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locked inside their shucks

English translation: locked inside their skin (hard skin, sells)

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03:00 Jun 20, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / children's literature
English term or phrase: locked inside their shucks
She could see the glimmering backs of brisk, playful roaches, and pearl-shells that had their hardened tears locked inside their shucks.

Dear native English speakers!
Please let me know if the phrase sounds OK to you and the idea is clear here.
The 'hardened tears' are pearls that the shellfish keep inside their shells.
This is my translation from Russian.
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 23:55
English translation:locked inside their skin (hard skin, sells)
Explanation:
Most native speakers will not recognize the word "shuck" and almost no children, if young, will. However, if you use "skin" or "hard skin" or even "shell" then most will understand.

It also depends on the age of the children.

Mike :)

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Note added at 4 mins (2005-06-20 03:04:47 GMT)
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Excuse me, I meant to write: \"locked inside their skin (hard skin, shells)\"
Selected response from:

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 12:55
Grading comment
Thanks for your help Michael!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1locked inside their skin (hard skin, sells)
Michael Powers (PhD)
5we're talking art here right?zaphod
4cuticleMaria Chmelarova
3 +1locked insideKen Cox
3carapace
Balasubramaniam L.


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
locked inside their skin (hard skin, sells)


Explanation:
Most native speakers will not recognize the word "shuck" and almost no children, if young, will. However, if you use "skin" or "hard skin" or even "shell" then most will understand.

It also depends on the age of the children.

Mike :)

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Note added at 4 mins (2005-06-20 03:04:47 GMT)
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Excuse me, I meant to write: \"locked inside their skin (hard skin, shells)\"

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 12:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 120
Grading comment
Thanks for your help Michael!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  KathyT: I would go with 'shell' - only know SHUCK from shucked oysters!
2 mins
  -> I like "shell" also - I didn't even know "shuck" except as a verb when we "shuck the corn."
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51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cuticle


Explanation:
insects and some crustaceans are locked inside their cuticle... and most of children should understand that, because it is term used in biology ...

Maria Chmelarova
Local time: 12:55
Native speaker of: Slovak
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
we're talking art here right?


Explanation:
and pearl-shells that had their hardened tears locked inside their shucks.

"and pearly-shells with their un-shucked, hardened, tears"

Kids aren't stupid, they can figured out the imagery for themselves. "Shuck" is a verb not a noun.

zaphod
Local time: 18:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 8
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
locked inside


Explanation:
My suggestion would be to reword the phrase: '... and shells with their pearly tears locked inside.' (or even 'pearly oyster shells with their hidden tears inside', although I doubt that most children or even adults would immediately understand this as a reference to pearls)..

As for roach, it is indeed a type of fish, but it would be entirely unknown to NA children and probably not well known to UK children. You could use 'roach-fish' if you wanted to keep the specific name, although as others have mentioned most people understand 'roach' to mean 'cockroach'.

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Note added at 5 hrs 43 mins (2005-06-20 08:44:14 GMT)
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delete \'oyster\' above

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Note added at 5 hrs 53 mins (2005-06-20 08:53:33 GMT)
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More on roach: the Oxford dico says they are in the carp family, and answers. com says that \'some types of North American sunfish\' are related. The \'gleaming backs of carp\' (or of sunfish) would thus be a possible alternative -- many people are familiar with carp, and \'sunfish\' is an attractive name even if peopple don\'t necessarily know what a sunfish is.

Ken Cox
Local time: 18:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
15 mins
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
carapace


Explanation:
carapace means hard upper shell of a tortoise or a crustacean.

Since the thing you have here is a shellfish, this term many be appropriate.

Also, as KathyT points out, roach means a cockroach, which is an insect and it has no shell as such. Or are the pear-shells and the roaches two differnt creatures?

Other terms that you could use are "pod" or "case".

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Note added at 37 mins (2005-06-20 03:38:15 GMT)
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\"Shucks\" is unfamiliar to me too, in the sense you have used.

The only \"Shucks\" I have heard is the exclamatory one meaning \"Oh hell!\"

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Note added at 1 hr 44 mins (2005-06-20 04:45:02 GMT)
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Instead of \"locked inside\" their shucks I would use

\"tucked away\" or \"concealed\" or \"hidden\" or some such word as \"locked inside\" doesn\'t seem correct.



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Note added at 4 hrs 30 mins (2005-06-20 07:30:32 GMT)
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Some common fish names that an average English-speaking child would know are the following: Trout, salmon, carp, minnows, pike, piranha, catfish, angler fish, angel fish, guppy, goldfish, eel...

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Note added at 7 hrs 41 mins (2005-06-20 10:42:20 GMT)
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Oh, I completely missed that you are talking about oysters and pearls here. You can ignore my above comment about \"locked inside\". It seems appropriate in the sense of locking up something that is valuable.

Balasubramaniam L.
India
Local time: 22:25
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in category: 32
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