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grade vs. mark

English translation: Not exactly the same (UK)

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20:48 Jan 9, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: grade vs. mark
Is there a diffrence? Is grade AE and mark BE or are they interchangeable?
TIA
Lydia Molea
Germany
Local time: 19:48
English translation:Not exactly the same (UK)
Explanation:
A grade is a category: A, B, C, ... or 1, 2, 3, ...
A mark is more like a score: 17/20, 85/100.
Of course, they are parallel scales: e.g. all marks in the range 85-100 might merit grade A.
In the UK, major exam results in secondary school are given as grades. Individual essays, reports, etc., may be given marks or grades.
Selected response from:

David Sirett
Local time: 19:48
Grading comment
Thank you everybody for your help and all the great explanations.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +14Not exactly the same (UK)David Sirett
4 +12same meaning but mark is never used in AERHELLER
4 +1UK - grades, too
jerrie
5just to support Rita
Iolanta Vlaykova Paneva
5same
Daniel Mencher


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +12
same meaning but mark is never used in AE


Explanation:
-

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 11:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1252

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daniel Mencher: Well, I wouldn't say that "mark" is never used, but it's used seldom enough to make "grade" notably American.
4 mins
  -> thanks Dan :-)

agree  Iolanta Vlaykova Paneva
8 mins
  -> thank you Yolanta :-)

agree  Marian Greenfield: I would agree with Dan, actually, as I might say, I got bad marks in xxx..., but it is rare to use marks in AE
13 mins
  -> thanks Marian :-)

agree  Fuad Yahya
30 mins
  -> thanks Fuad :-)

agree  xxxsarahl: to me, a mark is someone you're supposed to kill. ;-)
1 hr
  -> Sarah - you always keep me laughing :-)

neutral  Ildiko Santana: I agree with Davidás answer. "Never say never" Rita! ;)
6 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  Tanja Abramovic
8 hrs
  -> thanks Tanja :-)

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
10 hrs
  -> thanks Svetozar :-)

agree  senin
15 hrs
  -> thank you!

agree  Rusinterp: not entirely never though, just very rarely
1 day2 hrs
  -> thank you!

agree  horizon: I agree with Dan.
1 day5 hrs
  -> thank you!

neutral  Refugio: He got high marks for ...?
1 day10 hrs
  -> this expression is common but is rarely used at school in the U.S.; the specific question here was grade vs. mark

agree  tantie kustiantie: i agree with Dan answer
2 days6 hrs

agree  Rajiv Arora
5 days
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
same


Explanation:
In my experience, which is a 12-year career in New York public elementary/middle/high schools, they are the same, although I heard "grade" used much more often.

Good luck!

-Dan

Daniel Mencher
United States
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 19
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
just to support Rita


Explanation:
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=34011&dict=CA...
grade
a number or letter that shows how good someone's work or performance is:
Steve never studies, but he always gets good grades.
UK Carla got a grade A in German.



Iolanta Vlaykova Paneva
Canada
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Bulgarian
PRO pts in pair: 12
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
UK - grades, too


Explanation:
They are interchangeable in the sense of 'did you get good marks / grades for your test?'
I think grade is becoming more popular now in UK. My daughter talks about her grades, rather than her marks.
Often she will just say 'I got an A in Maths' - leaving out grade
Her report talks about performance grading and effort grading (I've just had a look!).

So, basically, I would use grades!

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  senin
15 hrs
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +14
Not exactly the same (UK)


Explanation:
A grade is a category: A, B, C, ... or 1, 2, 3, ...
A mark is more like a score: 17/20, 85/100.
Of course, they are parallel scales: e.g. all marks in the range 85-100 might merit grade A.
In the UK, major exam results in secondary school are given as grades. Individual essays, reports, etc., may be given marks or grades.

David Sirett
Local time: 19:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 301
Grading comment
Thank you everybody for your help and all the great explanations.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Knowles: mark is numeric; grade is alphabetic/symbolic
1 min

neutral  RHELLER: not in the U.S. (we would use score, as you have suggested)
42 mins
  -> Sure, Rita - I thought I made it clear enough I was talking about UK usage as I saw it

agree  John Bowden: Certainly true of the UK
1 hr

agree  Kardi Kho
3 hrs

agree  Nado2002
3 hrs

agree  Charlie Bavington: For the UK, I'd agree 100%. No idea about USA (altho you only ever hear people talk about "grades" on American TV progs, it seems to me).
5 hrs

agree  chopra_2002
5 hrs

agree  Ildiko Santana
6 hrs

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
9 hrs

agree  Gordon Darroch
14 hrs

agree  Jörgen Slet
1 day1 hr

agree  Rusinterp
1 day1 hr

agree  Refugio: In the US a half century ago, marks were given for indiviudual tests or papers, and grades were the final evaluation.
1 day10 hrs

agree  tantie kustiantie: according to my experience, In indonesia marks is given for studemt from elementary to high scholl level, and grade is given to student at university as final evaluation.
2 days6 hrs

agree  mportal
2 days13 hrs
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