KudoZ home » English » Other

Your beloved one or ones

English translation: Neither is usual

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
08:25 Feb 14, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other
English term or phrase: Your beloved one or ones
Which one is correct usage? tq
baby
English translation:Neither is usual
Explanation:
If talking of only one, i.e. "loved one", the expression is usually "your beloved"; if talking of more than one, the usual expression is "your loved ones". Whether this varies in the USA, I don't know, but this is what I'd expect in the UK.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 50 mins (2005-02-14 10:15:38 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

By far the more common expressions are \"my beloved\" when talking of one person, and \"my loved ones\" when talking of several people. Anything else just sounds odd to me, as a British English native speaker.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 50 mins (2005-02-14 10:15:44 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

By far the more common expressions are \"my beloved\" when talking of one person, and \"my loved ones\" when talking of several people. Anything else just sounds odd to me, as a British English native speaker.
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 03:32
Grading comment
I don't get what u mean?
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +6depends on how many people are concernedxxxCMJ_Trans
5 +2it depends on the number of people
Tsogt Gombosuren
4 +2Neither is usualDavid Moore


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
depends on how many people are concerned


Explanation:
beloved one = one person

beloved ones = several people

I suspect you are really trying to say "your loved ones", no?

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 03:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 48

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mikhail Kropotov: i think the goal is to say "your loved ones"
5 mins

agree  Darya Kozak
9 mins

agree  jerrie: "your loved ones" ...
9 mins

agree  Calou
10 mins

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
13 mins

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
24 mins

agree  Krisztina Lelik
1 hr

disagree  Alvaro Bengoa Jalabert: No one is wrong, depends of the number of persons that are beloved by you, one-1, ones-more than 1. I hope it helps you
18 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
your beloved one or ones
it depends on the number of people


Explanation:
one - for one person
ones - for more than one persons

Tsogt Gombosuren
Canada
Local time: 19:32
Native speaker of: Native in MongolianMongolian
PRO pts in category: 18

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Darya Kozak
7 mins
  -> Thanks a lot, Danissimo! :-)

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
12 mins
  -> Thanks a lot, Madeleine! :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
your beloved one or ones
Neither is usual


Explanation:
If talking of only one, i.e. "loved one", the expression is usually "your beloved"; if talking of more than one, the usual expression is "your loved ones". Whether this varies in the USA, I don't know, but this is what I'd expect in the UK.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 50 mins (2005-02-14 10:15:38 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

By far the more common expressions are \"my beloved\" when talking of one person, and \"my loved ones\" when talking of several people. Anything else just sounds odd to me, as a British English native speaker.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 50 mins (2005-02-14 10:15:44 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

By far the more common expressions are \"my beloved\" when talking of one person, and \"my loved ones\" when talking of several people. Anything else just sounds odd to me, as a British English native speaker.

David Moore
Local time: 03:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 53
Grading comment
I don't get what u mean?

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mikhail Kropotov: the usage is exactly like you just described it. out of curiousity i suppose, it would not be grammatically wrong to say "your beloved one(s)", would it?
4 mins
  -> Sorry, all I know is that I've never heard the expressions you give; whether they are strictly wrong, I do not know.

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro: Although I am not a native EN speaker, I have lived in UK for 16+ years and I totally agree with David. (Good, proper explanation too!)
1 hr
  -> Thanks Paula; and for the comment on the explanation...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search