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Neutra

English translation: Richard Neutra

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06:49 Jan 15, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Neutra
I left home with visions of Bob Hope's tan, martinis, and Neutra houses dancing in my head.
vkan
English translation:Richard Neutra
Explanation:
Richard Neutra
(b. Vienna 1892; d.Wuppertal, Germany 1970)

Richard Neutra was born in Vienna in 1892. He graduated in 1917 from the Technische Hochschule, Vienna, where he had been taught by Adolf Loos, and was influenced by Otto Wagner. He worked for Erich Mendelsohn in 1921-22 and in 1923 emigrated to the U.S. where he worked on several projects with Rudolf N. Schindler before establishing his own practice.

Neutra created a modern regionalism for Southern California which combined a light metal frame with a stucco finish to create a light effortless appearance. "He specialized in extending architectural space into a carefully arranged landscape. The dramatic images of flat-surfaced, industrialized residential buildings contrasted against nature were popularized by the photography of Julius Shulman."

An experienced and outspoken writer and speaker, Neutra worked with a series of successful partners including his wife, Dione, from 1922, his protege, Robert Alexander, from 1949-58 and his son, Dion, from 1965. He adamantly believed that modern architecture must act as an social force in the betterment of mankind.

Neutra died in Wuppertal, Germany in 1970.

http://www.greatbuildings.com/architects/Richard_Neutra.html


Richard J. Neutra
"Place Man in relationship to Nature; that's where he developed and where he feels most at home!"
-- Richard Neutra

Richard Joseph Neutra is considered one of the world's most influential modern architects. His innovative and open designs express the freedom from conventions that many find in Southern California. He was born in Vienna, Austria in 1892 and died in Los Angeles in 1970. In Berlin Neutra worked with modernist architect Erich Mendelsohn, but from his student days he was drawn to the United States. The work of Frank Lloyd Wright was an early inspiration, and it wasn't long before Neutra and his wife Dione arrived in New York in 1923. While in Chicago, where he'd traveled to meet Wright, the Neutras saw a travel poster exclaiming "California Calls You!" It wasn't long before they were on their way West.

Neutra's first impressions of Southern California were candid. He found Angelenos of the 1920s "mentally footloose" with a cultural naiveté "bordering everywhere on mixup." But he eventually grew to love his adopted city. With the support of friend and fellow Austrian-born Southern California architect, Rudolf Schindler, Neutra's first major commission, the Lovell House (1929), announced the arrival of an important new architectural vision. Neutra responded to the Southern California climate by creating designs where extensive use of glass allowed indoor and outdoor spaces to flow freely together. A journalist once described his work as " . . . the most amiable relationship between science, technique, industrialization and good taste."

In 1932 Neutra designed a home for himself in the Silverlake hills. It also served as his office. Describing his work habits in an article available at the Neutra website( www.neutra.org ), Neutra's architect son Dion writes: "Dad's best time for creative thinking was early in the morning, long before any activity had started in the office below. He often stayed in bed working with ideas and designs, even extending into appointments which had been made earlier. His one concession was to put on a tie over his night shirt when receiving visitors while still propped up in bed!"

One of Neutra's most famous projects is the Kauffman House (1946) built on a remote site near Palm Springs. Another is the Moore House (1952) in Ojai, featuring a reflecting pool which also served as a fire and irrigation reservoir. As Neutra's son Dion describes it, "the pool creates the illusion that the house in floating on a water garden." In addition to homes, Neutra designed many distinguished public buildings, including the Channel Heights housing project (1932) in San Pedro, the L.A. Hall of Records (1961-2), and schools, including Emerson Jr. High School (1938) in West L.A., Palos Verdes High School (1961) and the Fine Arts Building at Cal State Northridge (1961), which unfortunately was severely damaged in the 1994 earthquake and razed in 1997. Sadly, many Neutra designs have been lost, are poorly maintained, or modified beyond recognition. Racing against time, historians and architectural activists are working hard to preserve this great architect's contributions to an especially Southern California vision of urban life.

http://www.socalhistory.org/Biographies/neutra.htm
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Empty Whiskey Glass
Local time: 06:00
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Summary of answers provided
4 +5Richard Neutra
Empty Whiskey Glass
5Neutra
Gayle Wallimann
4Bauhaus meets Stucconyamuk


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
neutra
Richard Neutra


Explanation:
Richard Neutra
(b. Vienna 1892; d.Wuppertal, Germany 1970)

Richard Neutra was born in Vienna in 1892. He graduated in 1917 from the Technische Hochschule, Vienna, where he had been taught by Adolf Loos, and was influenced by Otto Wagner. He worked for Erich Mendelsohn in 1921-22 and in 1923 emigrated to the U.S. where he worked on several projects with Rudolf N. Schindler before establishing his own practice.

Neutra created a modern regionalism for Southern California which combined a light metal frame with a stucco finish to create a light effortless appearance. "He specialized in extending architectural space into a carefully arranged landscape. The dramatic images of flat-surfaced, industrialized residential buildings contrasted against nature were popularized by the photography of Julius Shulman."

An experienced and outspoken writer and speaker, Neutra worked with a series of successful partners including his wife, Dione, from 1922, his protege, Robert Alexander, from 1949-58 and his son, Dion, from 1965. He adamantly believed that modern architecture must act as an social force in the betterment of mankind.

Neutra died in Wuppertal, Germany in 1970.

http://www.greatbuildings.com/architects/Richard_Neutra.html


Richard J. Neutra
"Place Man in relationship to Nature; that's where he developed and where he feels most at home!"
-- Richard Neutra

Richard Joseph Neutra is considered one of the world's most influential modern architects. His innovative and open designs express the freedom from conventions that many find in Southern California. He was born in Vienna, Austria in 1892 and died in Los Angeles in 1970. In Berlin Neutra worked with modernist architect Erich Mendelsohn, but from his student days he was drawn to the United States. The work of Frank Lloyd Wright was an early inspiration, and it wasn't long before Neutra and his wife Dione arrived in New York in 1923. While in Chicago, where he'd traveled to meet Wright, the Neutras saw a travel poster exclaiming "California Calls You!" It wasn't long before they were on their way West.

Neutra's first impressions of Southern California were candid. He found Angelenos of the 1920s "mentally footloose" with a cultural naiveté "bordering everywhere on mixup." But he eventually grew to love his adopted city. With the support of friend and fellow Austrian-born Southern California architect, Rudolf Schindler, Neutra's first major commission, the Lovell House (1929), announced the arrival of an important new architectural vision. Neutra responded to the Southern California climate by creating designs where extensive use of glass allowed indoor and outdoor spaces to flow freely together. A journalist once described his work as " . . . the most amiable relationship between science, technique, industrialization and good taste."

In 1932 Neutra designed a home for himself in the Silverlake hills. It also served as his office. Describing his work habits in an article available at the Neutra website( www.neutra.org ), Neutra's architect son Dion writes: "Dad's best time for creative thinking was early in the morning, long before any activity had started in the office below. He often stayed in bed working with ideas and designs, even extending into appointments which had been made earlier. His one concession was to put on a tie over his night shirt when receiving visitors while still propped up in bed!"

One of Neutra's most famous projects is the Kauffman House (1946) built on a remote site near Palm Springs. Another is the Moore House (1952) in Ojai, featuring a reflecting pool which also served as a fire and irrigation reservoir. As Neutra's son Dion describes it, "the pool creates the illusion that the house in floating on a water garden." In addition to homes, Neutra designed many distinguished public buildings, including the Channel Heights housing project (1932) in San Pedro, the L.A. Hall of Records (1961-2), and schools, including Emerson Jr. High School (1938) in West L.A., Palos Verdes High School (1961) and the Fine Arts Building at Cal State Northridge (1961), which unfortunately was severely damaged in the 1994 earthquake and razed in 1997. Sadly, many Neutra designs have been lost, are poorly maintained, or modified beyond recognition. Racing against time, historians and architectural activists are working hard to preserve this great architect's contributions to an especially Southern California vision of urban life.

http://www.socalhistory.org/Biographies/neutra.htm

Empty Whiskey Glass
Local time: 06:00
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian
PRO pts in pair: 61

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  J. Leo
5 mins
  -> Thanks, James

agree  xxxcmwilliams
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Gayle Wallimann: You are right, Neutra designed Bob Hope's home as well as he did for many other big stars.(Frank Sinatra..)books.cheap-internet-store.com/.../Palm_Springs_Modern_Houses_in_the_California_Desert/ - 24k
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Gayle

agree  luzba
14 hrs
  -> Thanks, Luzba

agree  Mario Marcolin
1 day1 hr
  -> Thanks, Mario
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
neutra
Neutra


Explanation:
Neutra was the last name of the architect who designed tract housing, many federal government housing tracts for governament (military) workers were built according to his plans.

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Note added at 5 mins (2004-01-15 06:55:14 GMT)
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Bob Hope was a comedian who used to go to Viet Nam and different military bases to help lift the troops\' morale, thus the neutra houses.

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Note added at 2 hrs 50 mins (2004-01-15 09:39:45 GMT)
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At the height of its success, the Neutra firm employed more than 40 people in Los Angeles, CA, including several project architects and even its own engineers. In 1961 alone, 22 projects were completed, including a school, police headquarters, a library, a dormitory, naval base housing and various residences.

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Note added at 2 hrs 52 mins (2004-01-15 09:41:28 GMT)
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www.isdesignet.com/Magazine/J_F\'01/cover.html - 24k

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Note added at 2 hrs 57 mins (2004-01-15 09:46:35 GMT)
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After some more researching, I definitely think that Svetozar is correct unless there is reference to military housing or entertaining further on in the text.


    www.encyclopedia.com/html/N/Neutra-R1.asp - 34k
Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 05:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 172

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  J. Leo
8 mins

disagree  Laurel Porter: No, no, no... This is the wrong association for Neutra houses. They're not soulless tract homes, but were an attempt at a spare modern aesthetic... Svetzotar's philippic is more on the mark. Think flat roofs and wide-open spaces...
1 hr
  -> Yes, I know about the beautiful homes too, but Neutra did build military housing on some bases. See my additional comment.

neutral  nyamuk: I agree Neutra is associated with cheap stucco houses the way F L Wright is known for car-ports but I think the association is meant to be clever and condescending. Palm Springs modern is what is meant in the above text.
20 hrs
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20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
neutra
Bauhaus meets Stucco


Explanation:
While my first inclination when someone says Neutra house is inexpensive stucco houses with flat roofs cascading over the San Andreas Fault. I think that what they are talking about here is a flat roofed house in Palm Springs which was very much had its origins in the international style but at the same time very American with that wonder material Stucco.

So think of one of these steel and glass houses by Mies Van der Rohe, like the Farnsworth house ( http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/Farnsworth_House.htm... )

Then add some stucco panels and roll out a desert[ed] garden underneath and you have the Neutra House ( http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/Kaufmann_Desert_Hous... )






    Reference: http://www.architectureweek.com/2002/0424/news_1-1.html
nyamuk
United States
Local time: 21:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 58
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