local time: 22:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 235

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  J. Leo
20 mins

agree  Catherine Norton
3 hrs

agree  Chris Rowson: Yes, it´s flexible. I think the "pause" indication above is good. I would probably have left this comma out when I was working in IT, because this sort of sentence was so common I wouldn´t have paused. But I certainly wouldn´t have worried about it.
13 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
It depends on


Explanation:
If you want to emphisize the introduction (it could be treated as intoduction)put a comma, but if you think that it fits in the sentence no need of comma

Umutay Midinova
Kyrgyzstan
Local time: 02:02
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
Grading comment
Having considered all the opinions, I've decided to leave my comma (deleting it would have produced too much additional work as the phrase appears rather often in a lot of separate files).
Thank you so much for your timely help!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria-Jose Pastor: exactly, depends on where the emphasis is.
10 mins
  -> Thank you
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
The system assumes..... by default


Explanation:
I would put the "by default" at the end and without a comma. It feels more English this way

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 22:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 376

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Moore: I feel that changes the emphasis of the passage
1 min
  -> interesting - case of different value judgements - and I thought long and hard about this one!

agree  Henrik Brameus: I think it sounds more fluid, but it's difficult to say if you don't have the whole context.
17 mins

agree  jccantrell: My suggestion: If in doubt, rephrase!
1 hr

agree  Sally van der Graaff: It does sound much better reworded.
1 hr
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
no comma


Explanation:
permissible but unnecessary
emphasis or dramatic pause are not really necessary in technical texts:

Often the introductory adverb modifies just the verb, as does the word "often" in this sentence. When that is the case, a comma is usually not necessary, but sometimes the writer may prefer to use the comma for emphasis or to create a dramatic pause. Notice the different effects produced by including or omitting the comma:
--Often the introductory adverb modifies just the verb, as does the word "often" in this sentence.
--Often, the introductory adverb modifies just the verb, as does the word "often"in this sentence.
      As a general rule, however, it is best to avoid weighing your sentences down with permissible but unnecessary commas. Today's preferred style is uncluttered and expeditious, and most readers consider portentous pauses to be as annoying as speedbumps. Therefore, consider commas after introductory adverbs of this sort to be a heavy spice, to be used sparingly.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-11-12 19:28:32 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.grammartips.homestead.com/adverbs2.html

xxxsergey
Local time: 21:02
PRO pts in pair: 84

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  melayujati
5 hrs
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