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hoopoe-feathers

English translation: feathers from the hoopoe bird

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16:06 Jun 17, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Poetry & Literature / literature
English term or phrase: hoopoe-feathers
cock-feathers, hoopoe-feathers, owl-feathers
Hade
English translation:feathers from the hoopoe bird
Explanation:
The hoopoe is an exotic looking bird that is the size of a mistle thrush. ... Hoopoe (illustration) - Norman Arlott (AA World Travel Library) ...
Selected response from:

David Knowles
Local time: 00:00
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +15feathers from the hoopoe bird
David Knowles
4 +3feathers of Upupa
luskie


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +15
feathers from the hoopoe bird


Explanation:
The hoopoe is an exotic looking bird that is the size of a mistle thrush. ... Hoopoe (illustration) - Norman Arlott (AA World Travel Library) ...



    Reference: http://www.rspb.org.uk/birds/guide/h/hoopoe/index.asp
David Knowles
Local time: 00:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 72
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: there is a photo there :-)
0 min
  -> So there is, and a distribution map showing it can get to the UK!

agree  Andrey Belousov
2 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  luskie: hi there :)
2 mins

agree  xxxtazdog
10 mins

agree  Aisha Maniar
11 mins

agree  Charlie Bavington
13 mins

agree  ahmadwadan.com
19 mins

agree  Balasubramaniam L.: I think the bird's scientific name is Upopa epops. Yes, quite a common garden bird in India. It is called Hudhud in Hindi, after how Hindi-speaking people interpret the sound of its call. The English name is also onomatopoeic I think.
38 mins

agree  Kirill Semenov: not that exotic: we have a lot of the birds in the place where I was born and raised. I saw it many times :) Really nice one :)
1 hr

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
3 hrs

agree  Johan Venter
5 hrs

agree  Rina LS
8 hrs

agree  Alp Berker
9 hrs

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 day7 hrs

agree  Rachel Fell
1 day8 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
feathers of Upupa


Explanation:
possibly Upupa epops, the comon bird

here's a picture:

http://images.google.it/imgres?imgurl=http://carrbrookvillag...

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Note added at 4 mins (2005-06-17 16:11:28 GMT)
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ops, common

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Note added at 21 mins (2005-06-17 16:28:15 GMT)
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After that \'neutral\' I\'ve got, I guess that I\'d better point out that animals are to be called first of all by their scientific names, which are latin in fact. Hoopoe is the English term for Upupa. The most common species of Upupa is Upupa epops, but many others exist.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 30 mins (2005-06-17 16:37:25 GMT)
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Avibase - The World Bird Database - [ Traduci questa pagina ]
Egyptian Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops major) ssp.: (Upupa epops orientalis)
ssp.: (Upupa epops ceylonensis) ssp.: (Upupa epops longirostris) ...
www.bsc-eoc.org/avibase/avibase. jsp?pg=search&fam=93.0&lang=EN

btw, I don\'t think it\'s a non-PRO question anymore...

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Note added at 1 hr 18 mins (2005-06-17 17:25:50 GMT)
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Hoopoes are quite diffused in Europe and Asia. But I\'m not going to spend my precious time on this one when there\'s google at a click for anyone of us. I don\'t even think the asker is particularly interested in its prevalence.

Anyway, just to share my thought, I really can\'t believe things are going this way. I gave my agree to the colleague above because I found his answer preceding mine, and it\'s a correct answer. But, to be honest, I\'m having a hard time trying to understand how < hoopoe-feathers = feathers from the hoopoe > can gather such a bunch of agrees and < hoopoe-feathers = feathers from the Upupa > (ie, an answer that imo adds quite a bit to it) collects 2 neutrals!
Have a nice friday night, you all :o)


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Note added at 4 hrs 4 mins (2005-06-17 20:11:00 GMT)
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thus:
- shame on me for adding a hint of a scientific background to a literary (!?) question;
- shame on me for giving the correct name of the species (btw, Balasubramaniam is wrong here)
- shame on me for saying correctly that the species is common (btw, thanks Kirill)
- to be continued...

please join in and help me to learn how to answer by saying nothing ;o)

luskie
Local time: 01:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charlie Bavington: that is the bird in question, but it's called a hoopoe in English :-)
11 mins
  -> I perfectly know that. Actually, I gave the scientific (latin) name of the species. Cheers

neutral  humbird: I agree with your choice of scientific name. However the bird is not common. See David's link. It says the bird's passage to UK is only 100! Is such number an indication of its prevalence?
54 mins
  -> please read above

neutral  jrb: but surely when referring to feathers in literature and poetry one would use the common name rather than the scientific name?
2 hrs
  -> yes, surely, many thanks

agree  Balasubramaniam L.: Common or rare, it depends on where you are from. Hoopoe is quite a common garden bird in India.//Hey luskie, you took it that hard ! Yes I am wrong, of course, I said "I think" though in the comment.
12 hrs
  -> not a matter of tAking it this or that hard - just saying what I think

agree  Rachel Fell: I didn't know there were all those other types of hoopoe - thanks!
1 day7 hrs
  -> thank YOU, rachel!

agree  Robert Donahue: Like Jessica, I'd use the common name rather than the scientific one. Otherwise, this is a really good answer. Nice job!
4 days
  -> thank you, I really appreciate this - certainly I was not suggesting that Upupa epops be used in the text - after all, hoopoe is already there ;o)
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (1): Balasubramaniam L.
Non-PRO (3): luskie, Charlie Bavington, humbird


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Changes made by editors
Jun 17, 2005 - Changes made by humbird:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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