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rule (over)

English translation: rule over

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01:38 Jun 24, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / children's literature
English term or phrase: rule (over)
The Witch of the Swamps ruled over toads and leeches.


Dear native English speakers!
Please advise if it's better to use the 'over' here or omit it? I don't see much difference, but I'm not a native English speaker, after all. Perhaps your explanation will be an eye-opener.
Thank you!

P.S.This is my translation from Russian.
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 00:36
English translation:rule over
Explanation:
Mike :)

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Note added at 4 mins (2005-06-24 01:42:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"rule over someone or something: to serve as the boss or chief over someome or something\"

Definition found in NTC\'s Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs and Other Idiomatic Verbal Phrases (Richard A. Spears, 1993)

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Note added at 5 mins (2005-06-24 01:44:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

At least for me, although \"rule\" by itself means to be in charge, when the recipient of the action of being ruled is explicitly mentioned, it \"sounds more natural\" to include \"over\". I know, not very scientific ...
Selected response from:

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 13:36
Grading comment
Thanks for your help Michael!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +12rule over
Michael Powers (PhD)
3 +2a slight nuanceRHELLER
4"was the ruler of" or "was in charge"
Sogifted


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +12
rule over


Explanation:
Mike :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2005-06-24 01:42:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"rule over someone or something: to serve as the boss or chief over someome or something\"

Definition found in NTC\'s Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs and Other Idiomatic Verbal Phrases (Richard A. Spears, 1993)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2005-06-24 01:44:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

At least for me, although \"rule\" by itself means to be in charge, when the recipient of the action of being ruled is explicitly mentioned, it \"sounds more natural\" to include \"over\". I know, not very scientific ...

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 13:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 120
Grading comment
Thanks for your help Michael!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Balasubramaniam L.
2 mins
  -> Thank you, Balassubramaniam - Mike :)

agree  Can Altinbay: Yes.
27 mins
  -> Thank you, Can - Mike :)

agree  RHELLER: yes "rule over" is correct here
48 mins
  -> Thank you, Rita - Mike :)

agree  Refugio
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Ruth - Mike :)

agree  Saiwai Translation Services
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Saiwai Translation Services

agree  Altrum: I would say that "rule over" was more emphatic or authoritarian
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, Altrum - Mike :)

agree  Katherine Hodkinson
8 hrs
  -> Thank you, Katherine - Mike :)

agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
8 hrs
  -> Thank you, Margaret - Mike :)

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
8 hrs

agree  airmailrpl: The Swamp Witch ruled over ...
1 day6 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
1 day6 hrs

agree  xxxgtreyger
3 days10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
a slight nuance


Explanation:
a grand soverign/king/queen rules over dominions and many subjects

so it is definitely correct here
but I just wanted to let you know that it sounds funny - hah, she rules over....toads and leeches (big deal :-)
almost like we are making fun of her

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 11:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 66

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio
46 mins
  -> thanks Ruth!

agree  airmailrpl: "sounds funny ".. even Swamp Witchs have to make do with the hand that is dealt to them
1 day5 hrs
  -> thanks !
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
"was the ruler of" or "was in charge"


Explanation:
"was the ruler of" uses the same term - as a noun; "was in charge" uses a differnet term that has the meaning of authority - but not the royal sense.

Sogifted
United States
Local time: 13:36
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew
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